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I dedicate this book to my loving husband Dmitry Sergeevich Klementiev and to all those language students throughout Russia who are studying English. Tatiana Klementieva
T. 6. KneMeHTbeBa KHMrA ; J.- '-ITEHMSI K Y"le6HoMY M3AaHMIO C C111Jl ZJI, 6bt C - AJls:l YLlaw.L.1xcs:I 7-9 KJ1aCCOB o6w.eo6pa30BaTeJ1bHO WKOJ1bl " ccTMTyn» · 06HMHCK. 1998
66K 81.2 AHrJ1.-922 K48 YAK 802.0(075.3) The author and the publshers are deeply grateful to Dennis Pitts, the National Gallery of London, studio "Autograph" (Obninsk) for their support in the research and organization of the materials used in this book. The author would like to single out for special acknowledgment. for invaluable assistance: Veronika Arsalan, Olga Arsalan, Virginia Brickman, Cheryl Connely, Luisa Dneprova, Boris Demchenko, Gina Dobson, Joan Hensel, Boris Klementiev, Dmitriy Kozlov, Svetlana Sabarshova, Galina Serebryakova, Corinne Sharpe, Irina Sutokskaya, Paul Tibbenham, Collen Viggiks, David Granville Young, Galina Zimina. Publishers are also gateful to: Pavellgnatov, Eugene Isakov, the Kaufman family, Mikhail Mezheritsky, the Miretsky family. KneMeHTbeBa T. 6. K48 KHMra AnSI 'ITeHMSI K y e6HOMY i-13AaHi-11O «C aCTJli-1Bbl aHrJ1i-1 CK . KH. 2» AJ1 y aLL\i-1xc 7-9 KJl. o6LL\eo6pa30B. WK.- 06Hi-1HCK: T TYJ1, 1998.-336 c.: 10111. ISBN 5-86866-071-4 n peAllaraeMa KH ra All "ITeH (<<Reader») K Y"Ie6HoMY L-13AaHVlIO «Happy En- glish-2» L-13BeCTHoro aBTopa T. 6. l<I1eMeHTbeBo SlBll eTC cocTaBHo "IaCTblO YMK. KH ra COCTOVIT L-13 AeBSlTL-1 "IaCTe . OHa, HeCOMHeHHO, Bbl30BeT L-1HTepeC y Vl3Y- "IalOllI.L-1X aHrJ1L-1 CKL-1 3b1K L-1. B nepBYIO O"lepeAb, y Y"l TeJ1e aHrllL-1 CKOrO Sl3b1Ka VI L-1X Y4eHL-1KOB, TaK KaK B He COAep>KaTCSI OpL-1rL-1HallbHble TeKCTbl 06 aHrJ10Sl3b14HbtX CTpaHax, L-1X npL-1pOAe, KYllbTYpe, AOCTonpVlMe4aTeJ1bHOCTSlX, 0 CVlCTeMe 06pa30Ba- HL-1S1, 0 3HaMeHL-1TblX XYAO)l(H KaX, KOMn03L-1TOpaX, eHblX. L-1TaTeJ1b Ha AeT paCCKa- 3b1 L-13BeCTHbiX aHrll i1cKL-1X L-1 aMep KaHCKL-1X aBTopOB O. YaJ1b,Qa, C. M03Ma, O. reH- p , A. KapHerL-1. OAHL-1M 3 MHOrOY CJ1eHHblX AOCTOL-1HCTB KH rL-1 BJ1 eTC TO, YTO paCCKa3b1Ba B 3aH MaTeJ1bHO AOCTYnHO cpopMe 06 aHrJ10St3b1YHblX CTpaHax, aBTOp npL-1BOAL-1T L-1HTepeCHbie CBeAeH 0 POCCL-1 , 0 TOM "ITO Bll eTC Hawe Ha- OHaJ1bHO rOPAOCTblO,- 0 3HaMeHL-1TblX nL-1CaTeJ1 X, yyeHblX, KOMn03 Topax, xy- AO)l(H KaX, 0 HaWL-1X YHL-1KaJ1bHblX no CBoe KpaCOTe CTapL-1HHblX ropOAax. XYAO)KeC- TBeHHblX MY3e x, rallepe x. MHoro BH MaHL-1St YAeJ1eHO np06J1eMe 3alll.L-1TbI OKp\0Ka- IOllI.e cpeAbi. KHL-1ra cHa6)1(eHa TeKCTaML-1 All YCTHbiX BblCKa3b1BaHL-1 Ha caMbie pa3Ho06pa3Hble TeMbi. ABTOp L-1 B 3TO KHL-1re OCTaeTC BepeH CBoe KOHuenUL-1 - npeBpaTL-1Tb npouecc L-13Y"leHL-1 3b1Ka B 3aHL-1MaTeJ1bHbI «C"IaCTJ1L-1BbI ». n03TOMY 60J1bWL-1HCTBO aHrJ1L-1 C- KL-1X TeKCTOB cHa6)1(eHbI PYCCKL-1ML-1 nepeBOAaM L-1J1L-1 nOCTpaHL-1"1HblMl-1 KOMMeHTa- p ML-1. YAK 802.0(075.3) - @ l<I1eMeHTbeBa T. 6., 1996. @ V13AaTeJ1bCTBO «T TYll», 3AaHL-1e, O OpMJ1eHVle, 1996. ISBN 5-86866-071-4
Co te s Unit 1 MANNERS AND FRIENDSHIP IN THE USA AND U.K. ENGLISH-SPEAKING COUNTRIES Summary 17 · Great Britain 20 · The United States of America 33 G REA T RUSSIA ................................................................ 38 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................. 44 DEVELOPMENTS The Ants and the Grasshopper 45 Unit 2 POLITEN ESS .................................................................... 53 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................. 62 DEVELOPMENTS Cinderella (Ch. Perrault) 63 · Absent-mindedness (Jerome K. Jerome) 66 J it3 POLITEN ESS .................................................................... 69 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................. 78 DEVELOPMENTS The Rose is Red (C. Brink) 79 ] - 4 SOCIAL AND POLITE CUSTOMS .......................................... 87 SCHOOLS in AMERICA 91 · in BRITAIN 96 · in RUSSIA 97 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................ 99 DEVELOPMENTS Einstein for a Day 100 · The Dragonfly and the Bee 101 · A Lesson (Jerome K. Jerome) 102 ni 5 POLITEN ESS ................................................................... 107 CITIES AND MONUMENTS ................................................ 114 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................ 119 DEVELOPMENTS A Forgetful Tourist 121 · Androcles 121 · The Land of White Nights 123 · If You're Wrong, Admit It (D. Carnegie) 127 Un- SURVIVAL SKI LLS ............................................................ 131 OUR DEAR, DEAR ANIMALS................................................ 134 SPORT, HOBBI ES ............................................................. 140 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................145 DEVELOPMENTS Belling the Cat 146 · The Doctor and Young Living 147 · The Discontented Pig (G. Wilde) 147
u -[ TABLE MAN N ERS ............................................................. 153 MEALS ........................................................................... 158 DEVELOPMENTS The Luncheon (S. Maugham) 164 U -t8 MUSEUMS .................... .... ............................ ................. 173 The Teddy Bear Museum 173 · The Tower of London 174 · The British Museum 175 · The Natural History Museum 180 · The Science Museum 186 · Alexander Push kin Museum Flat 198 ART GALLERIES The Tate Gallery 188 · The National Gallery 191 · The State Tretyakov Gallery 194 · Manezh 196 BRITISH ARTISTS Turner 191 · Constable 192 · Hogarth 193 THE KREMLIN The Diamond Treasury 197 · Kremlin Bells 200 · The National Treasure of Russia 201 · Russian Orders 204 ENVIRONMENT AND ECOLOGy........................................... 208 DEVELOPMENTS The Nightingale and the Rose (0. Wilde) 222 U it9 FAMOUS ENGLISHMEN ... ... ............ ...... .... ....... .............. .... 229 COMPOSERS Vivaldi 230 · Haydn 230 · Beethoven 231 · Bach 232 · Mozart 233 · Tchaikovsky 234 · Prokofiev 235 WRITERS Shakespeare 240 · Dickens 240 · Kipling 240 · Irving 240 · Longfellow 240 · Twain 241 · O'Henry 241 · Christie 243 SCIENCE, INVENTIONS, DISCOVERIES Leonardo da Vinci 244 · Faraday 245 · Columbus 246 · Heyerdahl 249 JUST FOR FUN ................................................................252 DEVELOPMENTS The Power of Friendship 253 · The Last Leaf (O'Henry) 254 s ............................................................... 258 - CS ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 272 r ...................................................... 314
. I All the texts are on the tape. Use the material in any way you like. You can read or listen or read and listen simultaneously. Choose which is best for you. But The English language doesn't have simple phonetic rules. Try reading English words by sounding them out.
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1. Listen, read and act out. Manners and friendship in the USA and U.K. When meeting someone new, Americans and Englishmen usually have certain man- ners. They: - Look them in the eye. - Smile. - Say "Hello. My name is/ I'm ... It's nice to meet you, ..." (Say their names.) - Stand up when a grown-up enters the room. - Say "How do you do?" if it is a stranger. Men and boys do not offer their hand to shake unless the girl or lady offer theirs. When they talk to grown-ups, use their titles: "Yes, Mrs. Brown." "No, Doctor White." Do you know that the only formally cor- rect way to address people in Great Britain is "Madam" and "Sir"? Schoolboys and school- girls call their teacher "Sir", if it is a man. And if the teacher is a woman, they say "Miss". Say: "Sorry" or "Excuse me", or "I beg your pardon", if you don't under- stand. Some topics of conversation or things they might talk to a new friend abo- ut may include: - What do you do? - Where do you go to school? - What are your hobbies, favourite things to do? - Do you play any sports? - What are your favourite movies, books, songs, musical groups, etc.? LI E ,\ \. \\ ,,.. . f I : I ! /1 . I / i f II I ., , ' \ .) " . 't1\ .. - . , II , J -) J 'I . I · ; , t \ Ijl,___ " l '\ . ,. Guard! - Don't interrupt your new friends, while they are talking. Wait for a pau- se in the conversation. - Don't talk too loud or get too close to your new friend. Generally stay about one arm's length away. WORDLIST certain [Is :tn] - OnpeAeJ1eHHbli1 close [kl us] - 6J1 3K i1 conversation Lk nv 'seif n] - pa3roBop. 6eceAa enter ['ent ] - BXOAVlTb formally ['f :n1( )1] - o<1> u. aJ1bHO friendship ['frendJip] - APY'K6a generally ['<Ben r li] - 06b1l1HO grown-up ['gr unAp] - B3POCJ1b1i1 guard [ga:d] -OCTeperaTbCR I beg your pardon - 3B H Te include [in'klu:d] - BKJ1lOlIaTb interrupt Lint 'rApt] - npepblBaTb loud [laud] - rpoMKVI manner ['mren ] - MaHepa, 06pa3 Ae cTBVI movie ['mu:vi] - K HO offer [' f ] - npeAllaraTb pause [p :z] - naY3a shake hands - nO)KaTb APyr APYry PYK stay about one arm's length ['leI)8] -CTO Tb Ha nOll- TVlTeJ1bHOM paccTo H VI (CTO Tb Ha paccTo HVlVI BblTfI- HYTO PYK ) stranger ['strein<t);)] - He3HaKOMeL,t title [taitl] - T TyJ1, 3A. o<1> u.1-1a.nbHa <1>opMa 06pa- eH fI topic ['t pik] - TeMa unless [An'les] -AO Tex nop nOKa Unit 1 9
II - Don't say anything critical to a new friend. Instead focus on what you have in common or pay your new friend a compliment. - Never ask grown-ups the question "How old are you?" Write down as many facts from the text as you can. Exchange papers with a partner. Now look back to the text to see how much you have remembered.  -- .!> ) ,,- - Hi, Tom,! . ..... a\ - Hi, Jill! l \ , '.... , -,",",. i ,  Greetings American Informality Americans are often very informal. They greet each other informally. Usually they say "Hi" whether they are greeting a close friend, an older person, a child, or their employee. Americans often call one another by their first names, even when they do not know one another well. Are people in your country more or less formal with each other than people in the United States? ( , _. '"' Formal Introductions Usually American greetings are informal. People say "Hi" or "Hello". But sometimes people use formal introductions. 1/ / f . \ ... (, .., i). ,{  . . I ,\ . ,  .' , "\ \ . ! '0 · \ \1  \ ,\ ',I ,,\ ,  . , - \  ," ,  ,:Q  . - , .  .. . ,. " " 1'- .. ,  . , .. 4 · ..' r . \ '- , '. \ '.£ \\. .  .', \\\, , " . \t' .,.' / i.\ . \,\ '. , ;1 .., \ .' t-_! ,- ., . G .I (/.4   , ""A. \ ..;: "" . . '. -.......  . . ?, . 00 . 0, \ .: , .. \. . .' .. . '-- . -." . . .A . :> , ! '" : j r ,\ . ". . \ , I , ;;-; I.... "';::so . , , _\ !,.- ",., It!!' 1 --.. .\ , .-. - .... " "'. . ".. .'" i \ · ""'.' .",' " \ ....  - Mrs. Bell, I'd like you to meet my brother Boris. - How do you do, Boris. - Pleased to meet you, Mrs. Bell. WORDLIST call [k:l] - Ha3blBaTb close [klus] - 6J1V13KVI compliment ['kmplimnt] - KOMnJ1J.1MeHT critical ['kritikl] - KpVlTVlYeCKVI employee Lempli'i:] - COTPYAHVlK .focus on ['fguks] - cocpeAOTOYlt1TbCfI greet ['gri:t] - npVlseTcTBosaTb have (smth) in common ['kmn] - VlMeTb (YTO-TO) 06w-ee informal [in'f:ml] - He0cDVll\VlaJ1bHblC1 instead [in 'sted] - BMeCTO B3aMeH partner ['pa:tnJ] - napTHep whether [Iweo] - J1 1 0 Un it 1 
Formal Goodbyes When you are leaving after being introduced to a person for the first time, it is polite to say, "It was nice meeting you" or Ult was a pleasure to meet you." What do people in your country usually say in this situation? Even though Americans are informal, there are still some polite customs in this country. Are these customs the same in your country? "'J, '"' . "'J \ r     . -. . . .. .. )1 . .' , ) e. ) . ,.  .I "- ". , . J ,. ....... 1 . . "' " CJ ., ,  \ :" ! . -  \I '. 1 .,al. ... ..:a   ..  ..    I I I I 0 1 m 2m 3m 50 em to 1 m 20 em - friends can come within this space. 1 m 20 em to 2 m 70 em - all the other people that they meet usually come within this area. \ .- -...... j ,,. , . .... J \ :f.\.\( "", J  1'\} r  o ,,' '. 0 fJ \. . · , . . : i . if .f .\...)  . ' ..  , ./ 'Jr- .. t,. . .'J r. .'- · . i!;.... 4,  1.,  . . I J 'II'! ' "',1 . { " \ . "11,1 .t ;. '..(; : , -. "'t "" ..... WORDLIST after being introduced [Ia:ft 'bi:il) ,intr'dju:st]- nOCJ1e Toro, KaK Bac npeACTaBIi111 area ['cri] - paccTos:JHLt1e cafeteria Lkrefi'tiri] - Ka$eTepVl custom ['kAstm] - 06blyai1 etc. (etcetera) [it'setr] -  TaKAMee  TOMY nOA06Hoo even though ['i:vn ou] - HeCMOTpSl Ha if possible ['psibl] - eCJ1V1 310 B03MO>KHO jump the queue [<tAmp O kju:] - nOAoi1TVI 6ea OyepeAIi1 o 1) Americans and Englishmen don't like people to come too near to them. Do you touch people? Many Northern Europeans and North Americans don't touch each other very much. 2) Most polite Americans wait qui- etly in lines (ticket lines, cafeteria li- nes, etc.). They try not to touch the pe- ople in front of them or behind them, if pos- sible. It is not polite to jump the queue. Is this custom the same in your native count- ry? One of the school rules in America is "Keep your hands to yourself." line [lain] - OyepeAb native ('neitiv] - pOAHOi1. 3A. c06cTBeHHbl quietly ['kwaiatli] - cnoKoVlHo space [speis] - npocTpaHcTBo the same [seim] -TOT >Ke caMbI ticket line ['tikit lain] - OyepeAb 3a 6J1eTaMVI touch [tA tf] - KacaTbCSI, AOTparBaTbcS1 wait [weit] ->KAaTb within [wi'(}in] - B npeAeJ1aX Unit 1 11 
 \ ...., , 4 _ . · 1" ............. _ L "  - Hi, Bob! - Hi, Jim! How's life? -  p m '9'\ ..;, __  \ \ I  .) J .  , \ I " \, - =,  , '. \:' ' ,I \ ..I':;' J '" . n . .. 0." )  . _E3'' -.it ! -f \11 -.,- J'   II \ ,.. .t:- ,  " .. ( : ,   -  I If" t . ....  t .. .I '\ ..- .. .j 'I \) .wr \.,I .:: I . "......  .a:...& . 3) In America and Great Britain people who are very good friends don't shake hands. (Unless they haven't seen each other for a long time or one wants to congratulate the other.) As a foreign visitor to Britain or the States, people will shake you by the hand when you are introduced and when you finally depart. They will probab- ly not shake your hand at other times. Do people in your country shake hands? 4) Most Americans smile a lot to be polite. However, they usually do not smile at strangers in crowded city streets, or on buses, or trains. Do people smile very often to be polite in your country? 2. Act out the dialogue. Mind your manners! 1) An English family arrives at your house. Greet and receive them. Katya My name's Katya. Mr. Smith I'm Peter Smith. How do you do, Katya? Pleased to meet you. Katya How do you do, Mr. Smith. It's nice to meet you too. Mr. Smith This is my on Paul. Paul Hello, Katya. Katya Hello, Paul. Katya Please come in. Mr. Smith Thank you. Katya Please sit down. Would you like a drink? Mr. Smith Yes, we would. Mineral water for me. What do you want, Paul? Paul The same for me, please. Katya Here you are. Katya What do you do, Mr. Smith? Mr. Smith I'm a teacher. Katya And what does your wife do? WORDLIST be introduced Lintr'dju:st] - 6blTb npeACTaB1leHHbIM congratulate [kn'grretju,leit] - n03ApaBJ1SHb crowded ['kraudid] streets - YJ1llbl, 3an0J1HeHHble HapOAOM 12 I!mIII depart [di'pa:t] -YXOATb however [hau'ev] - OAHaKO. TeM He MeHee smile [smail] - Yl1bl6aTbC5I stranger ['stre i net:;)] - He3HaKoMeu. nOCTopoHHVli1 
Keep your hands to yourself. Don't touch each other. Mr. Smith Sorry? Katya What does your wife do? Mr. Smith She is an artist. Katya What do you do, Paul? Paul I go to school. Katya What's your hobby, Paul? Paul I collect books on art. Katya Do you play any sports? Paul Yes, I do. I play tennis and I like swimming very much. Mr. Smith It's nine o'clock. We must go. Thank you very much. It was pleasure to meet you, Katya. Goodbye. Katya Goodbye. See you tomorrow. 2) The guests from English-speaking countries came to your school. One of them came to your class to meet you. Ask her questions about her family, hobbies, interests. Mrs. Hay How do you do? My name's Barbara Hay. Student A How do you do? Sorry - what's your name again? Mrs. Hay I'm Barbara Hay. Student B Please have a seat. Mrs. Hay Thank you. Don't interrupt each other. l/' * * * Student B What do you do? Mrs. Hay I'm a teacher of English. Student C Are you from England? Mrs.. Hay No, I'm not. I'm American. Student A Where do you live? Mrs. Hay In New York. * * * Student B Have you been to Moscow before? Mrs. Hay Yes, I have. Student C When were you here last time? Mrs. Hay Two years ago. Student A Do you like Russia? Mrs. Hay Yes, I do, very much. Student B You speak Russian, don't you? Mrs. Hay No, I don't. I speak a little French. Student C Do you like Russian food? Mrs. Hay Yes, I do. Student C What's your favourite food? Mrs. Hay Pizza. * * * Student A Do you like music? Mrs. Hay Yes, I do. Student B You like rock music, don't you? Mrs. Hay No, I don't. I prefer jazz and classical music. Student C Do you play an instrument? Mrs. Hay Yes, I do. I play the violin. Unit 1 DI 
14 Unit 1 * * * Student A Do you like reading? Mrs. Hay Yes, I do. Student B What sort of books do you like? Mrs. Hay Novels and science fiction. Student A Do you like detective stories? Mrs. Hay No, I don't. Student C Who is your favourite American writer? Mrs. Hay Ernest Hemingway. * * * Student A Have you got any children? Mrs. Hay Yes, I've got two. I've got an eleven year old girl, called Ann and a boy. Student B What is his name? Mrs. Hay John. Student C How old is your son? Mrs. Hay He is twenty. Student A What does he do? Mrs. Hay He is an architect. Student B What does Ann do? Mrs. Hay She goes to school. Student C What does your husband do? Mrs. Hay He works in a bank. * * * Student A There's something you want to say, isn't there? Mrs. Hay Yes, there is. John is trying to get a new job and is very busy. He is sending applications all over the country. I've got a grandson. He is about 15 months. He's just learning to walk. * * * Student B I want to ask you some questions. You live in New York, don't you? Mrs. Hay Yes, that's right. Student C Do you live in a house or in an apartment? Mrs. Hay I live in a house. Student C Is it an old house? Mrs. Hay Yes, it is. Student C Is it a large house? Mrs. Hay No, it's not very large. Student A How many bedrooms are there? Mrs. Hay There are three. Student B How large is your kitchen? Mrs. Hay I think it's about thirty-six square feet. Student A What is the weather like in New York now? Mrs. Hay It's sunny and hot. 
L.  PLAY II L .. PLAY * * * Student How long have you been working? Mrs. Hay Since 1985, for more than ten years. Student How do you get to school? Mrs. Hay I usually go by bus, but sometimes I walk. Student How far is it from your house to school? Mrs. Hay About two miles. Student Where did you work before? Mrs. Hay I was a manager in a Mall. * * * Student Have you ever been to Britain on holiday? Mrs. Hay Oh, yes. I've been there many times. Student Where have you been? Mrs. Hay Well, last year we went to Scotland. * * * Student How long are you going to stay in Russia? Mrs. Hay For a week. Student Now one more question, Mrs. Hay. What are you doing tomorrow? Mrs. Hay I'm going to visit the Kremlin. * * * Student Thank you for the interview, Mrs. Hay. Mrs. Hay You're welcome. Student Goodbye Mrs. Hay. Please visit our school again. Mrs. Hay Goodbye. Student A- You are an American guest. Student B -- You are a student. Choose different partners for different topics in the dialog ue. Close your books and try to remember the dialogue and act it out. Now look back to the dialogue to see how much you have remem- bered. 1. A friend from England arrives at your house. Introduce all the members of the family to him. Invite him/ her into the living-room. Offer him/ her so- mething to eat and drink. Ask your friend about his/ her family, hobbies. Talk about your family, your hobbies and your plans for the next summer holidays. Finish the conversation. Write down the conversation. Act out the situation. Try to make your con- versation as natural as possible. Good luck! 2. Interview your English teacher. Ask him or her questions about his/ her interests, his/ her family, hobbies etc. Try to make your conversation as na- tural as possible. Good luck! Unit 1 m 
- ". ---- I , l -.. ...... . , : - After you. - Thanks a lot. Some more polite customs 1) People in Great Britain or the United States hold the door open for any person following them. They also hold the door open for someo- ne who is carrying packages. Is this custom the same in your country? Do men usually hold the door open for women? Do you hold the door open for any person following you in the Subway? 2) It is polite for Americans and Englishmen to offer to share their food, if someone they know comes up to them while they are eating. (Ho- wever, if they are eating a sandwich in a cafe, they cannot share the san- dwich!) When do people share food in your country? . 3 8 ) as ..... . "" .9 YI  '$ -IS(' -': .: -",," rJ' ....,. .... ,.... <i ow -=-: ) - ,.  /'- J ,!) 'I _   . ) .'!: .. \ , - -:;;\ \ J IL' P.:.\ '  '" \ s (" .... --- ..t. - Help yourself. - Thank you. 3. Read more. Sir, Mr., Mrs., etc. The other day in Baker Street a well-mannered foreigner appro- ac hed me. (I knew he was a foreigner because he lifted his hat to me and an Englishman only lifts his hat to women). He spoke quite good English, but I almost laughed because he began by saying, "Excuse me, gentleman...". A small mistake, but to an Englishman it is unthinkable. "Madam" and "Sir": this is the only formally correct way to address people. One even says "Ma- dam", or the abbreviated "Ma'am", when talking to the Queen. You call "Waiter!", "Waitress!", or "Porter!" if you want service. School- girls and schoolboys call their male teacher "Sir" but their female teacher "Miss", not "Madam". "Sir" and "Madam", like "Mr.", "Mrs." and "Miss" are shortened forms of "Master" and "Mistress". WORDLIST abbreviate ['bri:vi,it] - COKpal.l.laTb also r:lsu] - TalOKe approach ['pruif] - npVl6J1(11)KaTbcSJ, 3A. nOAXOAII1Tb Baker Street - 6et1Kep CTpLt1T carry ['kreri] - HeCTII1 female ['fi:meil] - >KeHI.l.lVlHa follow ['flu] - 3A. VlAT aa food [fu:d] - eAa formally ['f:mli] - oVlu.Lt1aJ1bHO hold [huld] (held, held) - 3A. npVlAep)KaTb male [meil] - M}')KVlHa offer ['f] - npeAllaraTb III I!ImII package ['prekicB] - CBepTOK porter ['p::>:t] -1. wBet1u.ap, 2. HOCLt1J1bIIIK queen [kwi:n] - KOpOJ1eBa service ['s:vis] - 06CJ1Y>KVlBaHlI1e shop-assistant ['f::>p 'sist()nt] - npOAaBeu, npOAClBI.l.lI-1u.a share [J£] - AeJ1V1TbCSJ unthinkable [An'eil)kbl] - HeBepoSJTHbli1 waiter ['weit] - oVlu.lI1aHT waitress ['weitris] - oVlu.l-1aHTKa well-mannered foreigner ['f::>rin] - VlHOCTpaHeu C XOPOWVlMII1 MaHepaMVI 
LIS - E I U T -IE Summary Some short information about five English-speaking countries. 1) The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 2) The United States of America. 3) Canada. 4) The Commonwealth of Australia. 5) New Zealand. 4. Listen, read the text about English-speaking countries. These countries have different histories, cultures, traditions, gover- nments and geography. 1) The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is si- tuated on the islands in the northwest of Europe. "O QJ The Atlantic ocean is on the north of it and the North Sea to the east. The English Channel (21 miles) separates it from the continent. Great Bri- tain is the large i,sI af1..,d . The three main parts of it are Scotland, England and Wales. Northern Ireland is situated on the island called Ireland. The population of the United Kingdom is about 60 million and its capi- tal is London. The United Kingdom is a highly developed country. Its main cities are London, Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow. J.'QJ" (..:<: '" .; 2) The United States of America (USA) is located in North Ameri- ca. It is one of the largest countries in the world. The population of the USA is about 250 million people. The USA has 50 states. Its capital is Washington D.C. (the District of Columbia). Its main cities are New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Boston. .'vv..enMte;' li It is a highly developed country. People of very many nationalities live in the USA. 'f.. "'"'\ 'i..). i ( } (t\ -t  J ., 1" - ,:;-1  __ __. .. u . ; ... .&-1 ...-:::--_"1  .:"--i \ !--. ... ..... \ ,.;-. 1) The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland \ **"1f*"*. ** *** * *** ** t* *** *   -J ) I' """ , .r , , r---\ t ,. ..",-, ,. 2) The United States of America (USA) . Unit 1 17 
3) Canada is situated in North America. Three oceans surround it: the Atlantic, the Arctic and the Pacific. The capital of the country is Ottawa. Abo- ut 30 million people live in Canada. It is a great industrial country. Its main cities are Ottawa, Toronto, Mon- treal and Vancouver. 4) Commonwealth of Australia occupies the continent of Australia and a number of istands (the main one of which is Tasmania). It includes 6 states and 2 territories with a population of about 20 million people. Its capital is Canberra and the main cities are Sidney and Melbourne. 5) New Zealand consists of several large and many smaller islands. Its population is about 4 million people. The capital is Wellington. The chief cities are Auckland, Dunedin and Nelson. It is a highly developed agricultural country. 3) Canada 4) Commonwealth of Australia  r -" i-'  '%\ ... ':'1,i; ..! ''-.f;\{; . .....c.'" " .. \'.I)..-:, '(-t-- r r: '?(.;r .. ..... \_, Uit5t . ..d'.-. 1_._.- ....."-\1'\ _  I .(, . "'(n \ I...;;;;:J "', <.." .\) Q \Q  r:r..:/ ..) J ). <_oj;<. '\\ . -. I  ,_">.. -''7'- '""\ '";-". .. <. iJ "' ",-"'._-""'i.j'......" <l'J\ ...... I.r!   T \.._ j  . \  .-,: G --_______.______:..... ...... .-/.-.....-:.,..., I 1-1 ,- &..r WORDLIST agricultural Lregri'kAltfrI] - cenbCKOX03CTBeH- Hbl Auckland [':klnd] - OKJIeHA be situated ['sitjueitid] - 6blTb pacn0J10>KeHHbIM Birmingham ['b:m i lJm] - 61-1pMVlHreM Boston ['bstn] - 60CTOH Canberra ['krenbr] - KaH6eppa channel ['tfrenl] - KaHan chart [tfa:t] -Ta6J1I11u.a Chicago [Ji'ka:gu] - VlKaro chief [tfi:f] - rJ1aBHbli1 commonwealth ['k:JmgnweI8] -coAPy>KecTBo consist of [kn'sist] - COCTOSlTb Lt13 culture ['kAltfg] - KYJ1bTYpa D. C. (District of Columbia) ('distrikt :JV k'lAmbi] - oKpyr K0J1YM6111S1 Dunedin [dA'ni:din] - AaHII1AVlH Glasgow ['gIa:sgu] - rJ1a3rO government ['gAvnmgnt] - npaBVlTeJ1bCTBO highly developed ('haili di'veIpt] - BbICOKOpa3BII1- Tbl industrial [in'dAstrigI] - npOMbIWJ1eHHbl, II1HAYC- Tplt1anbHbli1 include [in'klu:d] - BKnlOyaTb located [lu'keitid] - pacn0J10)KeHHbli1 Los Angeles [I:Js'renct3iIi:s] - nOC-AHA>f(eJ1eC 18 Unit 1  5) New Zealand .. '\ '" , (j   *" main part ['mein 'pa:t) - OCHOBHa yaCTb Manchester ['mrentfistg] - MaHyeCTep Melbourne ['melbn] - MeJ1b6YPH Montreal Lm:Jntri':I] - MOHpeaJIb nationality [nref'nrelti] - Hau.VlOHaJ1bHOCTb Nelson ['nelsn) - HeJ1bCOH New York [.nju: 'j:J:k] - HblO-OPK occupy ['kjupai] -3aHVlMaTb, OXBaTbiBaTb Ottawa [':JtWd] - OTTaBa preference epref(  )r(  )ns) - npeAnOYTeHlt1e principal ['pri nspl] - rJ1aBHbJVI. OCHOBHOVI San Francisco [.sren frn 'sisku] - CaH-ct>paHUlt1CKO separate ['sepgreit] - OTAeJ1S1Tb, pa3AeJ1S1Tb several esevrI] - HeCKOJ1bKO summary ['sAmdri] - KpaTKoe lt13nO>KeHVle surround [s'raund] - OKPY>KaTb Sydney ('sidni]- CLt1AHei1 Tasmania [trez'meini] - TacMaHVlst (OCTpOB) territory ['teritri] - TeppVlTopVlSl the English Channel ['inglif.t[ renI] - AHrJ1Lt1i1cKIt1i1 KaHan (Me>KAY O. BeJ1V1K06pVlTaHVlSI VI ct>paHUlI1ei1) Toronto [t'r:Jntg(u)] - TopoHTo tradition [trg'difn] - rpCiAVlu.Vlst Vancouver [vren'ku:v] - BaHKYBep Washington ['w:JJil)tn) - BawlI1HrToH Wellington ['welil)tgn] - BeJ1nVlHrTOH 
5. Complete the chart. Countries Georaphical Population characteristics Capital Principal towns 1 ) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6. Fill in the table with geographical names. Mind the articles. ApTKnb "the" cneAyeT ynoTpe6nTb c Ha3BaHL1S1M peK, OKeaHOB; HeT apTKl1S1 c Ha3BaHM ropOAOB, c Ha3BaHS1ML1 CTpaH; apTKnb "the" co CnO)l(HbIM Ha3BaHM CTpaH: Country Town River Ocean 0 the 0 the 0 the 0 the 7. Talk about the countries using the geographical names. 8. Which of the countries would you prefer to visit? Put them in order of preference. Why? 9. Make a back translation. Good luck! KpaTKoe onMcaHMe KpaTKafl V1HcpopMau.V1f1 a nflTV1 aHrJlOfl3bl'1HblX cTpaHax: 1) COeALtlHeHHOe KOpOJleBCTBO BeJlV1K06pV1TaHV1V1 V1 CeBepHoi1 V1pllaHAV1L-1. 2) CoeAV1HeHHble WTaTbl AMeplt1KL-1. 3) KaHaAa. 4) ABcTpallV1cKV1 COt03. 5) HOBafl 3ellaHAV1f1. Y 3TlI1X cTpaH pa3Ha lt1CTOplt1f1, KYllbTypa, TpaALtlL.J.t,1lt1, npaBlt1TellbCTBa lt1 reo- rpacplt1 . 1) CoeAMHeHHoe KoponeBcTBo BenMKo6pMTaHMM M CeBepHoM MpnaH- AMM HaXOAlt1TCS1 Ha oCTpoBax Ha cesepo-3anaAe EBponbl. ATJlaHTlt1'1eCKV1i1 OKeaH HaXOAlt1TCS1 Ha cesepe rocYAapcTBa, a CeBepHoe Mope Ha BOCTOKe. na-MaHw (21 Mlt1llfl) OTAellfleT ero OT MaTeplt1Ka. BeJ1lt1K06plt1TaHlt1 - caMbl 60llbWO OCTpOB. TpeMS1 OCHOBHbIMV1 lIaCTS1MV1 BellV1K06plt1TaHlt1lt1 S1BllS1tOTCS1 WOTllaHAlt1S1, AHrJ1L-1 lt1 Y3JlbC. CeBepHaS1 V1pllaHAV1S1 HaXOAV1TCS1 Ha OCTpOBe, Ha3blBaeMOM V1pllaHAlt151. HaCelleHlt1e COeAlt1HeHHOro KOpOJ1eBCTBa COCTaBJlS1eT OK0J10 60 Mlt1llllLtlOHOB '1ellOBeK, a era CTOJlLtlu.e 51Bll5leTCS1 nOHAOH. COeAlt1HeHHOe KopolleBcTBo - BblcoKOpa3Blt1Ta cTpaHa. Ero rllaSHble ropo- Aa - nOHAOH, 6lt1pMlt1HreM, MaH'1eCTep 111 rllaaro. 2) CoeAMHeHHble WTaTbl AMepMKM (CWA) paCnOllO)KeHbl B CeBepHoi1 AMeplt1Ke. 3TO OAHa 1113 KPynHeWlt1X CTpaH M1I1pa. HaCelleHlt1e CWA COCTaBllfleT OKOllO 250 MV1J1lllt10HOB '1ellOBeK. B CWA 50 WTaTOB. BaW1I1HrTOH (oKpyr KOllYM- 6Lt151) - CTOllLtlu.a CWA. HbtO-C1oPK, Lllt1KarO, CaH-cDpaHu.lI1CKO, nOC-AHA)KelleC, 60CTOH -: rllaSHble ropoAa. 3TO BbicoKOpa3BLtlTOe rocYAapcTBo. ntOAlt1 O'1eHb MHorlt1X Hau.LtlOHallbHocTe )KV1SYT B CWA. 3) KaHaAa paCnOllO)KeHa B CeBepHo AMepLtlKe. Tplt1 OKeaHa OMblBatOT ee: ATllaHTlt1'1eCKlt1, CeBepHbl neAOBLtlTblL1 111 Tlt1xLtl. CTOlllt1u.a CTpaHbl - OTTaBa. OKOllO 30 Mlt1ll11lt10HOB '1eflOBeK )Klt1BeT B KaHaAe. 3TO -- KpynHaS1 CTpaHa C pa3BL-1- TO npoMblwl1eHHoCTbtO. OTTaBa, TOPOHTO, MOHpeallb, BaHKYBep - ee rllaBHble ropOAa. , Unit 1 19 
II +Gro  + ,.. ,'1,.  .. 0 "-  B "' ----- 4) ABcTpanMMcKMM COlO3 3aHII1MaeT MaTepll1K ABcTpallll1111 111 P5lA OCTPOBOB (rllaBHbl 1113 KOTOPblX - TaCMaHII151). COt03 BKntOaeT B ce651 WeCTb WTaTOB 111 ,nBe Teppll1TOpll1111 C HaCeJleHlI1eM OKOllO 20 MII111llIl10HOB ellOBeK. Ero CTOllll1u.a - KaH- 6eppa, a rllaBHble ropo,na - CII1,nHe 111 Mellb6YPH. 5) HOBaH 3enaHAMH COCTOIl1T 1113 HeCKOllbKII1X 60llbWII1X 111 MHOrll1X MallblX OC- TpOBOB. Ee HaCelleHlI1e COCTaBll5leT OKOllO 4 MII1llllll10HOB ellOBeK. CTOllll1u.a - Bellllll1HrroH. rllaBHble ropo,na - OKlleH,n, AYH,nIl1H 111 HellbcoH. 3TO BbICOKopa3B- Ta51 cellbcKox0351cTBeHHa51 crpaHa. . Turn this paper over. Write down as many facts from the text as you can. Exchange papers with a partner. Great Britain 10. Listen and read this text about Great Britain. The official name for the country whose language we study is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In everyday use, however, the word "Britain" is quite possible. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland has several dif- ferent names. Some people say "Great Britain", or "Britain", or "the United Kingdom", or just "the U.K." and "G.B." Great Britain is an island that lies off the north west of Europe. It is the largest island in Europe. It is 500 km wide and nearly 1,000 km long. There is the Atlantic Ocean on the north of it and the North Sea on the east. The English Channel, which is about 21 miles, separates the U.K. from the continent. Its closest continental neighbours are France and Belgium. Recently the chan- nel Tunnel, which links France and England, has been built. There are four countries in the United Kin- gdom: England, Scotland, Wales and Nor- thern Ireland. England, Scotland and Wales are three main parts of Great Britain. Scotland is in the north. Edinburgh is Scotland's capital, it is one of the most beautiful cities in Britain. Wales is in the west. The capital city of Wales is Cardiff. Ireland, which is also an island, lies off the west coast of Great Britain. Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic (Eire) are on this is- land. Belfast is the largest city in Northern Ireland and it is its capital. , . ft . t .. .... I D .... If - ..;..! . I I WORDLIST Belgium ['belq,m] - 6eJ1brVl Belfast ['belfa:st] - 6eJ1cJ>acT Cardiff ['ka:dif]- KapAcJ> constitute ['knstitju:t] - COCTaBJlTb Edinburgh ['edinbr] - aAH6ypr get to know [get tu: Inu] - Y3HaBaTb, n03HaBaTb however [hau'ev] - KaK 6b1 H. CKOJ1bKO 6b1 HVI Irish Republic (Eire) ['airif ri'pAblik] ['eiri]- lt1pJ1aHACKa pecny6J1V1Ka (ape) 1m m!III lie off [lai :):f] - HaxOAVlTbC Ha HeKOTopOM paCCTO- HVI main [mein] - rJ1aBHbI, OCHOBHOi1, BIDKHei1WLt1i1 neighbour ['neib] - coceA separate ['sepreit] - OTAeJ1Tb several ['sevrI] - HeCKOJlbKO tunnel ['tAnI] - TYHHeJ1b 
Great Britain together with Northern Ireland constitutes the United King- dom (U.K.). The capital city of Great Britain is London which is situated in the south- east of England. London is more than a thousand years old. 11. Complete. There are 5 names of this country. Write them. 1) ................2) ................3) ................4) ................5) ................ 12. Complete the chart. There are 4 different countries in the nited Kingdom. Write them. Countries Georaphical Population Capital Principal characteristics towns 1 .............. 2 .............. 3 .............. 4 .............. -43. Put the geographical names from the text on the map. Mind the articles.  1 3  " 6 7 8 I KEY 1 - The Atlantic Ocean 2 - Scotland 3 - The North Sea 4 - Northern Ireland 5 - Edinburgh 6 - Belfast 7 - Irish Republic ( Eire) 13 8 - Dublin 9 - England 10 - Wales 11 - Cardiff 12 - London 13 - The English Channel Unit 1 21 
I -j 14. Please, try to give a back translation of this text. CoeAHeHHoe KoponeBCTBO 8enK06pTaH  CeBepHO pnaHA s:lBIls:leTCs:I oQ:>u.anbHbIM Ha3BaHeM CTpaHbl, s:l3b1K KOTOPO Mbl 3Y4aeM. 8 nOBceAHeBHo£:1 )f(3H, OAHaKO, cnOBO "6pTaHs:I" BnOIlHe npeMneMo. CoeAHeHHoe KopoIleBcTBo 8enK06pTaH  CeBepHo£:1 pIlaHA L1MeeT HeCKOIlbKO Ha3BaHii1. HeKoTopble rOBOps:lT BenVlK06pTaHs:I, n 6p- TaHs:I, n CoeAHeHHoe KoponeBcTBo, Il npOCTO "U.K."  "G.B. ". 8enK06pTaHit1s:1 - STO OCTpOB, KOTOpbl£:1 paCnOIlO)f(eH K ceBepo-3anaAY OT EBponbl. 3TO CaMbJt1 60nbwot1 OCTpOB B EBpone. Ero wpHa 500 KM, a AnHa n04T 1000 KM. C ceBepa ero OMblBaeT ATIlaHTecK£:1 OKeaH, a C BOCrOKa - CeBepHoe Mope. na-MaHW, npOTs:I)f(eHHOCTb KOToporo OKano 21 Mnl1, OTAens:ler CoeA- HeHHoe KoponeBcTBo OT MaTepl1Ka. 6nil1)f(a£:1we KOHTHeHTanbHble coceA KoponeBCTBa - cDpaHu.s:I  6enbrSl. HeAaBHo 6bln nOCTpoeH TYHHenb nOA na-MaHweM, KOTOpbl£:1 coeAHSleT cDpaHu.tO 111 AHrntO. B COCTaB COeAII1HeH- Horo KoponeBcTBa BXOAs:lT eTblpe CTpaHbl: AHrIlll1s:1, WOTIlaHAs:lJ YSJlbC  CeBepHas:l pIlaHAlI1s:1. AHrIlIl1Sl, WOTJlaHAs:I 111 Ysnbc - STO Tpll1 OC"HOBHble 4aCT 8eJlKo6pTa- H. WOTnaHASl HaXOALt1TCs:I Ha ceBepe. CTOI1u.a WOTI1aHA - 3AH6ypr. 3TO OAH 3 KpaCLt1Bet1wx ropoAoB 8eI1K06pTaH. YSI1bC HaXOATCs:I Ha 3anaAe. CTonu.a Y3I1bCa - KapAQ:>. pI1aHAs:I, KOTOpas:l TO)f(e s:lBIlSleTCs:I OCTpOBOM, J1e)f(T K 3anaAY OT no6e- pe)f(bs:l 8eI1I11K06pLt1TaH. CeBepHas:l pIlaHAs:I  pI1aHA.cKas:l pecny6IlKa (3£:1pe) HaXOAs:lTCs:I Ha 3TOM OCTpOBe. 6eIlcPacT - KPynHe£:1w£:1 ropOA B Ce- BepHo£:1 pIlaHAII1, 111 OH s:lBIls:leTCs:I ee cToIlu.e. BeI1K06pTaHs:I BMeCTe C CeBepHOVt Lt1pI1aHAe£:1 COCTaBIls:rtOT CoeAHeH- Hoe KOpOI1eBCTBO. CTOI1u.e£:1 BeI1K06pLt1TaH s:lBIls:reTCs:I J10HAOH, KOTOPbl£:1 pacnOnO)f(eH Ha JOrO-BOCTOKe AHrJH1H. llOHAOHY Y>Ke 60Jlee TblCft4H JleT. to -: " 7' .... :___T "- .  .i \ . .--" . , _o!. ... ",;If. . "' 
15 Listen and read this text about Wales. Wales is a country of hills and mountains, with deep rivers and valleys. Cardiff is the capital of Wales. The most important towns and cities are Swansea and Newport. Wales has been united with England for seven hundred years. Prince Charles became the Prince of Wales in 1969. Wales has its own Welsh language. About 20% of the people in Wales speak Welsh and children learn it in Welsh schools. Wales is famous for its production of coal and steel. Wales is an important centre for electronics and steel pro- duction. The main activities are sheep and cattle rearing, and dairy farming. Wales attracts many tourists. There are three National Parks there. The most popular sport in Wales is rugby. 16. Complete the chart. Geographical characteristics ................................................... Capital.................................................................................... . Pri nci pal towns ........................................................................ Pri ncipal industries .................................................................. La n g u age s ........................................................:...................... S po rts ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. Read and find out about the national emblem of Wales. The national emblem of Wales On the first of March each year one can see people walking around Lon- don with leeks pinned to their coats. A leek is the national emblem of Wales. The many Welsh people who live in London - or in other cities outside Wa- les - like to show their solidarity on their national day. The day is actually called Saint David's Day, after a sixth century abbot who became patron sa- int of Wales. David is the nearest English equivalent to the saint's name, Oawi. The saint was known traditionally as the Waterman, which perhaps means that he and his monks were teetotallers. A teetotaller is someone who drinks no kind of alcohol, but it does not mean that he drinks only tea, as many .... people seem to think. In spite of the leeks mentioned earlier, Saint David's emblem is not that, but a dove. No one, not even the Welsh, can explain why they took leek to symbolise their country. After all, they can't pin a dove to their coat! 18. Talk about the national emblem of Wales, mind the prepositions. .l I I' I I WORDLIST abbot ['rebgt] - a66aT I HaCTOTeJ1b activity [rek'tiviti] --AeSneJ1bHOCTb attract ['trrekt] - np1'1BneKaTb cattle rearing fkretl 'rigil)] -- pa3BeAeHVle KpynHoro poraToro CKOTa coal [kgul] -- yronb (KaMeHHbl) dairy farm ['degri 'fa:nl] -- M0J10Ha51 cpepMa deep [di:p] -- rJ1y60Kt-1 dove [dAv]--roJ1y6b electronics [ilek'trn iks] -- SJ1eKTpOHVlKa leek [li:k] -- J1YK-nope Newport [Inju:p:t] -- HblOnopT pin [pin] - npVlKaJ1blBaTb principal ['prinsgp{g}l] - rJ1aBHbl, OCHOBHOi:1 production [prg'dAkf{ g) n] - npoVl3BoACTBO rugby ['TAgbi] - per6V1 sheep rearing [Ji:p 'rigil)] -- pa3BeAeHVle oBeu. solidarity Lsli'dreriti] -- COJ1V1AapHOCTb steel [sti:l] -- CTaJ1b Swansea ['swnzi] -- r. CYOHCVI unite [ju:'nait] -- 06beAVlHTb(C) valley ['vreli] -- AOJ11'1Ha Unit 1 23 
19. Listen and read this text about Scotland. In area Scotland is more than half as big as England. The principal cities are: its capital Edinburgh and the main industrial centre Glasgow. Scottish towns look very different from English towns. Scotland was an independent Kingdom, often at war with England until 1603. In 1603 King James VI of Scotland became the King of England too, as James I, and from that time the countries were under the same monarch. In 1707 the Act of Union in- corporated Scotland with England in the United Kingdom. Although Scotland has its own language - Gaelic, most Scottish people speak English. The English language is spo- ken all over Scotland with a variety of regional accents, but all of these can be at once recognized as Scottish, with the sounds pronounced more nearly as written than in standard English. The sport of golf originated in Scotland. 20. Complete the chart. Geog rap hical characte ristics ................................................... Capital........................................................................... ......... Principal towns ........................................................................ Principal industries .................................................................. La n 9 u age s ............................................................................... Spa rts .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 21. Please, talk about the national emblem of Scotland. Why is Scotland's national emblem the thistle? Different countries have different national emblems. or symbols. For Scot- land, the thistle has been the national emblem since it was adopted by King James III, in the 15th century. There is a legend that, in the 8th century, an army of invading Danes were creep.ng up at night to attack Stirling castle, the ancient seat of the Scottish kings. The Scots sentries had no idea that an enemy was close until one of the barefoot Danish raiders stepped on a thistle and let out a yell of pain. The noise alerted the Scots, who rushed out of the castle and defeated the Da- nes in the battle that followed. WORDLIST . adopt ['dpt] - nplt1HIt1MaTb y ancient seat ['einf(  )nt] - ApeBHee MecTonpe6blBa- HVie attack ['trek] - aTaKOBaTb creep [kri:p] - nOAKpa.D.blBaTbCst Danes [deinz] -AaTlfaHe Edinburgh ['edinbr] - r. 3AVlH6ypr emblem ['emblm] -sM61leMa enemy ['enimi] - Bpar Gaelic ['geilik] - raSllbCKVli1 st3blK Glasgow ['gla:sgu] - r. rlla3rO incorporate [in'k:preit] - 06beAIt1HstTb independent Lindi'pendnt] - He3aBIt1CIt1Mbli1 invade [in'veid] - BTopraTbCst King James ['kilJ ct)eimz] - KOpOllb eMc 24 EmIl monarch ['mnk] - MOHapx originate ['ri<tineit] - npolt1CXOAIt1Tb pronounce [prlnauns] - np0lt13HOCIt1Tb recognize ['rekgnaiz] -Y3HaBaTb. nplt13HaBaTb regional accent ['ri:cBnl 'reksnt] - MecTHbli1 aK- u.eHT Scots [skts] - CKOTTb sentry ['sentri] -lfacoBoi1 sound [saund] - 3BYK standard English ['strendd 'ilJglin - HopMaTVlBHbli1 aHrJ1Lt1i1cKIt1i1 Stirling [lst:1iIJ] - CTellVlHr symbol ['simb()l] -CIt1MBOJ1 v-' thistle ['Sisl] - '"IepTOn01l0X , until [An'til] - nOKa He 
22. Read about two English towns and say what they are famous for. Cambridge Cambridge is situated at a distance of 70 miles from London. It is one of the most beautiful towns in England. The dominating factor in Cambrid- ge is its well-known University, a centre of education and learning. New- ton, Byron, Darwin and many other scientists and writers were educated at Cambridge. It has 27 colleges. A college is a place where you live no matter what profession you are trained for: so students studying literature and those trained for physics may belong to one and the same college. Every college is headed by a dean. Oxford Oxford is one of the great English universities too. Cambridge and Oxford are almost identical. They trace their long history back to the same period. By the end of the thirteenth century both universities already had colleges. Oxford and Cambridge are associated with the higher ranks of society. They have always been universities for gentlemen. - -= - ,. .1 -. ............ --..... - c.:.. -.. ..  ---- ::.-__ _  r- ... -.- _.- ,- - .. -  s. ... . .4' . 'f .:';: . . .1 f......... . t .-... - . r'JJ.. I',.,,' _' - - J, r I I ,. - . .. . · ... I .tr. . _ ...... ..f r r . r '-rw- . t ,. . . '.. ... . .  , I ... . :== L ",-, ".1 'rl" -- t'" ,rtf, . . I. - _ =. ....! I -i. ! .  ...  -.. - :t :. _  I. . .f" " "- . 0;1   · .  ..,_ .. r- . . - - \ iii1 \ " i... .- ." ,t.....!i · · , f · r' f f' " !,. . ;; .- Cambridge. The Perpendicular towers of one of the city's most famous buildings, King's College Chapel (centre), rise high above else WORDLIST alert [l :t] - nOAHS1Tb TpeBory at a distance ['dist(  )ns] - Ha paccToS1HU1 barefoot ['befut] - 60coi1 battle [bretl] - 6V1TBa be associated ['suJieitid] - accou.VlVlpOBaTbCS1 be situated ['sitjueitid] - 6blTb pacn0J10)f(eHHbIM be trained [treind] - 06yaTbcS1 belong to [bi'II)] - npHClAl1e)f(aTb K Byron ['bairen] - 6at1poH Cambridge [Ikeimbrict] - r. KeM6pA>J( college ['klict] - KOJ1lleA>J( Danish ['deinin - AaTcKillt1 Darwin ['da:win] - AapBiIIH dean [di:n] - AeKaH defeat [di 'fi:t] - HaHOCTb noprot<eHille t :; I '-.:. . ", 1. , , f \ \,\ '.:.. .,' "- It , ." . ., ... ",. .,. 4i.... ""'."'1'" :;;::-',., :,'= : II . . .' . t IJ :. \ ' '--_ I -  ..J.\ " t · . 1  ,II. · :' III . Iii'  I' .' I · · - i III I p. -  \ .' . t. .. ;'::..; 1M ...'. f f . ..... . to . \J '. II ,. . \ " . , t,  . .. J'_ ,.- " '. ,/. . . Oxford. The High Street. The street is known simply as lithe High" to Oxford residents dominating ['dmineitil)] - npe0611aAaIOLllVli1 education Ledju:'keiJ(  )n] - 06pa30BaHille head [hed] - B03rJ1aBJ1S1Tb higher ranks of society ['hai rreI)ks v s'saiti] - BblCWVle CllOVI o6LllecTBa identical [ai'dentik(  )1] - TO)f(AeCTBeHHblti let out [let aut] - 3A. i113AaBaTb Newton ['nju:tn] - HblOTOH pain [pein] - 60J1b physics ['fiziks] - ct>3i11Ka raider [reida] -yacTHiIIK HaJ1eTa rush out [rAf aut] - cTpeMTeJ1bHO 6pocaTbcSJ Lt13 step [step] - crynaTb, AeJ1aTb warill trace [treis] - 06HapBaTb, npOCJ1e)f(II1BaTb yell [jell - KpLt1K, BOnJ1b Unit 1 m 
23. Let's have a closer look at Cambridge and its university. My name is Ann Berlina. I am a student at Moscow State Linguistic Uni- versity. Last winter I spent ten days in the university city of Cambridge. It is built on a river called the Cam. Cambridge University. founded in 1209. is still one of the two best places to study in England; Oxford is the other. Students work very hard to obtain a place at "Oxbridge" - either at Oxford or at Cambrid- ge. There is great rivalry between these two ancient universities: each wants to be better than the other. but in reality both are equally good. Today. Cambridge is famous not only for its university but also because it is a very picturesque and ancient city. Many of its buildings are very old: some were built about 700 years ago. Some of the older buildings are covered with beautiful plants such as ivy. Many are surrounded by green lawns and rnulti- coloured flower-beds. Although all the colleges belong to the same universi- ty. each has its own character and style. In 1440 King Henry VI founded King's CoHge, hoping that this would make people remember him. It is still the most famous college in Cambridge because its chapel is one of the finest churc- "es in Western Europe. There are also many beautiful bridges across the Cam including the Mathematical Bridge and the Bridge of Sighs. In my view. Cambridge is a very pleasant city to live and study in. Since there are so many colleges. a large number of the city's inhabitants are young students. In the day-time the students work in the many libraries or attend lectures. while in evenings they go back to their college rooms or university lodgings. Sport plays a large part in university life. As Cambridge is on the river Carn. rowing seems to be the most popular sport. There are "boathouses" all along the river bank and early in the mornings you'li see many students rowing. whatever the weather. The best of them are preparing for the famous annual boat race against their rivals from Oxford. This race attracts much attention: thousands of people line the banks of the Thames in London to cheer both teams on. and the race is broadcast on television in many different parts of the world. I When visiting Cambridge. one should certainly take the time to have a look around the shops. There are many bookshops for students and tailors' shops where long traditional gowns are sold. At weekends shops are often crow- ded with tourists looking for souvenirs such as mugs. T-shirts and scarves, all with college crests on them. Students wear scarves of various colours in the winter when the weather is cold - at least by English standards! They often complain of the wind and rain, as most of them travel around by bicycle. WORDLIST ancient ('einfgnt] - ApeBHVli1 annual ['renjul] - e)f(erOAHbl attract [a'trrekt] - npVlBJ1eKaTb bank [breIJk] - 6eper peKVI be crowded - 3A. 6blTb 3an0J1HeHHbIM boat house ['but haus] - 3A. J10AOHa CTOHKa broadcast ['br:dka:st] - nepeAaBaTb no PaALt10 J1 TeJ1e BLt1AeHVI 10 chapel ['tfrep(  )1] - aCOBH cheer r'tfi ] - nOA6aAPVlBaTb found rfaund] - OCHOBblBaTb g:wr1[gaun] - MaHTVI inhabitant [in'hrebitnt] - )f(TeJ1b III Unit 1 ivy ['aivi] - nJ1fOLl.l lawn [l:n] - J1Y)f(aKa line [lain] - CTOTb BAOJ1b, BbICTpaViBaTbC obtain (b'tein] - nOJ1yyaTb picturesque Lpiktf'resk] - )f(VlBOnViCHbl race [reis] - copeBHoBaHe rivalry ('raiv(a)lri] -conepHecTBo row (ra u] - rpecTVI scarf [sku: f] (scarves) - wapq, sigh [sail - B3AOX surround [sa'raund] - OKp\')i(aTb tailor ['teila] - nopTHoi1 whatever [wt'eva] - KaKa 6bl HVI 6bl1la 
Foreign students from different countries enjoy their stay in Cambridge not only because of its beautiful sights, but because they have a chance to meet many English people of their own age. 24. Could you please explain why Ann writes the following: "In my view Cambridge is a very pleasant city to live and study in"? 25. Listen and read more about Great Britain. The climate of the British Isles is influenced by the Atlantic Ocean. Winters are not so cold as they can be on the continent, but summers are not so warm as they usually are on the other side of the Channel. In other words Great Britain has a mild climate. England is famous for its beautiful lawns with flo- wers. They stay green all the year round. Many people say that England looks like a large well-kept park. The animals of the British Isles look like those of north-western Europe: faxes, squirrels, hares, etc. There are about 430 kinds of birds, many of them are song-birds. The most popular hobby of Englishmen is bird-watching. People mainly live in cities and towns. The country's industry is highly developed and output of goods is larger than is needed for home use. There- fore, a great part of the industrial output is exported. The large industrial centres are Birmingham, Glasgow, Manchester, Nottingham, Liverpool. Britain has only 1 % of the world's popu- lation but is the fifth largest trading nation. It exports electrical and electronic equipment and chemicals and oil. London is the capital. It is situated on the Thames. The most famous older buildings in Lon- don include Buckingham Palace (the Sove- reign's residence in London), the Houses of Parliament (an outstanding example of ni- neteenth-century Gothic Revival architectu- re), S1. Paul's Cathedral (the second lar- gest church in Europe), Westminster Abbey (where Sovereigns are crowned), and the Tower of London. I ). .. I .' . p. If' 11 " - ! f r r .  . . \t l I t-tL.- · · ' \ .... '-.... .  .,.' " .. .- .. .,.. r  -- 51. Paul's Cathed ral WORDLIST Birmingham [b:mil)m] - r. 6V1pMII1HreM Buckingham Palace ['bAkil)m 'prelis] - 6YKVlH- reMCKVI ,QBopeu. church [tf:Ul- epKoBb, 3A. c060p complain [km'plein] - >KanOBaTbCSt crest [krest] - rep6 crowd [kraud] - TOllnVlTbCSt crown [kraun] - KopOHOBaTb etc. - VI TaK Aallee, 111 TOMY nOAo6Hoe Glasgow ['gla:sgu] - r. rna3ro Gothic Revival ['geik ri'vaiv(  )1] - rOTlt1l.1eCKOe B03pO)KAeHVle gown [gaun] - HapStA, 3A. MaHTVlSt hare [he] - 3aStu. include [in'klu:d] - BKJ11Ol.IaTb Liverpool ['livgpu:l] - r. nViBepnYllb Manchester ['mrentfist] - r. MaHl.IeCTep  . Nottingham ['n3til)am] - r. HOTTVlHreM outstanding Laut'strendil)] - BbIAalOLl.lVlCSt parliament ['pa:lglllgnt] - napJ1aMeHT poppy ['p3pi] - MaK residence ['rezid(  )ns] - MeCTO >KII1TenbCTBa, .' pe3V1AeHu.VlSt sovereign ['s3vrin] - MOHapx squirrel ['skwirl] - 6ellKa 81. Paul's Cathedral [snt p3:1z kg'ei:drl] - c060p CBStTOro naBlla the Thames [temz] - p. TeM3a tulip ['tju:lip] - TlOllbnaH wear [we] (wore, worn) - HOCVlTb well-kept [wel 'kept] - XOPOWO YXO>KeHHbli1 Westminster Abbey ['westminstg 'rebi] - BecT- MVlHcTepcKoe a66aTcTBo nit 1 27 
.... " f\ \ ", m Unit 1 ,. London is a leading art centre with many theatres, galleries, museums and concert halls. The Globe Theatre with which Shakespeare was closely asso- ciated, is being reconstructed in London. The first passenger-carrying Underground railway in the world was ope- ned in London in 1863. Recently the Channel Tunnel which links France and England has been built. Great Britain is a monarchy, but the Queen is not absolute but constituti- onal. Her powers are limited by Parliament. The Prime Minister is usually the leader of the Party that has a majority in the House of Commons. The largest political parties are the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats. Elections, in which citizens over 18 may vote, are held every five years. Since 1973, Britain has been a member of the European Community. People often say that the Englishman's home is his castle. They mean that the home is very important and personal. Most people in Britain live in hou- ses rather than flats. Most houses have a garden. An Englishman's idea of a good breakfast is the following: cereal with milk, bacon and eggs or fish, hot buttered toast with jam or mar- malade and a cup of coffee or strong tea with milk. English people drink a lot of tea. Some have tea for breakfast, tea in the middle of the mor- ning, tea after dinner, tea in the middle of the afternoon, tea at tea- time and tea with supper. The English always drink tea out of cups or mugs, never out of glasses. Englishmen always eat bread with their soup. With meat and vegetables they never eat any bread. Sports and games are very popular in England. Football, tennis and cricket matches as well as boat and horse races always attract many pe- ople. Football is the most spectacular sport. Walking is the most popular activity. '"",..... \.. -.. .. . . .... \.. . "  .. .  .. " .--:. .... ..... ........ .... (. "".  -.: .... ..... ... 'W,"  . I   I . I .- , 't \  ..c .. Ie . \ . -..... - - \ " ,  "  Above: Her Majesty the Queen Right Top: Most houses have a garden Right bottom: Football is the most spectacular sport 
..... .. - . English people like to spend their holidays on the coast Lots of them go to holiday camps. Let us remember the famous Englishmen who contributed to the world of art: architect Christopher Wren; scientist Alexander Fleming (who discovered penicillin); artists Thomas Gainsborough, John Constable, William Turner; writers and poets William Shakespeare, George Byron, Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Agat- ha Christie. Nine Noble Prizes for literature have been won by Britons inclu- ding R. Kipling (1907), T. S. Eliot (1948) and W. Golding (1983). 26. Please answer the questions. 1) What's the official name for the main country of the English language? 2) What parts does the United Kingdom consist of? 3) What is London famous for? 4) What are the most important industrial centres in Britain? 5) When did Britain join the European Community: 1943, 1955, 1973 or 1995? 6) At what age may citizens vote in Britain: 16, 17, 18 or 21? 7) Which one of the following sports and pastimes attracts the largest number of participants in Britain: football, swimming, cricket, walking, hockey, rugby? 8) Which is the largest spectator sport in Britain? 9) Do most people in Britain own their homes? 10) Which two countries does the Channel Tunnel link up? 27. You are going to visit England for a week. What are you plan- ning to see? WORDLIST absolute ['rebslu:t] - a6C0J1IOTHbI architect ('a:kitekt] - apXVlTeKTOp attract ['trrekt] - npt'lBlleKaTb bacon ['beik()n] - 6eKoH buttered ['bAtd] - HaMa3aHHbli1 MaCJ10M castle ['ka:sl] - KpenocTb cereal ['siril] - Kawa, 611IOAO 3 KYKYPY3HbiX xnonbeB Christopher Wren ['kristf Iren] - KpcTo<t>ep PeH coast [kust] -MopcKot16eper. n06epe>Kbe constitutional Lknsti'tju:fnl] - KOHcTTYU.OH- Hblt1 contribute [kn'tribju:t] - BHOCTb BKJ1aA cricket ['krikit] - KpKeT famous ['feims] - 3BecTHbI, 3HaMeHTbl George Bernard Shaw [,ct>=>:ct> 'b:nd 'f=>:] - 6epHapA Woy George Byron [ct>:cB 'bairn] -A>KoPA>K 6ai1poH holiday camp ['h=>ldi kremp] - J1arepb OTAbixa John Constable [ct>=>n 'kAnstbl] - A>KOH KOHCTe6J1 Jonathan Swift [,ct>nen swift] -A>KoHaTaH CB<t>T limit ['limit] - orpaHBaTb majority [m'ct>riti] - 60J1bWLt1HCTBO marmalade ['ma:mleid] - A>KeM, nOBA/lO match [mretf] - MaT, COCTS13aHe monarchy ['mnki] - MOHapxVlS1 mug [mAg] - KPY>KKa Oscar Wilde ['sk 'waild] - OCKap Yai1J1bA own [un] - BllaAeTb . party ['pa:ti] - napTVlS1 passenger-carrying ['presincB] - nacca)l(pcKVli1 personal ['p:snl] -l1Hblt1 powers ['pauz] - BJ1aCTb. nOllHOMOS1 race [reis] - COCTS13aHe B CKOpOCT (roHKVI, cKaK) Robert Louis Stevenson ['r=>bt 'lu:i: 'sti:vnsn]- P06epT llblOc CTBeHcoH soup [su:p] - cyn strong-tea [lstrlJ] - KpenKi1 ai1 tea-time ['ti: Itaim] - BpeMS1 A/lfl aS1 the Conservatives [kn's:v(  )tivz] - KOHcepBaTO- pbl (napTVlfI KOHcepBaTopoB) the Globe Theatre ['glub 'eit] - TeaTp "rJ106yc" the Labour Party - J1ei160pcTcKaS1 napTS1 the Prime Minister - npeMbep-MHCTp Thomas Gainsborough [Itms 'geinsbr] - TOMac reHc6opo underground railway ['And'graund 'reilwei]- nOA3eMHafi >KeJ1e3Hafi Aopora (MeTpo) Walter Scott ['wlt 'skt] - BaJ1bTep CKOTT William Shakespeare ['wiljm 'feik,spi] - Yl1bS1M WeKcnp William Turner ['wiljm It:n] - YJ1bS1M TepHep Im!III m 
III Unit 1 28. Try to make a back translation, please. Ha KnVlMaT 6pVlTaHCKVlX OCTpOBOB BnVlS1eT ATnaHTVl4ecKVli1 OKeaH. 3V1Mbl He TaKVle xonOAHble, KaKVlMVI OHVI MOryT 6blTb Ha KOHTVlHeHTe, a neTO He TaKoe Ten- noe, KaKVlM OHO 06bl4HO 6blBaeT no APyrytO CTOPOHY KaHana. ApyrVlMVI cnOBaM, KnVlMaT BenVlK06pVlTaHVIVI MS1rKVli1. AHrnS1 cnaBVlTCS1 CBOVlMVI 4YAeCHblMVI ra30HaMVI C lI.BeTaMVI. raaOHbl OCTatOT- CS1 aeneHblMVI Kpyrnbli1 rOA. MHorVie ntOAVI rOBopS1T, 4TO AHrnVlS1 BblrnS1AVlT KaK 60nbwoi1 xopowo YXO>KeHHbl napK. )f(VlBOTHbli1 MVip 6pVlTaHcKVlx OCTpOBOB TOT >Ke, 4TO VI Ha ceBepO-3anaAe EBPO- nbl: nVlCbl, 6enKV1, 3ai1l1.bl VI T. A. 3AeCb 06V1TaeT OKono 430 BViAOB nTVllI., MHorVie Via HViX - neB4V1e. CaMoe nonynS1pHoe x066V1 aHrnVl4aH - Ha6ntOAaTb 3a nTlt1l1.aMVI. AHrnVl4aHe rna8HbiM o6paaoM )t(V1BYT B ropOAax. npOMblwneHHocTb CTpaHbl BblcoKopa3BVlTa, VI npoMblwneHHblx TOBapOB npOVl3BOAVlTCS1 60nbwe, 4eM Tpe6y- eTCS1 AnS1 nOTpe6neHVlS1 BHYTPVl CTpaHbl. nOSTOMY 3Ha4V1TenbHaS1 4aCTb npOMblW- neHHoi1 npoAYKlI.VIVI sKcnopTVlpyeTcS1. 60nbwVle npOMblwneHHble lI.eHTpbl- 6V1p- MVlHreM, rna3ro, MaH4ecTep, HOTTVlHreM, nViBepnynb. HaceneHVle 6pV1TaHVlVI COCTaBnS1eT 8cero nVlWb OAVlH npOll.eHT MVipOBoro, HO rocYAapcTBo 3aHVlMaeT nS1Toe MeCTO no 06beMY npoAaBaeMo npoAYKlI.V1V1. OHO sKcnopTVlPyeT sneKTpoo60PYAoBaHVle, sneKTpoHVlKY, xVlMV14ecKYtO npOAYKlI.VlfO  HecpTb. CTOnVlll.a - nOHAOH. OH pacnOnO>KeH Ha TeMae. B 4V1cno HaVl60nee t.13BeCT- HblX CTapVlHHblX aAaHVli1 nOHAoHa BXOAS1T 6YKVlHreMCKit1 ABOpell. (peaVlAeHlI.it1S1 MOHapxa B nOHAoHe), aAaHit1e napnaMeHTa (BbIAatOw.VIcS1 06pa3ell. apxVlTeKTYPbl rOTVl4eCKoro B03pO>KAeHVlst XIX BeKa), co60p CBToro naBna (BTOPOi1 no BenVl4V1- He c060p B EBpone), BecTMVlHcTepcKoe a66aTcTBo (aAecb npOXOAVIT KOpOHall.lt1S1 MOHapxoB) VI nOHAoHcKVlt1 Taysp. nOHAOH - BeAyw.Vli1 KynbTYPHbli1 lI.eHTp co MHO>KeCTBOM TeaTpOB, ranepe, MY3eeB VI KOHlI.epTHblX aanOB. Cei14ac B nOHAoHe VlAeT peKOHCTpYKlI.VlS1 TeaTpa «rno6yc», C KOTOpblM TeCHO CBst3aHO VlMst WeKcnVlpa. nepBaS1 B MVipe naCCa>KVlpCKaS1 nOA3eMHaS1 )f(ene3HaS1 Aopora 6blna OTKpblTa B nOHAoHe B 1863 rOAY. HeAaBHo nOA na-MaHweM 6bln nOCTpoeH TYHHenb, KOTO- pbl coeAVlHS1eT C3)paHlI.VltO VI AHrnVlIO. BenVlK06pVlTaHVlS1 - aTO MOHapxVlS1, HO BnaCTb KoponeBbl He a6COntOTHaS1, a KOHCTVlTyu.VlOHHaS1. Ee nonHOM04V1S1 orpaHVl4eHbi napnaMeHTOM. npeMbep-MVlHVlCTP 06bl4HO S1BnS1eTCS1 nViAepOM napTit1V1, KOTopaS1 VlMeeT 60nbWVlHCTBO B nanaTe 06- W.VlH. KpynHet1wVle nonVlTVl4eCKVle napTVlVI - KOHcepBaTVlBHaS1, ne6opVlcTcKaS1 VI nV16epanbHo-AeMoKpaTVl4ecKaS1. Bb160Pbl, B KOTOpblX MorYT npVlHVlMaTb Y4aCTlt1e rpa>KAaHe cTapwe 18, npoBoAS1TCS1 Ka)I(Able rlS1Tb neT. C 1973 rOAa 6pVlTaHlt1S1 stB- nS1eTCst 4neHOM EBponecKoro coo6w.ecTBa. ntOAVI 4aCTO rOBopS1T, 4TO AOM aHrnVl4aHVlHa - STO ero KpenOCTb. OHlt1 VlMefOT BBV1AY, 4TO AOM stBnsteTCst 4eM-TO 04eHb Ba)f(HbIM VI nVl4HbIM. 60nbWVlHCTBO nfOAe B 6pVlTaHVl1I1 npeAn04V1TatOT >KVlTb B AOMax, a He B KBapTVlpax. 60nbw1HCTBO AO- MOB VlMeeT caA. XopowVli1 3aBTpaK nO-aHrn1l1i1cKVI STO: Kawa Vl3 xnonbeB C MonOKoM, 6eKoH 1-1 S1u.a VlnVl pbl6a, rOpst4V1e, nOA>KapeHHble C MacnoM, nOMTit1KVI xne6a C A)f(eMOM VlnVl nOB1I1AJlOM VI 4aWKa Kocpe VlnVl KpenKoro LJaS1 C MonOKOM. AHrnVl4aHe nbfOT MHoro 4aS1. HeKOTopble nbtOT 4ai1 Ha aa8TpaK, 4a n03AHVlM YTPOM, 4a nocne 06eAa, 4ai1 8 cepeAVlHe AHS1, ljai1 8 cneu.VlanbHO OTBeAeHHoe AJlS1 4aS1 8peMS1, 4aC1 80 BpeMS1 Y>K1I1Ha. AHrnVlljaHe 8cerAa nbtOT 4ai1 Vl3 LJaWeK VlnVl KPY>KeK VI HViKorAa Vl3 CTaKaHOB. AHrnVl4aHe BcerAa eAstT cyn C xne60M. C MstCOM VI oBow.aMVI OHVI HlI1KOrAa He eAS1T xJle6a. CnopT VI 1I1rpbl OljeHb nonynstpHbl B AHrJlVlVl. C3)YT60nbHble MaT4V1, copeBHOBa- HVlS1 no TeHHVlCY 111 KpVlKeTY TaK >Ke, KaK copeBHOBaHVlS1 Ha nOAKax VI CKa4KVI, Bcer- Aa npVlBneKatOT MHoro JltOAei1. C3)YT60n - caMbli1 3penVlw.Hbl BViA cnopTa. ne- weXOAHbie nporynKVI - HaVl60Jlee nonynS1pHbl. 
AHfl1L1l1aHe 11K>6T npOBOAL1Tb OTnYCK Ha n06epe)f(be. MHOfL1e Lt13 HL1X ye3)f(atOT B llarep OTAbIXa. )J.aBaTe BCnOMHL1M L1MeHa BbIAaK>w.L1XC aHfl1L14aH. KOTOpble BHeCl1L1 BKl1aA B ML1pOBYK> KYllbTYPY: apXL1TeKTOp KpL1CTOcpep PeH; Y4eHbl A11eKCaHAP Q)lleML1Hf (TOT, KTO OTKpbll1 neHL1LJ.L11111L1H); XYAO)l(HL1KL1 TOMaC reHc6opo, )J.)f(OH KOHCTe61lb. YL111bM TepHep; nL1CaTellL1  nOSTbl YL111bM WeKCnL1p, OProK 6apOH, Ballb- Tep CKOTT, P06epT nbK>'iC CTBeHCOH, )J.)f(OHaTaH CBL1cpT, OCKap Yal1bA, A)f(OProK 6epHapA Woy, AfaTa KPCTL1. AeBTb Ho6el1eBCKL1X npeML1 no IlTepaType 6bl1l0 3aBoeBaHO 6pTaHLJ.aM; t'1 CpeAL1 HX 6b111 P. Kt'1nl1L1Hf (1907), T. A)f(. 3J1OT (1948) t'1 B. rOJ1AHf (1983). lIF I I 29. Listen and read. The "Melting Pot" The United States is called a "melting pot", or salad bowl/mixed salad because people from all over the world have mixed together to create mo- dern American society. The earliest immigrants came from every country of the world. """ I, -' ('  ( - . .  . _ /.! 4\ ?. 1,1 . ,,- I 'f' ,',; I . ' I , '" . i\oO  " \ <II<>!j 1,., i(f «"JFr'i "i 1 :-;\ {' t \  t' · "= i,!'-- .:::t  - . \) ...  ,:i ).,. ) ,,.:  !,,  -',' - ,',   \- . ;' ,1J.f; IJU .-... , "I 0: 1  ". "\.. .. .-. , \ £ .--  I - " ,.... r q,. '\ , , ,... -,  ... ..... , ,..- " -. '" 4, WORDLIST create [kri:'eit] - C03AaBaTb immigrant ('imigrgnt] - VlMMVlrpaHT, nepeCelleHeu. melting pot ['meIth) pt] - ropwoK. B KOTOpOM Bce nepeMeWaJlOCb mix [miks] - CMeWVlBaTb modern ['m::>d( g )n] - cOBpeMeHHbli1 salad bowl ['sreIgd bgul] - MViCKa C CaJlaTOM society [sg'saigti] - 06L1leCTBO ImDI 31 
m I!ImII What is your nationality? People from many countries live in the United States because this country is a nation of immigrants. Here are the names of some of the nations people come from and their nationalities Notice that many nationalities end in -ese, -ish, -ian, or -an. Can you add more nations and nationalities to eacr !:st? Nation Nationality Burma ['b:m] Burmese [b:'mi:z] China [,tfain] Chinese [tfai'ni:z] Japan [cUlpren] Japanese Lctrep'ni:z] Lebanon ['lebnn] Lebanese [.leb'ni:z] Portugal [Ip:tug(  )1] Portuguese [.p:tju'gi:z] Vietnam Lvjet'nrem"vjet'na:m] Vietnamese Lvjetn'mi:z] Denmark ['denma:k] England ['ioglnd] Ireland ['ailnd] Poland ['pulnd] Sweden ['swi:dn] Turkey ['t:ki] Danish ['deinif] English ['iOglif] Irish ['airif] Polish ['puliJJ Swedish ['swi:diJ] Turkish ['t:kiJ] Armenia [a:'mi:nj] Brazil [br'zil] Canada ['krend] Colombia [k'lmbi] Ecuador ['ekw,d:] Egypt ['i:cUipt] Ethiopia Li:ei'upi] Hungary ['hAogri] India ['indi] I ndonesia Lindu'ni:zi] Iran [i'ra:n] Italy ['itli] Panama [.prenlma:] Russia ['rAf] Tahiti [t'hi:ti] Armenian [a:'mi:njn] Brazilian [br'ziljn] Canadian [k'neidjn] Colombian [k'lmbin] Ecuadorian [,ekw'd:rin] Egyptian [i'ctipf(  )n] Ethiopian Li:ei'upin] Hungarian [hAo'g£rin] Indian ['indin] Indonesian [Iindau'ni:zian] Iranian [i'reinin] Italian [rtreljn] Panamanian ['pren'meinin] Russian ['rAfn] Tahitian [ta1hi:tjan] Chilean ['1Jilin] Cuban ['kju:bn] Dominican [dulminikn] Chile ['1jili] Cuba ['kju:b] The Dominican Republic [dau'minikan rrpAblik] Germany ['cUa:mni] Kenya ['ki:nj, 'kenj] Korea [k'ri:] Mexico ['meksi,ku] Puerto Rico [lpW:tu 'ri:ku] Uganda [ju:'grend] The United States of America (U.S.A.) [ju:'naitid 'steits av a'merik] American ['merikn] Venezuela Lveni'zeila] Venezuelan Lveni'zeilan] What is your nationality? What country are you from? German ecB:mn] Kenyan ['ki:njn] Korean [k'ri:n] Mexican ['meksikn] Puerto Rican ['pw:tu 'ri:kn] Ugandan [ju:'grendn] 
II Turn this paper over. Write down as many nationalities as you can remember. Exchange papers with a partner. Now look back to the text to see how much you have remembered. 30. Listen and read. The United States of America (the USA) In every life people call this country America. Do we know much of its past? Part I. America in the past Many hundred years ago on the territory of the present day America lived the red-skin Indians. They hunted animals and fished. grew corn and tobac- co. In the middle of the 15th century some European countries began to send their ships to discover new sea routes to far off lands. One of these explorers was Christopher Columbus from Spain. who sailed with his crew on 33 small ships for 3 months. When they saw at last an unknown land they thought that it was India. That is why they called the local people living there red-skin In- dians. But Columbus was mistaken. It was an island near North America. This discovery took place on the 12th of October 1492. That is why in 1992 Ame- rica celebrated its SOOth anniversary. But this new land got its name "Ameri- ca" a little later when an Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci described it in his writings in 1499. rYJ. ") <-_t ' -., - '----- v.-   , {(r,li ',;1 I , . , \ \ ' '-= .. .,....... c:..... . '...   - .!". ( . -. -z. - --::-.:....., _ .... .............. ......  ,..0& .. _At Since that time different European coun- tries sent their people to North America to trade with the natives and to look for gold, silver. fur and ot.her things there. In 1620 more than one hundred Englishmen left their country forever and went to America on bo- ard the ship "Mayflower" to live and work the- re. Their voyage lasted for many weeks and was very hard. At last they reached the coast of America and began to build a village cal- led New Plymouth. Later on. more and more people from many countries came to live in America. En- gland considered these new territories as its colonies and soon the newcomers began to fight for their independence. The biggest war lasted from 1775 up to 1783. Commander- in-chief of the North American army was WORDLIST anniversary Lren i IV:S(  )ri] - rOAOBLl.\VlHa European [jur'pi:n] - eBponei1cKVli1 board [b:d] - 60pT (cYAHa) explorer [iks'pl:rg] - VlCCJleAOBaTeJlb celebrate ('selibreit] - npa3AHOBaTb independence Lindi'pendns] - He3aSVlCVlMOCTb entury ['sentfuri]- CTOJleTVle, BeK last [la:st] - AJlVlTbC coast [kust].- n6epe)f(,be .. native ['neitiv] - MecTHbli1 )f(VlTellb Commander-n-chlef [k ma:ndlntfl:f] - rJ1aSHO- newcomer ('nju:,kAm] - BHOBb npVl6b1BwVli1 KOMaylOLl.\''. . reach [ri:tf] - AOCTVlraTb consider [kn sld] - paccMaTpBaTb red-skin [redskin] - KpacHoKo)J(e corn [k:n] - 3epHo route [ru:t] - Mapwpyr crew [kru:] - SKLt1na)J( Kopa6J1 territory ['teritri] - TeppTOpLt1 discover [dis'kA v] - OTKpblBaTb troop (tru:p] - BOi1cKO, OTPA discovery (dis'kA v(  )ri] - OTKpblTVle voyage ['viicE] - nyrewecTBVle 2 KHI-1ra A/l 4TeHI-1 "K Y4e6HI-1KY «C4aCT/l. aHr/l.-2» ImIIII m 
George Washington. His troops won this War for Independence and on July 4, 1776 the famous Declaration of Independence was signed by 13 United States of America. George Washington was elected to be the first American President. Yellowstone Park ,1 \ ." \ \ .. *' .".  Skyscrapes in New York WORDLIST capital rkrepitl] - cToIlu.a chamber rtfeimb] - naIlaTa custom ['kAstm] - 06bllfati desert ['dezt] - nYCTblHSI elect [i1lekt} - Bbl6Lt1paTb equal [Ii:kwl] - paBH5JTbC5J Eureka [julri:k] - SBpKa federal ['fedrl] - cpeAepaJ1bHbli1 golden poppy ['guldn 'ppi] - 30J10T0t1 MaK motto [Imtu] -AeB3 nature ['neitf] - nppoAa original ['rict5anl] - nepBOHalfaJ1bHblt1 parliament ['pa:lamant] - napJ1aMeHT m Unit 1 Part II. America today At present the USA is a highly develo- ped industrial and agricultural country. It is rich in coal, oil, iron and natural gas. It exports a lot of raw materials, industrial and agricultural products. People enjoy the wonders of nature practically in every state. The Appalachi- ans and the Rocky Mountains, forests, pla- ins, prairies and even deserts, wonderful lakes, waterfalls and rivers cover the Ame- rican territory that equals about 9.4 milli- on square kilometers. Among the most fa- mous sites of interest are the Great Lakes. Niagara falls, the Golden Gate bridge in San Francisco and others. There are manv beautiful National parks and protected areas of wilderness in America. The population of the USA is about 250 million people of many nationalities. Some of the biggest cities are New York, Chica- go, Philadelphia, San Francisco and ot. hers. There are many very tall buildings ir them that really scrape the sky, that's wh) they are called skyscrapers. The capital of the country is Washingtor D. C. (the District of Columbia). The USA i a federal republic. The American parliamen (called Congress) has two chambers: thE House of Representatives and the Senate The flag of the USA has 13 red anc white stripes representing the original 1  states and 50 stars - for each of the 5( states of the country. Each state has it plain [plein] - paBHVlHa population Lppjulleif( a)n] - HaCeJ1eHLt1e prairie ['prcari] - npepVlSl represent Lrepri1zent] - npeACTaBJ1S1Tb representative [.repri1zentativ] - npeACTaBVITeIlb scrape [skreip] - CKpeCT Senate esenit] - ceHaT square [skwca] - KBaApaTHblt1 star [sta:] - 3Be3Aa stri pe [st ra i p ] - nOJ1oca tradition [tra'd iJan] - TPClAVlU.SI valley quail rvreli kweil] - nepeneIl wonder rWAnda] -lfYAO 
.... "", . \ \ - -  - .,.. , \ . - ... .  .... . '""' . - . ,j..... . . ..... . ... .........: "&.I: . ., - .. . , . - ....  .. 1 . , .}.: .. ,.. .... N " . . r- -.. , . . : . ,. . .... _ ''!' . 1.. .... .".: - ., . - 1 ..- . .... ... -..... . .. :..... ":'... . ;., " .. .... · i'f ' .-. . --..... . Firework on Independance Day f-c .: .4- '. . ....  ......, ... , -  ...... .\,. . ... I - J ...J_ Independence Day celebration WORDLIST amount [Imaunt] - KOJ1lfeCTBO await [d'weit] - O)KAaTb birth [b:8] - pO)KAeHe essay [e'sei] - olfepK go on [gu :)n] - npOAOJ1)KaTb harvest ['ha:vist] - YPo)Ka line [lain] - crpolfKa . .' '. . national motto, bird and flower as its sym- bol. For instance, California's motto is II I've found it! (Eureka):' Its state bird is Valley Quail and flower - Golden Poppy. America as any other country has its own customs. traditions, and holidays. For instan- ce. on the 4th of July they celebrate Indepen- dence Day that gave birth to the American nation. At the end of November America has Thanksgiving Day which was celebrated for the first time in 1621 when the first colonists from England got their first good harvest. Young people enjoy two other holidays - Halloween (on October 31) and St. Valenti- ne's Day (on February 14). No doubt, a gre- at amount of information about the USA is awaiting the future learners of this country. They will learn of the activity and life of Ame- rican Presidents. the USA's great writers, poets, artists, scientists, musicians. film stars and other outstanding people. Let it be only the first line of a long essay on the USA. But as an English proverb says "A good beginning is half the battle. II Go on studying America! Goodbye. for the present. 31 . Please write down and then say what historical events are associ- ated with the following dates: 12 October 1492 1861 1499 1865 1620 1863 1775-1783 1992 4th of July 1776 32. On the inside back cover of the "Happy English-2" textbook there is a map of the American states with their mottos. Choose three which you like. 33. Create a motto for the place whe- - re you live. nation ('neif(  )n] - Hau.st no doubt ['daut] - HeCOMHeHHO outstanding (.aut'strendiJ)] - BblAaIOLlli1Cst proverb ['prvb] - nOCJ10BVIa scientist ['saintist] - YlfeHbl ThanksgMng Day ['8reJ)ks,9ivil)] -.QeHb 6JJafQD.apeHVISI I!lmII III 
Ii\,",  ..""... . 't .   .. ' . . )( ," .----. -::-,!;;.  t . < "'i'. -._ .... . \ ,..,...... -.'  - \.1:a. t...: \., . f..r :t '\  ." ", -r  . u ---. t..... 1- ......... - - ":..f . . _!" :.-..... - .... ..- ......- ..........- .... ......".... . .... :"4..:... )... 't , ' ) r r:; ...--:::.:--. . : Ij;? ..... ...-  3 . Listen and read more about the USA. If you want to go from San Francisco to New York in a car. you must ride more than three thousand miles. It takes over three days and nights. In California, where you begin your trip, the climate is usu- ally mild all year. "California" is a Spanish word meaning "heat of the ovens". Slightly south of the route that your car follows is the famous fruitful area. Californian oranges, grapefruit and lemons, as well as many other fruits and vegetables are ship- ped all over the United States and to other parts of the world. Soon, however, you leave these fertile plains and go up into the Sierra Nevada mountains, with their snow-capped peaks and clear mountain lakes. As your car goes further east, you cross the Salt Lake desert. For miles and miles you will see nothing but salt and salt. Your car crosses the flat plains of Wyoming, which stretch out for miles and miles, covered with short grass and sagebrush. This is mainly sheep and cattle country, the land of the cowboys. As you cross it, you may wonder where the people of America are. From time to time you may see a few cattle scattered over the plain, or the wagon of a sheep her- der, but most of the country is empty. As your car crosses Nebraska, you gradually leave this empty country and enter the rich farming region of Ameri- ca. The land becomes fertile and well watered, and more trees appear. Nebraska has many golden wheat fields. In Iowa and Illinois, wheat and corn are important products, and much livestock is raised. After two days, your streamlined, air-conditioned car arri- ves in Chicago. Chicago, with a population of more than three and a half million, is the second largest city in the United Sta- tes. It is a centre of industry for the middle part of the coun- try. In Pennsylvania and New Jersey you can find factories of nearly every type - textile and pottery. steel and chemical. WORDLIST air-conditioned ['e kn,difnd] - C KOHAVlLJ.VlOHe- pOM appear ['pi] - n051BnS1TbC51 arrive ['raiv] - npil16blBaTb, npVle3>KaTb California Lkreli'f:nj] - KaJ11cpopHIt151 cattle [kretl] - KpynHbli1 poraTbl CKOT corn [k:n] - KYKYPY3a empty ('empti] - nycToi1 famous [feims] -1t13BeCTHbl, 3HaMeHIt1Tbli1 fertile ['f:tail] - nJ10AOpoAHbli1 gradually ['grre<t3uli] - nOCTeneHHO herder ['h:d] - nacTYX important [im'p:tnt] - Ba>KHbli1, 3HaYVlTellbHbl industry ['indstri] - npoMblwneHHocTb 1 kilometre = 0.62 miles mild [maild] - M51rKIt1i1 mile [mail] - MIt1J151 III I!JmII oven ['Avn] -AYXOBO wKacp, AyxoBKa peak [pi:k] - BepWIt1Ha (OCTpOKOHeYHa51) ride [raid] (rode, ridden) - exaTb sagebrush ['seictbrAn - nonblHb Salt Lake ['s:lt leik] - COJ1T-Jlei1K San Francisco [.sren frn'sisku}- CaH-<bpaHLJ.VlCKO scatter ('skret] - pa36pacblBaTb Sierra Nevada [si'er ni'vred] - Cbeppa-HeBaAa streamlined car ['stri:mlaind ka:] - MaWIt1Ha 06Te- KaeMoi1 cpOpMbl stretch out ('stretf aut] - npOCTlt1paTbC51 wagon ['wregn] - cpyproH water ['w:t] - nOJ1i11BaTb wheat [wi:t] - nweHVlu.a wonder ['wAnd] - nOIt1HTepeCOBaTbC5I Wyoming [wai'umil)] - BaoMIt1Hr 
This is the richest industrial region of the country, with more city dwellers and a larger foreign-born population than anywhere else in the United States. Fi- nally you arrive in the city of New York, which is one of the largest in the world. 35. Please trace on the map the route from San Francisco to New York in a car. Seattle /. / . ("-.. ..' /'-;''It:' , .--. ....:'. _r"l rt', it1" , t .,,'" f' ,,. \f' t . - ..\IRCRAFT I:;\jDtSTRY  . I '" ./ C't.R lOl"SrR\' . J -........ ,\ \ ;,A.. San Lake City LU " Ii V WI:':S" --- Minneapolis . 1fI?7"i",. t . .... i\\\tAi ; In San Francisco 1 . ,'. o: {)S  Denver :.t.. " l,:,\ BOLl ,'WOOD · )"'" ;l. · .. \' , Los Angeles G:' 1\  . . \ '-- ,..s2\\ BO 1-:'). \-= >\.R'\,\\"RS &. \ "\HI-\ '\8 ,fJ \'" !;( - . , ' New York Chlca Detroit - 1--'  STATLEOf IIBERf\ HII.-rl]" . --- ..._. , '" : 'i ..,'I'''.l'-t .. """+1 t l-'r "":a _ .. c "':.;_:A...",,:,, Washington C:\p\TOI 1 ---- 8R/\II.\ '.1 L,'COL\  .. .  L & .. ;? f t\ \: .:P J  Springfield Nashville CI\'II. W/'\R .......... BE(,.\ IIERE --- Las Vegas . AUanta .t Charlston f -=. , .. i \.A''''EO I f ....--  - "-' SPACECR..\FT CE:'\TER --...... New Urlean 'ill -- Houston f:"\'\f':l)y Cape Canaveral SP.\CEC'E'1 Miami . . 36. Take a journey from New York to San Francisco. Choose a kind of transport, a route. Tell about your impressions from the journey. ""' 37. Imagine you are the owner of a travel agency. What route could you suggest for travelers who visit your region? Make a route from your city to Vladivostok. 38. What would you say about your agency if you had an opportunity to speak about it on T.V. or over the radio? Advertize your agency in a newspaper. I!DI m 
Our country is very large in size. Imagine yourself in a plane flying over its territory. You will see wonderful sights: blue lines of the rivers, blue mirrors of the lakes and seas, green pat- ches of the meadows, plains and forests and mountains. You will enjoy every minute of your flight. What kind of scenery is typical for the place where you live? Which of the- se words might be used to describe the pla- ce where you live? beautiful forests or woodland peaceful ancient buildings quiet large port crowded small harbour noisy seaside/ lakes busy green valley ancient grassy hills historical mountain region wild Our land is remarkable for its wealth. The- re is gold, platinum, diamonds, coal, nonfer- rous metals, peat, oil, gas and wood. Four beautiful seasons: winter, spring, summer and autumn are distinctly expressed in our country. The nature and peoples inhabiting our country are given the most important thing - faith. It is great faith that brings us together. It's faith that creates a harmony with the "world of the spirit". It's faith that makes us patient and understanding, the qualities which help us live and survive in the most hard times. The national property which makes us pro- ud is its greatness: talented scientists, experts, famous philosophers, outstanding inventors, musicians, writers, artists. RE T · - I" HI . Itl'S  J -  I: '-  " .. .- - ...: " - - .":--. .n&..  . . 1"" , t. . . ..I' . I .. ..-.----......-..--- ,...,--. ..... . '. .a , .... .. . " .. ,1'  It - , ... ., 4! I ... I -- WORDLIST bring together [brilJ tlgeo] - 3A. 06beAHTb distinctly [dis'tilJktli] - OTeTJ1V1BO expert ['eksp:t] - cneu.VlaJlVlCT express [ik'spres] - BblpIDKaTb faith f'fei8] - Bepa flight [flait] - nOJleT greatness ['greitnis] - BeJlll1lI1e imagine [i'mrecBin] - npeACTaBL"Tb inhabit [in'hrebit] - HaCeJ1Tb mirror ['mir] - 3epKaJlO mountain ('mauntin] - ropa national property ['nreJnl 'prJpti] - Hau.Lt10HaJ1b- Hoe AOCToHlI1e 38 'Unit 1 551 Glory to all of them dead or living! nonferrous ['nJn'fers] - u.BeTHble MeTaJ1J1bl oil ['Jil] - HeQ>Tb patient ['peif{  )nt] - TepneJ1V1Bbl peat [pi:t] - TOpQ> peoples ['pi:plz] - HapOAbl plain [plein] - paBHVlHa proud [praud] - rOPAbli1 quality ['kw3liti] - KaeCTBO sights [saits] - BVlAbl spirit ('spirit] - AYX survive [s'vaiv] - Bbl)f(lI1BaTb wealth [lwetS] - 60raTcTBo 
A thing of beauty is a joy forever. Part I. Nature in Russia Listen and enjoy yourself. It is dawn. "The first appearance of daylight in the morning." Everything is coming out to meet the Sun's light. The meadows, forests, ri- vers, and lakes are feeling happy at this moment showing their fresh and vital bea- uty. Flowers, birds, animals and people - all of them are filling themselves with the great po- wer of the sun expressing it in their own langu- age. The flowers are showing their colours: yellow. red. orange, violet. rose, white, pink. The birds are singing their wonderful songs; the animals are silently observing the surroundings. The butterflies and bees are dancing in the air. Every creature on earth is thankful to the Sun. Indeed, there is a lot to be thankful for. This is beauty. This is joy forever! 39. HanMwMTe COMHeHMe: "PaccseT". 8aM nOMO)l(eT 3TO CAe- naTb 3aMeaTenbHaSi MY3blKa M. MycoprcKoro - BCTYnneHMe K onepe "XOBaHI1\MHa" "PaccseT Ha MocKBe-peKe". , 40. He XOTMTe nM nepeaeCTM 3TM CTMxoTBopeHMSI? BMAeHMe Ha xonMe 836ery Ha XOllM 1I1 ynaAY B Tpasy. *** *** Bce xoeT neTb VI CllaBTb 6ora: 3ap51. VI llaHAblW, VI KOBblllb, lt1 llec,  nOlle, VI Aopora, V1 BeTpOM 3bI611eMa51 nbillb. ctJeJ1.op Conory6 ...nI0611tO TBOIO, POCCVl51. CTapVlHY... *** ...nI06nlO TBOVI Vl36YWKVI VI BeTbl, V1 He6eca, ropw.Vle OT 3H051, lt1 wenOT VlB Y OMYTHO SOAbl. n1061110 HaseK, AO BeHoro nOKo51... POCCVl51, PYCb! XpaHVI ce651, xpaHVI!.. HUKonau Py6OB WORDLIST a joy for ever - BeYHa paAOCTb be thankful ['8rel)kful] - 6blTb 61larOAapHbiM beauty ['bju:ti] - KpaCOTa bee [bi:] - nyeJ1a butterfly ['bAtflai] - 6a60YKa creature ['kri:tf] - cyecTBo enjoy oneself [in'cti wAn'self] - HaCJ1a)f(AaTbC5I fresh [fref] - CBe)f(l1 I light [lait] - CBeT observe [b'Z:V] - Ha6J1IO.QaTb power [Ipau] - CVlJ1a, SHeprVl51 silently ['sailntli] - MOnyanlt1BO surroundings [s'raundiI)z] - oKp}')KalOa Aei1- CTBL.1TenbHOCTb vital ['vaitl] - >K3HeHHbli1 wonderful [IW Andful] - YYAecHbli1 Unit 1 39 
, , ' I ,,"\. f;. ; . ...-\0; " . . f f '  . .,.. I, .." ' "}.. \ . j , . , c"" t .' ;: f" 101 ''if! Ie", , 1 . ...to. ", r ,Y .' i  " ',: " ., J .1... -: ., t,  . '... t, "''lL. .: t"  ,.\; J If , " -, ...:... I'.. ,''.. · ., l t r It' J rr '.''' t. ., , . " " . ,'" ,. 1'. ,- . I, ( . ." I ,. ,T . , It ," I r :'"")'...,' '-4 1t.,  . \,: 4' ,4'. A . .:.'  ',  " . ., I J JI · i " \ I . -.. ,.  . ;'. ". ). . t I.. .... '" ..: ... 1 " "t' . . - . ,.,.. t., ',' .. .?- - . ..'I " , If. .. "('I ',' ,,' .,', ,   . \ ' , ,  . 'I, \',  "j:_ 11 ,  I ,j \- .'1' . 'f, ,Y Grabar. February Azure "r  - .. 'I -- .... J ., 'V' - \ t , t .  " '\ b  , . .. , - '\  . \ i. Sa vrasov. Rooks have -flown Part II. Seasons in Russia Winter Look through the window, It is snowing. It always snows in winter. Winds are blowing. They blow every winter. The sun is not shining, Sometimes it shines all day long. Leafless trees and ever-green pines and fir-trees with heavy ucaps" of snow decorate the landscape. And you? Do you like skating, skiing, making Snowmen, or some other winter sports after a difficult school day? Imagine yourself warmly clothed sitting in a sledge and a fast horse is carrying you along a forest road. The gold sun is shining brightly. You are looking at the sky, at white and silver trees. Are you not very happy? Think of those who composed the music, who painted lan- dscapes, Dream about yourself, your place in the life of our country, She needs each of you, your talent, your knowledge and your help. 41. HanMwMTe CO'fMHeHMe "3MMa". 8aM nOMO)t(eT 3TO CAenaTb LlapYIOl1.\aR MY3blKa r. CBMpMAoBa "Me- Tenb" . Spring It is one of the beloved seasons for many people. The air is fresh, the trees are light green, the days are long. Every- body likes to leave the house and breathe different smells of the first flowers, trees and the ground. The snow is melting. Its white colour is losing its brightness and we enjoy_ oursel- ves with quickly running streams around us. Birds are making their nests; animals are clearing and building their sheltes; insects are waking up and looking for food in the green gardens. It is time for the fruit trees to show themselves in their blos- soming beauty. The loather is fine. It may rain and even snov. People work in their gardens. Planting and sowing keep them long in the gardens. \ Spring is a promising time for the old and the young. WORDLIST blossoming ['blsgmilJ] - u.BeTYVI blow [blgu] (blew, blown) -AYTb boundless ['baundlis] - 6e3rpaHVll.IHbl breathe [bri:o] - BAOXHYTb brightness ['braitnis] - pKOCTb carry ['kreri] - HeCTIt1 decorate ['dekgreit] -YKpawaTb fast (fa:st] - 6blCTpbl fir-tree [fg:tri:] - enb ground ['graund] - 3eMn knowledge ['nlicts] - 3HaHVI, 3HaHVle landscape ['lrenskeip] - nei13a>K leafless ['li:flis] - 6ea /l}'1cTbeB 40 Unit 1 lose [lu:z] (lost, lost) -TepTb melt [melt] - TaTb nest [nest] - rHe3AO pine ['pain] - COCHa plant [pIa: nt] - Ca>KaTb promising ['prmisiI)] - MHoro06ew.alOVI shelter [,feltg] - YKpblTe sledge [sle<t] - caHVI smell [smel] - 3anax sow [Sgu] - ceTb stream [stri:m] - PYl.Ie, nOTOK wake ['weik] - npocblnaTbc warmly clothed ['wJ:mli klguod] -Tenno oAeTbl 
42. Read Russian poetry and enjoy it. ***  1 a nepBbl£1 naHAblW! lt13-noA CHera Tbl npOClI1Wb conHe4HbiX 11ye£1; KaKaSl AeBCTBeHHafi Hera B AYWLt1CTO 4111CTOTe TBoe£1! A. C/JeT 43. Write an essay about spring and if you want, paint a picture. Summer It's great fun. We enjoy every minute of the weather. We swim and get sunburnt, go to the forest and pick berries. We play sports, go hiking. _ Imagin, it is a rainy day and you are in a forest. You can find yourself under a branchy tree in the company of .your dog and the in- sects. All are saving you from the water. We are all together, we feel the rain whispering to each of us something wonderful and com- forting. We must be together. It's God's will. .' .. I .\ I Shishkin. Rye I 44. Read Russian poetry and enjoy it. *** I / f KonOKOnb4111KlI1 MOll1, UBeTlI1KlI1 CTenHble, LITO rnSlAlI1Te Ha MeHSl, TeMHo-rony6ble? V1 0 4eM 3BeHlI1Te Bbl, B AeHb Becenbl£1 MaSl, CpeAb HeKOweHO TpaBbl, r 0110B0£1 Ka4aSl? A. TonCTOM 45. CnywaSi MY3blKY n. . 'iaMKoBcKoro "BpeMeHa rOAa", HanM- WMTe He60nbwoe CO'lMHeHMe "neTO" Ha aHrnMMCKoM Sl3b1Ke. t 46. Try to translate into English these lines from N. Rubtsov's poetry: npHBeT, POCCHSI... *** ...3a Bce XOpOMbl Sl He oTAalO CBo£1 H1I13KlI1£1 AOM C Kpanll1BO£1 nOA oKoHu.eM... KaK MlI1pOTBOpHO 8 ropHlI1u,y MOIO no Be4epaM 3aKaTbisanoCb COJ1Hu.e!.. H.Py6UOB WORDLIST branchy ['bra:niji] - pa3BeCLt1CTbli1 comfort ['kAmfgt] -ycnoKaViBaTb get sunburnt [get 'sAnbg:nt] - .3aropeTb pick up [pik Ap] - c06V1paTb (51roAbl) play sports - 3aHit1MaTbC51 cnopTOM whisper ['wispg] - wenTaTb will [wil] - B0J151 Unit 1 
,. I.. _____- Autumn It is the time for joy and quitness. We can still admire colourful trees: green, yellow, red. In September it is still warm, the sun shines, it doesn't often rain and people don't want to think of the coming winter. Autumn is the time to harvest a rich crop of fruit, vege- tables and berries. We see birds flying away. They are no longer singing. They are "pac- king" . September, 1 is called the Day of Know- ledge in Russia. It is a great holiday for teac- hers, schoolchildren and their parents. Pupils come back to school full of new impressions about their summer holidays. How wonderful that we have all these seasons. .. .  V'  ...... .- , . . . ......t. .. ..;-. t. I , . .... ... " ...   I  .. .. Levitan. Golden Autumn 47. Listen and read. Part III. Our greats Russian nature, spirit and genius come together in the greatest people of our land. Let's pay tribute to a few of them. -M. Lomonosov was one of them. He was a great thinker, leader of Russian science, a well-known enlighte- ner; an inventor of many technologies, a poet, a translator, a historian. The first Russian University in Moscow was founded according to the pro- ject of M. Lomonosov. In 1940 the University was named in honour of him. "Lomonosov was the first university for us." (A. Pushkin) V. Vernadsky developed the greatest theory of the XX century - biosphe- re, the environment which created us and which we represent. K. Timiryazev was an outstanding botanist. He wrote about evolution in nature. He devoted all his life to photosynthesis of plants. D. Mendeleev was the creator of his famous "Table of chemical elements". A. Popov was the creator of radio. In 1895 he gave a working demonstra- tion of the first radio receiver in the world and several months later he tran- smitted the radio message over a distance of 250 metres. They all founded their inventions on the great ideas of M. Lomonosov. The Cosmos has become a sphere for experiments of the XX century: bi- ological, ecolog ical, ag ricultural, industrial and others. Everybody remembers outstanding scientists of our country: K. Tsialkov- sky, S. Korolev and other cosmos scientists who studied the Cosmos and gave the world the first flight round our dear and beautiful earth. We all know the courageous hero - Yury Gagarin. Glory to all of them dead and living! WORDLIST biosphere ['baisfi] - 6lt1occpepa courageous [k'reict5s] - cMeIlbli1 creator [kri:'eit] - C03AaTeIlb develop [di'velp] -C03AaTb devote [di 'vut] - nOCBstTlt1Tb enlightener [in'laitn] - npocBeTVlTeIlb few [fju:] - HeKOTopble found ['faund] - OCHOBblBaTb glorious ['gl:rids] - 3HaMeHVlTbli1 in his honour ['n] - B ero eCTb message ['mesict5] - nOCIlaHVle metrology [me'trldct3i] - MeTpOIlOrVist pay a tribute of respect ['tribju:t] - OTAaTb AaHb YBIDKe- HViSI photosynthesis [.futdu'sinedSis] - OTOClt1HTe3 radio receiver ['reidiu ri'si:vd] - paAlt10nplt1eMH1K represent [.repri'zent] - npeACTaBJ1stTb spirit ['spirit] - AYX transmit [trrenz'mit] - nepeAaBaTb 42 Unit 1 
, ' .. ..!... --- .-':':'.. . ..... " - J ,"'j St. Basil's Cathed ral 48. By whom and when were they built? Match the figures and the letters. When 1555-1562 1927-1929 Builder /architect Konstantin Melnikov Barma and Postnik The building 1) St. Basil's Cathedral 2} The house at 15 Krivoarbatsky pereulok 3) Radio Mast 1922 Vladimir Shukhov 49. Read and find out. Give a back translation, please. 1) St. Basil's Cathedral is the pride of the Russian people; it has graced Red Square for more than four centuries. It was designed by the great archi- tects Barma and Postnik. 2) Vladimir Shukhov was born on the 16th of August, 1863, not far from Kursk. In 1876 he graduated from one of the most outstanding technical scho- ols in Russia. He was sent on business to the World's fair celebrating the 100th anniversary of the United States of America. There he became acquainted with the engineer Bari. In 1878 Bari organised in Russia an engineering firm. Since 1880 Shukhov was the main engineer of the firm. .. , In November of 1989 at John Hopkins University in Washington D.C. at the conference "Reconstruction of Russia" (1880-1940) Shukhov was called "the Edison of Russia: a great engineer." 3) Konstantin Stepanovich Melnikov. an outstanding Russian architect. was born in Moscow in 1890. He was one of the authors of the project of Moscow reconstruction. In 1920-1930 he designed new types of public building: clubs, palaces. He designed the monument to Christopher Columbus in Santo-Domingo. Melni- kov's house, the house he owned, can still be seen in Krivoarbatsky pereulok in Moscow. All his buildings are famous for unusual architectural decisions. It was a great and gifted master. i.. · J. " .. t tV' , ..,....- . , .. , i' . 1 I " , .. " .. - .,. -- - I .. .... ...... # ....:;:a ,- 'I - I i' I t t. I :d  .." '1  . .:.:---- , 1\'...' t t, 6__ ..., , - "\I C !'.' ., '1 . "",,' I ':f .,"' i'l. : .1 , . \\ _ \' ) .,  "  - J- 'r.1: . : : .11 . .. .. ". .. I I I I, .' , I' . . I . \... . J. .H ,- . ".'  . -.'- .. ... -" "'"':.. . '- ,- .' II -fit \ -' . r' ;f ';'.. '_ _ .",.- ,.; -". Melnikov's house in Krivoarbatsky pereulok Unit 1 43 
Part IV. What kind of person are you? 50. Fill in the blanks: My name is My birthday is My wish My favourite book is What I do well ..... I.... .. I...................................... I......... A pe rso n I ad mire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My favourite animal is .............................................................. My favo u rite food is.............................................................. We hope that you are kind, helpful, generous to your family and friends, hard-working, honest, reliable and always keep your word. USTF . N 51 . Read and act out. Representatives of the United Kingdom "Our household represents the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Nor- thern Ireland." "How is that?" "I'm English, my wife's Scottish, the nurse is Irish; so I represent England, my wife Scotland, the nurse Northern Ireland, and the baby wails." WORDLIST representative Lrepri'zentgtiv] - npeACTaBtltTeJ1b Wales [weilz] - yaCTb BeJlLt1K06ptltTaHLt1V1 wail [weil] - BOnLt1Tb, KpVlyaTb 44 Unit 1 
Aesop Aesop was a Greek folk hero. He lived in the 6th century B.C. He was a teller of animal fables and stories in which animals behaved like human beings. Although Aesop himself probably did not write down his fables him- self, other people recorded collections of his stories as early as the 4th century B.C. Short, easy to understand, and entertaining, teachers have been using Aesop's fables since ancient times as texts in schools. The Ants and the Grasshopper All summer long, the ants were busy. They were working and plan- ning for the snowy months. They raced back and forth. They were gat- hering food for the long, cold winter days. The large ants carried sticks. They gathered grass and grain and stored it in their caves. One sunny day a grasshopper was watching the busy little ants. They were racing back and forth. "Why not come and chat with me," said the Grasshopper, "instead of working in that way?" "Why are they so indus- trious on such a beautiful, warm, and sunny day? I guess they just don't know how to have a good time." The industrious little ants continued to work. They didn't stop a mo- ment to talk to the grasshopper. One of the ants looked up at the gras- shopper and said to himself, "Why is he staring and laughing at us? I bet he'll pay the price of hunger when winter comes. " Wintertime came. Snow covered the green fields, and the grain disappeared. One winter day some of the ants .crawled out of their ant-hills onto the snow to look around. There was the long-legged gras- shopper, who looked very pale and thin. He told the ants that he was dying of hun- ger and that he needed something to eat. He said that he had no food and that he could not find any food in the ice and snow.  -- J\ ---.y   .Q. ,. \\ L r : _- 'I- ( ( t -! -..ii.' ./. R 1:.._-= --> £- ... . .,. I I I... t r ;'" --:--..   :,t.;;}> - \\ ,: . .:-:.....   ;, .. -4' //j.. : :\\'.;.::a  //.. ," ......... - : ,.' ,;,.e:' . ..... ..' .' :1/1::  ·  'U>  -.+ ,',. ;. ::' .,: ,;;. . r.tr'.. t) .) · .. ,;-;,'" Ii. : P' O' ii' ...;!' ::.. : _'_" , WORDLIST Aesop ['i:sop] - 330n although [:l'ou] - XOTS1 ancient ['einJnt] - ApeBHLt1t1 ant [rent] - MypaBei1 ant-hill ['renthil] - MypaBeHK B.C. = Before Christ [bi'f: kraist] - AO Hawei1 apbl behaved like human beings [bi'heiv laik 'hju:mn] - BeJ1 ce6S1, KaK J1IOAVI cave [keiv] - HopKa century ['sentfuri] - BeK chat [tfret] - 60J1TaTb crawl out [kr:l aut] - BbIn0/13TVI entertaining Lent'teinilJ] - 3aHMMaTeJ1bHbli1 fable [feibl] - 6acHS1 folk ['fuk] - HapoAHbl forth [f3:8] - BnepeA gather [Igreo] - c06paTb grain [grein] -aepHo grasshopper ['grQ:s,hp] - KY3HeVlK Greek [gri:k] - rpeecKi1 industrious [in'dAstris] -TPYA0J1106V1Bbli1 instead of working in that way [in'sted 'w:kilJ oret lwei] - BMeCTO Toro. T06bl raK pa60TaTb long-legged [lllJlegd] - AJlVlHHOHOrVl race [reis] - MyaTbCS1 raced back and forth [Ireisid brek rend f:e] - CHOBaJlVl T'fAa  06paTHo record [ri'k:d] - 3anLt1CblBaTb stare [st£] - CMOTpeTb npVlCTaJ1bHO stick [stik] - na/1Ka store [st3:] - 3anacaTb. OTKJl(lAbIBaTb Unit l' 45 
 a "You acted so smart in the summertime, Mr. Grasshopper. You told us that we were crazy working so hard. Now you are the one who is hungry, and we are the ones who are laughing. Who is crazy now?" one of the ants asked with a grin on his face. The little ants looked up at the big, starving grasshopper and waited for a reply. Then the long-legged grasshopper said, "I was too busy. I was ma- king music and enjoying the summertime sun." All of the ants looked at the grasshopper and laughed at him. The smallest ant moved forward and said, "Just a moment, Mr. Gras- shopper. Even though we don't feel sorry for you, we don't want you to go hungry. You may have some of our grass and grain this time. But we hope that you have learned that hunger is the price you pay for not plan- ning ahead. There's a time for work and a time for play." Moral: It is best to prepare for the days of necessity. 52. Answer the questions. 1) What was the Grasshopper doing on a hot summer day? 2) What were the ants doing on a hot summer day? 3) What happened to the ants when winter came? 4) What happened in winter to the Grasshopper? 5) Which character would you like to be and why? 6) Did you like this fable? Why or \vhy not? 7) What valuable lesson can be learned from this fable? 53. In a few sentences retell the plot and moral. 54. Fill in the table with the verbs from the text and translate them. Could you please retell the text using the table? Past Present Future Simple raced are Progressive were working Perfect Perfect Progressive \ WORDLIST crazy ['kreizi] - 6e3YMHbli:1 enjoy [in'cBi] - HaCJ1a)I(AaTbCS1 grin [grin] - YXMblllKa III Unit 1 reply [ri'plai] - orBeT smart [sma:t] - YMHbl£1 starve [sta:v] - YMit1paTb C r0J10AY 
IPit 55. Dramatize, using a narrator and actors. The Ant and the Grasshopper Narrator One summer day a grasshopper was jumping and singing. An ant was passing by. He was carrying some corn to the nest. Grasshopper Hello. How are you? Ant Fine, thank you! And how are you? Grasshopper I'm fine. \/'tJhy not come and chat with me instead of working in that way? Ant I'm storing up food for the winter. I advise you to do the same. We have been storing food for several weeks al ready. Grasshopper Why bother about winter? We have plenty of food at present. Narrator When the winter came the grasshopper had no food. He found himself dying of hunger. The ant was not hungry. Every day he ate corn and grain. Ant Hello, Mr. Grasshopper. You look very pale and thin. Grasshopper I'm dying of hunger. I need something to eat. I have no food. I can't find any food in the ice and snow. Ant You acted so smart in the summer time, Mr. Grasshop- per. You told us that we were crazy working so hard. Now you are the one who is hungry, and we are the ones who are laughing. Who is crazy now? Grasshopper I was making music in summer. I was enjoying the summer time sun. The smallest Ant Just a moment, Mr. Grasshopper. Even though we don't feel sorry for you, we don't want you to go hungry. You may have some grass and grain this time. We hope that you have learned that hunger is the price you pay for not planning ahead. There is a time for work and a time for play. Moral: It is best to prepare for the days of necessity. 56. Write about: How can you tell an insect from other creatures? How many legs does an insect have? What are the parts of an insect body? Why aren't spiders insects? What are some relatives of the grasshoppers? Are the grasshoppers the most musical of insects? 57. As the grasshopper write a letter to the ant and ask him for help. Tell him how wrong you were not to work in summer. 1Jear knt, Unit 1 47 
, '1 -- _., f ..-', ,.., . '\ ! '(. ;::.-., e6 , . 1 ! . . , . spend all morr:-re watching televisior , n. he ssh pper / . NEEDED: two or more players dice markers ( t , J . GAME RULES: 1) Roll dice to see who goes first (highest roller begins play). 2) Roll dice and move your marker as many spaces as you rolled. 3) Decide whether or not the activity on the space is wise to do. If you answer correc- tly. roll the dice again and move forward the number of spaces that you rolled. If you answer incorrectly. roll the dice and go backward that many spaces. or else return to START if you cannot go that far back. 4) The first player to reach the FINISH is the winner. He is like the ant, and his wisdom will help him live a good life. To the loser: Be careful and learn. lest you become like the grasshopper and suffer as a result of your poor decisions. . -....,...- 9- ,1' . - \ ,< v '" , ) ! # '." . 15 14 13 "c r ,\\.. - :.\ . {I. ..\, . :( t1 kick your dog or pull clean your bedroom spend all of YC.E its tail money as soon Jr .--- \\ : r i you get it, not s, Congra I . IS . -- vlng any . ......., 48 Unit 1 
2 3 4 19 read a book I eat only "junk-food" do your homework ' _ .: . -I"'.'" \  - 1111 is best to prepeare for the days of necessity" Aesop .. 5 read the newspaper 6 take advantage of smaller children 7 play sports to get exercise 8 paint a picture I , 12 11 10 9 If see a play, opera, or play a musical In- get in a fight read the newspaper s concert strument - ( "' \ '. >....... . . I \ . ... ..  ",. ') ., I 4T( \1\.. , fl KEY as!MUn ( as!M (v as!MUn (8  as!M (G  as!M ( as!MUn (0  as!M (6 as!M (8 as!M (L as!MUn (9 as!M ( as!M (v as!MUn (8 as!M (G as!MUn ( I!mIII m 
1m) ImnII 58. As the Ant answer the grasshopper's letter and explain why you cannot help him. 'Dear Mr. G-rassh0t'rer, 59. Design the house for the grasshopper. 60. Design the house for the ant. 61. Draw a map to the ant's house and write how you can get there. 62. Select any character and try to put yourself in his place. How would you react to the situation? Write your ideas using the first person. 63. Write your own fable. Present it to the school library for ot- hers to enjoy. 64. Update the fable. Instead of the grasshopper who sang all summer, it could be about the boy who wasted away time until it came for the test. What were the consequences? 65. Work together in groups to publish a newspaper called "The Animal Gazette." Report the plot of the fable as a new event. Be sure to include who, when, where and what happened. Write the headline as it would appear in a newspaper. Re- member that there should be an editorial in the newspaper. 66. Make a review on insects. Read this information. You can use it in the newspaper. The Adult Insect How can you tell an insect from other creatures? Is a spider an insect? How about a scorpion? Are crabs and lobsters really big insects that live in the water? To find the answer, let's look at a good example of an insect - the butter- fly. Think of the ways in which the butterfly is different from a spider. First, there are big wings. Of all the crawling creatures, only insects have wings. Although spiders may sometimes sail through the air at the end of a long, thin, silk thread, like a parachute, no spider can really fly. How many legs does an insect have? Count the number of legs on a butterfly. You'll find that there are six legs. A spider has eight. Crabs and lobsters have ten. Other creatures may have even more. But an insect has just six legs as an adult. 
What are the parts of an insect's body? Another way to identify an insect is to count the number of main body parts. - Looking at the butterfly, you can see that it has three main body sections: 1} a head 2} a chest with legs 3} a tail. Why aren't spiders insects? The spider seems to have only two parts. Crabs seem to have only one. Scorpions have many. And they all have many legs and no wings. So they are not insects. How many kinds of insects are there? Nobody knows exactly how many kinds of insects there are, but we are sure that there must be more than a million different kinds. Some scientists think there may be seven or eight million kinds - perhaps even more. But we do know that there are more kinds of insects crawling and swimming and fly- ing around than all the other kinds of animals put together. How much does an insect eat? Who eats more food - you or your parents? Many growing insects eat much more than their mother and father eat together. They may eat more than their own weight in food each day. They are growing so fast that they never seem to get enough food. Do you know that Grasshoppers are the most musical of insects? They make most of the insect sounds we hear. Do you know that cockroaches are the relatives of grasshoppers, and eat nearly everything? They eat even glue from the back of postage stamps. WORDLIST adult ['redAI t] - B3POCl1bl cockroach ['k:>krutf] - TapaKaH count [kaunt] - C"lTaTb crawling creature ['kr:>:lil) 'kri:tf] - n0J13atOe CYLl.\eCTBa identify [ai'dentifai] - 3A. on03HaTb lobster ['1:>bst] - OMap main body parts [mein 'bx1i pa:ts] - r.naBHble "IaCTI1 Tern postage stamp ['PusticB stremp] - nOYTOBa5J Map- Ka sail [seil] - 3A. 3aBcaTb, nJ1b1Tb section ['sekJ( ) n] - 3A. yaCTb silk thread [8red] - wellKOBa5J HVlTb spider ['spaid] - naYK wing [wil)] - KpblJ10 Unit 1 HI 
AoporLt1e APY3b! EcnVl Bbl 6YAeTe CneAOBaTb npaBVInaM 6e30naCHOCTVI B AOMe VI Ha ynVlLJ.e VI npVl- 06peTere XOpOwLt1e npVlBbl'1KVI, Bbl coxpa- HViTe CBoe 3AopOBbe VI nOKO B Bawe ceMbe VI 6YAere npVlrHbl OKpY)l(alOw.VlM. 3anOMHVlTe Ha BCIO )l(Vl3Hb npaBVIna 6e30naCHocrVl 8 AOMe Lt1 Ha ynVlLJ.e. AeJlaTe C4aCTJlVlBblMVI rex, C KeM Bbl o6w.aereCb. )l<enaeM ycnexa! 
LI E ESS 1. Listen, read and make wall charts. 1) Safety at Home Do not play with fire. Do not play with bottles of medicine. Do not touch electrical wires or electrical sockets. Do not play near a hot iron. You might burn yourself. Do not go too near to a pot that is boiling on the cooker. Do not run on a wet floor. You might slip and hurt yourself. Do not let strangers into the house. 2) Safety in the street Do not talk to strangers. Do not accept gifts or sweets from a stranger. Do not play by the road side. Do not push anyone when you are playing in the playground. Swim only when there are adults around to watch over you. It is dangerous to seek shelter beneath a tree during a thunderstorm. Cross the road only when the traffic light shows a green light. 3) Good habits Brush you teeth before you sleep; brush them again when you wake up in the morning. Remember to bathe every day. It will keep you clean and fresh. Trim your nails often. Wash your hands before you eat. Wash your hands, after going to the toilet. It stops germs spreading. Leave the wash basin clean for the next person. So, be clean and tidy. It makes you feel good and look good. Remember: cough and sneezes spread diseases. Catch germs in your handkerchiefs. Some American families have their own "Family Goals" and "Family Rules": Do not sit too close while watching T.V. Help Mummy and Daddy with the housework. Save water and electricity. Remember to put your things away after using them. Do not throw your litter on the ground, place it in the rubbish bins. Be willing to help people in need. WORDLIST accept [gk'sept] - npHMaTb adult ['redAlt] - B3pocnbl bathe [beio] - KynaTbcS1 be willing ['wil i I)] - 3A. npOBnTb rOTOBHOCTb beneath [bi'ni:e] - nOA, BH3Y burn [bd:n] - 06>KVlraTb chart [tfa:t] - Ta6nVlua close [klgus] - 6nVl3Ko cooker ['kukg] - nnVlTa, neb dangerous ['deincBgrgs] - onacHbl gift ['gift] - nOAapoK hurt [hg:t] - YW6Tb, YAapTb iron ['aign] - YTlOr litter ['1 i t g J - MYCOP nail [neil] - HorOTb playground ['plei,graund] - nnOl.l.J.aAKa An rp push [puf] - TOJ1KaTb rubbish bin ['rAbif] - Kop3V1Ha AJl Mycopa safety ['seifti] - 6e30nacHocTb seek [si:k] - VlCKaTb shelter ('feltd] - 3A. YKpblTVle slip [slip] - nocKonb3HYTbC socket ['skit] - 3JleKTpOp03eTKa stranger ('streincBg] - He3HaKOMeu thunderstorm ['eAndgst:J:m] - rp03a trim [trim] - nOApaBHVlBaTb, nOApe3aTb wire [wai] - npOBOA I!1mD HI 
4) Pride and self-respect We do lots of things in private which are very rude in public: picking our nose, picking our teeth, cleaning our ears. Really polite people don't behave rudely, even when they are alone. Personal hygiene and pride in our appearance show that we respect our- selves and others, too. B AMepMKe npMHS1TO npMKpennHTb Ha MaWMHbl M XOnOAMnbHMKM pa3nM'fHble 3anMC'1 M OTKpbITKM. BOT 'I TO YBMAen Cawa Ha xono- AMnbHMKe Y r3p3TOB: . I · 1 · We want to be a loving family. · 2. We want to be alert at school and work. · 3. We want to be morally clean. · 4. We want to develop our individual talents. · 5. We want to be kind. WORDLIST appearance ['pir{)ns] - BHeWHVI£1 BA attend ['tend] - noceaTb be alert ['l:t] - 6blTb 6ATeIlbHbIM, OCTOPO>K- HblM be involved [in'vlvd] - npHVlMaTb yacTVle catch ['kretf] (caught, caught) - IlOBVlTb cough [kf] - KaWIlS1Tb date [dei t] - XOAVlTb Ha CBVlAaHS1 develop [di'velp] - pa3BBaTb disease [di'zi:z] - 60J1e3Hb event [i'vent] - c06blTVle, MeponpVlS1Te germ [cE:m] - MVlKp06, 6aKTepVlS1 handkerchief ['hrel)ktJif] - HOCOBOi1 nJ1aTOK healthy ['heI8i] - 3AOPOBbl£1 hygiene ['haict3i:n] - rVlrlt1eHa immorality Lim'rreliti] - 6e3HpaBcTBeHHocTb 54 Unit 2 . We wit! at! try to attend any e.vent in which one. of our famiLy me.m"ers is involved to show our support. . Wt. wilL always i?t. homt. "r ten 0 clock. . We wIt! not date. untiL we. are. sixtun. . We wit! not do anythin.9 that wilL ltad to immorality. . That. wiLL i?t. no 'tuarrdin.9 in our hOU5 in private ['praivit] - HaeAVlHe in public ['pAblik] - OTKPbITO. ny6IlVlHo kind [kaind] - A06pbl£1 lead [li:d] (led, led) - BeCTVI. npVlBoATb pick [pik] - KOBbtpS1Tb. VlCTTb (HOC, 3y6bl) pride [praid] - rOPAOCTb quarreling ['kwrliJ)] - ccopa rude [ru:d] - rpy6bl, HeBocnVlTaHHbli1 self-respect (.selfris'pekt] - caMoYBa>KeHVle sneeze [sni:z] - VlxaTb spreading [spredil)] - pacnpocTpaHeHe support [s'p:t] - nO)J.Aep>KKa wash basin ['w::>J ,beisn] - paKOBVlHa, YMblBaIlbHL-1K wealthy ['weI8i] - 60raTbl£1 wise [waiz] - 6Ilaropa3YMHbl£1. MYAPbl 
YOUR F MIL Y TREE . Genealogy is the study of families. Through genealogy, you can discover a lot about your roots. You can learn who your ancestors are, when and where they were born, who they married, how many children they had) and when they died. One of the best ways to show how you are related to other people in your family is by drawing a diagram called a family tree. It is called a family tree because the farther back in time you trace your ancestors, the more "bran- ches" your family tree will contain. A family tree can be simple or complex. A complex family tree shows the dates and places where family members were born, married, and died. The following figure is one of the simplest family trees. It shows only dates of birth and death for a few people. reat-grandmother' .. maiden name: Emma Vardman Born in: 1908 reat-grandfather'  name: Frazier Elliott Born in: 1902 Grandfather's name: Chester Elliott Born in: 1926 rea -grandmother' maiden name: Sell Thomas Born in: 1904 Great-grandfather's name: Allen Justice Born in: 1902 Grandmother's maiden name: Barbara Justice Born in: 1928 Mother's maiden name: Joan Elliott Born in: 1946 Great-grandmother's maiden name: Martha Shaffer Born in: 1890 Great-grandfather' name: Louis Bowman Born in: 1889 Grandmother's maiden name: Marian Bowman Born in: 1916 Fat er's name: Kirk Garrett Born in: 1946 Alison Garrett Country where I was born: America. Great-grandmother' . maiden name: Francis Kirk Patrick Born in: 1878 Great-grandfather' .. name: Anthony Garrett Born in: 1878 Grandfather's name: C. Kirk Garrett Born in: 1911 2. After looking at the family tree, see if you can answer these questions: 1) What was the name of Alison's grandmother before she married? 2) How old was Alison's great-grandmother when Alison was born? 3) Joan Elliott is Alison's ... 4) Marian Bowman is Alison's ... 5) Anthony Garret is Alison's... 6) Martha Shaffer is ... years older than Francis Kirk Patrick. ...... .......... .. . Unit 2 iii 
3. You may want to draw your own family tree. Ask your parents for information about your ancestors. Use a form like the one below to collect information on each of your relatives. Name of person: Born when and where: Parent's names: Married who, when, and where: Children, born when and where: Died when and where: 4. If you parents don't know the information, ask your grandpa- rents, aunts, or uncles. Get as much information as possible about each of your relatives. Then draw your family tree, using the information you have gathered. If you make a neat drawing, it will make a nice present for your family. 5. Listen and read the text about some members of the Royal Family. The Queen and her family The Queen was born in 1926. She married Prince Philip, Duke of Edin- burgh, in 1947. Her coronation was on 2nd June 1953. Her title is Queen Eliza- beth II. Prince Philip was born in 1921. The Queen and Prince Philip have four children. They are Prince Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward. Prince Charles was born in 1948. He will become the next king as he is the Queen's eldest son. He married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. She was born in 1961. Prince Charles became the Prince of Wales in 1969. They now have two children, William and Henry. William was born in 1982. Henry was born in 1984. Princess Anne was born in 1950. She married Captain Mark Philips in 1973. Mark Philips was born in 1948. They have two children, Peter (1977) and Zara (1981 ). Prince Andrew was born in 1960 and Prince Edward in 1964... 6. Please complete the Royal Family tree. vfI:Ij:..-:;: "...... . '-:'\- .."' ::-- ---.\ :../. . ..:-.....-=.... -::.. . ----,-.-- -':,._-.:"-'--:-:::.- - -:,tfI' ,.'. - _-_, __-... -....... .- ....-. .. .- . - . ." .- .. . .. - - RO i 1- I  FI Elizabeth II = Philip, Duke of Edinburgh b. 1926 I WORDLIST ancestor ['rensist] - npeAOK branch [bra:nUJ - BeTBb be related [ri'leitid] - MeTb OTHOWeHit1e. COCTOTb B pOACTBeHHblX OTHOWeHLt1s:1X birth [ba:e] - pO>KAeHVle complex ['k3mpleks] -CJ10>KHbli1 contain [kan'tein] - cOAep>KaTb draw a diagram ['daiagrrem] - pit1COBaTb Ait1arpaM- MY 56 Unit 2 death [de] - CMepTb die [da i] - YMVlpaTb discover [dis'kA va] - 06Hap}I)KVlTb genealogy LcBi:ni'relcBi] - reHeaJ10n"s:I, POAOCJlOB- Ha roots [ru:ts] - KOpHLt1 the farther ['fa: oa] - yeM .o.aJ1bWe trace [tre is] - YCTaHOB1-1Tb. npOCJ1e>KVlBaTb 
g... .. - . WORDLIST ES Most Americans have three names: a first name, a middle name, and a last name. The first name and the middle names are given names (the names on the birth certificate). Some people do not have a middle name. The last name, or surname, is the family name and comes from the father's or husband's last name. Listed below are the names of famous people: Roosevelt, Theodore (1858-1919). 26th U.S. President (1901-1909). Roosevelt, Franklin Delano (1882-1945). 32th U.S. President (1933-1945). Kennedy, John Fitzgerald (1917-1963). 35th U.S. President (1961-1963). Keller, Helen Adams (1880-1968). American author and lecturer. Morse, Finley Breese (1791-1872). American painter and inventor (tele- graphy code and instruments). Dickinson, Emily Elizabeth (1830-1886). American poet. Sir Charles Spenser Chaplin (1889-1977). British-born actor, director, and producer. Questions for conversation: 1) Please write your whole name in your native language. 2) In your country, how many names do people usually have? Which is your given name? Which is your family name? What are the customs for giving names in your country? 3) In the United States sometimes boys are named after their fathers and grandfathers. If a son is named after his father, he writes Jr. (junior) after his name. If a grandson is then named after both his father and grandfat- her, he writes III (the third) after his name. Is that a custom in your native country? 7. Your name is very special because it tells who you are. Find out more about your name by answering these questions. (You may have to ask your parents for some of the information.) 1 } What is your name? 2) What does your name mean? 3} Are you named after a relative or a special person? Who is that person? 4} Do you know any other people with your name? Who are they? 5} Do you like your name? 6} Do you think your name describes you? 7} Would you prefer another name? Which name? Why? 8) Do you have a nickname? What is it? 9} How did you get your nickname? be named after - 6blTb Ha3BaHHbiM B yeCTb KorO-TO birth certificate [bg:8 sg'tifikit]- CBLt1AeTellbCTBO o pO>KAeHVlLt1 (MeTpVlKa) both [bgu8] - 06a, 06e custom ['kAstgm] - 06blyai1 describe [dis1kraib] - 3A. xapaKTep30BaTb, onVl- CblsaTb grandson ['grrendsAn] - BHYK husband ['hAZbgnd] - MY>K Jr. (junior) ['cBu:n i] - MllaAwVli1 last name = surname = family name - <paMVlJ1V1 mean [mi:n] (meant, meant) - 3HaYVlTb, 03HayaTb middle name [midI neim] - BTopoe VlM native language ['neitiv 'lrelJgwi<\)] - pOAHO 5t3b1K nickname ['nikneim] - np03BVIe prefer [pri'fg:] - npe,nnOYVlTaTb relative ['relgtiv] - pOACTBeHHVlK special ['spef{ g )1] - oc06eHHbl whole name - nOJ1HOe VlM Unit 2 57 
.111 Unit 2 Pen Pals across the world 8. Fill in the blanks. Write about yourself. Send this sheet or a letter to a pen pal. 1. Hi! My name is 2. I am in the grade and I am 3. My favourite subject in school is 4. I have brothers and 5. Do you have any pets? I have 6. One time my family went to 7. 8. My hobbies are 9. Would you like to be my pen pal? My address is: years old. sisters. . I like the is my favourite TV show. 1 O. When you write to me, I would like to know these things about you: _  Writing letters in English KorAa Tbl co6paeWbCft HancaTb nCbMO, AononHTenbHble CBeAeHft 0 TOM, KaK npaBflbHO ero O<POPMTb, 6YAYT AJlft Te6ft none3Hbi  HTepeCHbl. no rlCbMY MO)f(HO CYATb 0 KYflb TYpe YenOBeKa. 1) nonb3YMTecb 'IMCTOM, Hepa3nMHoBaHHoM 6YMaroM. This is no good. This is no good too! 2) Ka>KAoe nMCbMO AOn>KHO MMeTb o6paTHbiM 8Apec. Flat 25 HOMep Bawe KBapTpbl 5, Lomonosov St. HOMep sawero AOMa  Ha3BaHe Bawe YflLt1LJ.bl Moscow ropOA Russia CTpaHa He 3a6YAbTe nponycTMTb CTpOliKY nepeA AaToM. 3/5/92 AaTa 06paTMTe BHMMaHMe, KaK B nMCbMe cOKPaU¥lIOTcR CneAYIOUJ.Me cnOBa: Street St. Terrace Terr. Road Rd. Plan PI. Square Sq. Gardens Gdns. Avenue Ave. \ 3) Aa-ry MO>KHO HanMcaTb pa3HblMM cnoco6aMM: 15th September, 1995 15th Sept., 1995 15 September, 1995 September 15th, 1995 September 15, 1995 Sept. 15, 1995 4) AHrnM'IaHe nMwyr TaK: 15/9/95 (AeHb, MeCftU, rOA) , a aMepMKaHL\bl nMwYT MecRu. nepBblM, 3aTeM AeHb, a nOTOM rOA: 9/15/95. " 
111 g.W .W - . 9. Read and find out. In the United States dating starts early. In some families thirteen- and four- teen-year-old boys and girls go out on dates. When young teenagers go on dates they often go with a group, and usually the group has a chaperon. But older teenagers usually do not have a chaperon on their dates. When a third person arranges a date between two strangers, it is a blind date. Some people send information about themselves to a computer dating bureau, which matches them with blind dates. In the past it was customary for a boy to pay for a date. Sometimes today a girl pays for herself. This is called going dutch. Frequently a boy asks a girl for a date, but more and more often girls are asking boys for dates. Answer the questions: 1 ) Do young people go on dates in your native country? How young are they when they begin dating? 2) Have you ever had a blind date? What do you think of this custom? """"'- -- 10. Please choose someone you'd like to date. 1) The qualities I would like 2) I feel most comfortable with in a date are: people who are: . I 0 beauty 0 athletic o intelligence 0 intellectual o honesty 0 romantic o humour 0 protective o seriousness 0 artistic o success 0 peaceful o generosity 0 ambitious o kindness 0 successful o energy WORDLIST ambitious [rem'bifs] - 4ecToIlI061Bbl go dutch [gu dAtf]- nJ1aTVlTb Ka>KAbli13a ce651 arrange ['reincB) - YCTpaIt1BaTb. opraHVl30Bbl- go on a date - VlATVI Ha CBVlAaHVle BaTb hon esty [I:) n is t i] - 4eCTHOCTb artistic [a:'tistik] - xYAO>KeCTBeHHbli1. apTVlcTVI- intellectual Lint'lekful] - VlHTeJ1J1eKTyaJ1bHbli1 yeCKVli1 intelligence [in'telicBns] -YM, VlHTeIlIleKT athletic [re8'letik] - cnopTVlBHbl kindness ['kaindnis) - A06poTa beauty ('bju:ti) - KpacoTa match [mretf) - nOA6V1paTb B COOTBeTCTBVIVI blind date [blaind de it) - CBVlAaHVI. C -He3HaKO- pay for - n/laTVlTb, OnJ1a4V1BaTb MblM Ye/lOBeKOM (BCJ1enylO) peaceful ['pi:sfu1] - MVlPHbl bureau ['bjura.u] - 61Opo protective [pr'tektiv] - cnoc06Hbli1 3aLLlVlTVlTb chaperon [,frep.run] - conpOBO>KAaIOLLlVl romantic [ru'mrentik] - pOMaHTVl4ecKVli1. po- customary ['kAstmari] - 06bI4Hbli1. npVlBbl4Hbli1 MaHTVl4Hbli1  date [deit) - BCTpe4a, CBAaHLt1e; TOT, KOMY Ha- seriousness [sirisnis] - cepbe3HocTb 3Ha4alOT CBVlAaHe succes [sk'ses] - ycnex date [deit] - Ha3Ha4aTb CBIt1AaHlt1e successful [sk'sesful] - YAa4J1It1Bbli1, VlMelOw.lt1 energy r'encBi] - 3Heprlt151, CJ1a ycnex feel [fi:1] (felt, felt) - 4YBcTBoBaTb ce651 teenager ['ti:n.ei<t] - nOAPocTOK B B03pacTe OT frequently ['fri:kwantIi]- 4aCTO 13 AO 19 /leT generosity LcBen'r:)sti] - w.eAPOCTb. Be/lVlKO- AYWVle \,.. Unit 2 59 
3) I like people whose favorite activities are: o movies o T.V. o sports o dancing o music Dreading o politics o talking o cooking o pai nti ng 4) I like people who are: 5) I prefer to date someone who is: o shy o strong o reliable o brave o intellectual o talented o opti mistic o witty o honest D sincere o organized o helpful 11 . Look at the words. Describe with your partner which of them you can use to describe people in your class, and yourselves too, if you like. Try to find three words for each person in the class. \ o my age o slightly older o slightly younger o much older o much younger 1 2. Write a letter to your pen-friend, describing your own qualities and the qualities of the people you feel most comfortable ith. SUMMER OBS The summer jOb is a tradition among students of American schools and univer- sities. Long before the end of the school year, students begin their search for jobs during vacation (June, July, August). Students send letters to businesses, and talk to employers about job opportunities during the summer. Reasons for wanting a summer job vary from student to student. Some work to help pay their school expenses; others work to gain experience in their chosen professions; still others work just for the fun of it. Paperboy, typist, construction worker, salesclerk, baby-sitter, factory-worker, waiter or waitress - these are some of the more common jobs that students seek during the summer months. WORDLIST activity [rek'tivi ti] - 3aH5ITVle, Ae5lTellbHOCTb baby-sitter - H5IH5I be interested in smth - VlHTepeCOBaTbC5I yeM-J11t160 brave [breiv] - xpa6pbl, cMellbl common ['kmn] - pacnpocTpaHeHHbli1 construction worker [kn'strAkI( )n 'w:k]- pa60Yt.1 Ha cTpoKe expense [iks'pens] - pacxoA gain experience [gein iks'pirins] - Ha6paTb- C5I onblTa movies (Am. E.) = films (Br. E.) - Kt.1HO much [mAtf] - ropa3Ao opportunity Lp'tju:niti]- B03MO>KHOCTb optimistic Lpti'mistik] - onTVlMVlCTl-1'-1Hbl paperboy ['peipbi] - pa3HOC'-It1K ra3eT politics ['p Ii tiks] -=- nOJ1t.1Tt.1Ka, nOllt.1TLt1yeCKa51 Ae5lTellbHOCTb m E1mD prefer [pri'f:] - npeAnO'-lViTaTb reason ['ri:zn] - npVl'-lVlHa reliable [ri'laibl] - HaAe>KHbli1 . salesclerk ['seilzkla:k] - npoAaBeu. search [s:tf] - nOViCK seek [si:k] - t.1CKaTb shy Uai] - P06KVI, 3aCTeH'-It.1Bbli1 sincere [sin'si] - VlcKpeHHVli1 slightly ['slaitli] - He3HaYVlT611bHO talented ['trelntid] -TallaHTllViBbli1 typist ['taipist] - MaWVlHt.1CTKa vary ['v£ri] - MeH5ITbC5I waiter ['weit] - 0<pVlu.VlaHT waitress ['weitris] - o<pVIVlaHTKa witty ['witi] - OCTPOYMHbli1 
li ... :!It g Answer the questions: 1) How do American schoolchildren and students look for summer jobs? 2) Why do they want summer jobs? 3) What are some common jobs students take? 4) Do you think that it is a good idea for students to work during summer vaca- tion? Explain your answer. 5) Which of the vacation jobs described here would you like to have? Why? 6) What kind of work can students do in your country to make some money? Te Job Interview 1 . Ho to make a goo impression: ./ 1 ) Be on time for the interview. t.\) p 2) Speak plainly and clearly. l. 0 3) Always be polite. "- / I .{ 4) Look at the interviewer. ,. J 'f 5) Sit comfortably; don't slouch. , 6) Answer the questions. i 7) Be sincere and honest. ..,;..a , -. 8) Dress neatly. _. -- '- .' I 9) Do not chew gum. 10) Thank the interviewer for his time and consideration. R .' 1 . Discus&. Which student do you think will get the job? Why? What will you wear when you go to an interview? With another student, role pia jo intervie for the class Th interviewer asks these questions: 1 } What kind of work would you like to do? 2} What salary do you want to earn? 3) Why do you want to work here? 4) How did you get a.long with your last employer? 5) How did you get along with your fellow workers? 6) Would you be able to work on Saturdays? on Sundays? Overtime? 7) Where do you go to school? 8) What is the last grade you completed? 9) What are your hobbies? WORDLIST clearly ['kligli] - StCHO complete [kgm'pli:t] - 3aKaHYVlBaTb consideration [kgn,sidg'reif( g )n] - BHVlMaHl-1e fellow worker ['felg{ u) 'wg:kg] - KOJlJlera get along - J1(lAl-1Tb neatly [' n i:t Ii] - aKKypaTHo overtime ['guvgtai m] - cBepxYPOYHO plainly ['pleinIi] - npocTo salary ['seel gri] - 3apnJlaTa slouch [slautf]- CyryllVlTbCSt ImnD m 
J 51 F · F 15. Listen and read. Not necessary "Freddy, does your little brother talk yet?" asked a friend of the family. "No," answered Freddy. "He doesn't need to talk. All he needs to do is to cry, and he gets everything he wants." Not listening Mother What are you{eading, Maggie? Maggie I don't know. Mother You don't know? But you were reading aloud, so you ought to know. Maggie Well, I was reading aloud, but I was not listening. The pull "You naughty boy! I'll send you to bed without any supper." "Well, what about my medicine that I have to take after meals?" A considerate son "Daddy, buy me a drum please." uGh, no. You'll play it and disturb me in my work." "But I'll play it when you're asleep." She was thinking "Mary, have you eaten all the sweets without thinking of your little brother?" UNo! I was thinking of him the whole time. I was afraid he would come be- fore I had finished them." 16. Fill in the table with the tense forms you met in the texts above. Simple Progressive Perfect Perfect Progressive Present Past Future 17. Act out the dialogue using the table. WORDLIST be afraid ['freid] - 60SlTbCSl be asleep ['sli:p] - cnaTb considerate [kn'sid(  )rit] - BHMaTeJ1bHbl disturb [dis't:b] - MewaTb drum [drAm] -6apa6aH medicine ['medsin] -J1eKapCTBO naughty ['n:ti] - HenOCJ1ywHbli1. KanpLt13Hbli1 whole ['hu1] - BeCb, Bce yet [jet] -y>Ke m I!JmD 
DEVELOPMENTS 18. Listen and read. Rearrange the passages below to make a well-known fairy-tale. Cinderella By Charles Perrault Story summary 1) Suddenly, Cinderella's fairy godmother appeared and told her that she would see to it that she pould go. The fairy godmother turned a pumpkin into a beautiful coach; six mic into six horses; a rat into a coachman; and six lizards \ into footmen. Then she turned Cinderella's rags into a beautiful gown and ) gave her a lovely pair of little glass slippers. As the coach pulled away, the fairy godmother warned Cinderella to leave before the stroke of midnight. She told her that at midnight all would be as it had been before the magic spell. 2) The prince found the slipper and pronounced that he would marry the maiden whose foot fit the slipper. His servant carried the slipper from home to home and tried it on all the young maidens. At last he came to the home of Cinderella and her stepsisters. Each stepsister tried to squeeze her foot into the slipper, but could not. When Cinderella asked to try it on, her stepsisters laughed. But the gentleman said that he had been ordered to try it on all the young ladies of the kingdom. 3) Forced by her cruel stepmother and stepsisters to do all the work, Cin- derella often sat by the chimney when her work had been done. In fact, this is how she got her name; they called her Cinderella because she was always covered with cinders. 4) Cinderella arrived at the ball, and the prince fell in love with her at first sight. The two danced all night. Then, at 11 :45, Cinderella ran off as quickly as she could. She arrived home just before her stepsisters. When her stepsisters returned, they told Cinderella about the beautiful princess who had appeared at the ball. WORDLIST again [Igen] - on51Tb at first sight ['f:st 'sait] - C nepBoro B3rJ151p,a ball [b: 1] - 6an carry ['kreri] - HeCTVI chimney [,tfim n i] - AblMOXOA cinders ['sindz] - 30na coach [kutf] - KapeTa coachman ['kutfmn] - Kyyep cover ['kA v] - nOKpblBaTb cruel ['krul] - >KeCToKVlt:1 drop [drp] - YPOHVlTb fairy ['f£ri] - <pe fall in love with [f=:>:1 in 'IA v wi 0] - BJ1106V1TbCSJ fit perfectly [fit 'p:fiktli] - 3A. npt.1i1Tt.1Cb Bnopy fix [fiks] - 3A. ynO>KVlTb BonOCbl flee [fli:] (fled. fled) - 6e>KaTb, cnacaTbC51 6ercTBoM footman ['futmn] - J1aKei1 force [f:s] - 3A. npVlHy>KAaTb forgive [f'giv] (forgave, forgiven) - npOCTVlTb glass slippers ['gla:s 'slips] - 3A. XPYCTal1bHble TY- cpenbKVI godmother ['gd,mAo] - KpeCTHa MaTb gown [gaun]-3A. Hap51A however [hau'ev] - OAHaKO kingdom ['kil)dm] - KoponeBcTBo lizard ['lizd] - SJLl\epu.a lords of the court [k3:t] - npVlABopHble magic spell ['mre<uik 'spel] - B0J1we6cTBo maiden ['meidn] - 3A. AeBywKa mate [meit] - 3A. BTopa51 Ty<peJ1bKa mice [mais] - MblWVI midnight ['midnait] - nOI1HOYb order (':d] - npVlKa3aTb pair [p£] - napa pronounce [prlnauns] - npOVl3HOCVlTb pumpkin ['pAmpkin] - TblKBa rags [rregz] - I10XMOTb rat [rret] - Kpblca squeeze [skwi:z] - 3A. 3acYHYTb stepmother ('steplmAo] - MayeXa stepsister ['step,sist] - CBOAHaSJ ceCTpa strike [straik] (struck, struck) - 3A. np06V1Tb (0 yacax) try on ('trai =:>n] - npVlMepTb warn [Iw:n] - npeAynpeAVlTb I!m[Dm 
5) The next night the ball was to continue. Again, as soon as thf left, Cinderella's fairy godmother appeared, and Cinderella, too, ball. This time, however, Cinderella almost forgot to leave. When st first stroke of midnight, she fled. But as she did, she dropped one slippers. 6) One day the king's son gave a ball to which Cinderella's step ers wer  invited. Cinderella helped them dress and fix their hair, and when they left for the ball, she began to cry, for she, too, wanted to go. 7) Of course, the slipper fit perfectly. What's more, Cinderella had the mate in her pocket. Cinderella and her prince were married. Being kind as well as beautiful, Cinderella forgave her stepsisters. She gave tt'm ,home in the palace and married them to two lords of the court. epsisters nt to the ieard the her glass ( I KEY Forced by her cruel stepmother and stepsisters to do all the work, Cinde- rella often sat by the chimney when her work was done. In fact, this is how she got her name; they called her Cinderella because she had been always covered with cinders. One day the king's son gave a ball to which Cinderella's stepsisters were invited. Cinderella helped them dress and fix their hair, and when they left for the ball, she began to cry, for she, too, wanted to go. Suddenly, Cinderella's fairy godmother appeared and told her that she would see to it that she could go. The fairy godmother turned a pumpkin into a beautiful coach; six mice into six horses; a rat into a coachman; and six li- zards into footmen. Then she turned Cinderella's rags into a beautiful gown and gave her a lovely pair of little glass slippers. As the coach pulled away, the fairy godmother warned Cinderella to leave before the stroke of midnight. She told her that at midnight all would be as it had been before the magic spell. Cinderella arrived at the ball, and the prince fell in love with her at first sight. The two danced all night. Then, at 11 :45, Cinderella ran off as quickly as she could. She arrived home just before her stepsisters. When her step- sisters returned, they told Cinderella about the beautiful princess who had appeared at the ball. The next night the ball was to continue. Again, as soon as the stepsisters left, Cinderella's fairy godmother appeared. and Cinderella, too, went to the ball. This time, however, Cinderella almost forgot to leave. When she heard the first stroke of midnight, she fled. But as she did, she dropped one of her glass slippers. The prince found the slipper and pronounced that he would marry the maiden whose foot fit the slipper. ,His servant carried the slipper from home to home and tried it on all the young maidens. At last he came to the home of Cinderella and her stepsisters. Each stepsister tried to squeeze her foot into the slipper, but could not. When Cinderella asked to try it on. her step- sisters laughed. But the gentleman said that he had been ordered to try it on all the young ladies of the kingdom. Of course, the slipper fit perfectly. What's more, Cinderella had the mate in her pocket. Cinderella and her prince were married. Being kind as well as beautiful, Cinderella forgave her stepsisters. She gave them a home in the palace and married them to two lords of the court. m I!1mD 
.., :::1 . '" g p.... ,at. L r I 6 19. Answer the questions. Knowledge (3HaHMe): 1) How many people were in Cinderella's family? 2) Who made it possible for Cinderella to go to the ball? 3) What did Cinderella lose on the palace steps? Comprehension (noHMMaHMe)( 1) Why couldn't Cinderella complain to her father? 2) How did Cinderella help her stepsisters prepare for the ball? 3) How did Cinderella's fairy godmother help her? Application (Mcnonb30BaHMe): Jj 1) If you were Cinderella's friend, how might you have helped her? 2} -retend that you are Cinderella. How did you feel when you saw yourself in the mh rOI tlf+r your fairy godmother finished with you? 1 3) If you were Cinderella, how would you treat your stepsisters now that "- you are a princess? Analysis (aHanM3): 1) List some of the stepmother's good and bad qualities. 2) Choose one character from the story and write a character sketch. 3) If you were Cinderella, how might you try to change your stepmother's feelings toward you? Synthesis (cMHTe3): 1) If Cinderella's stepmother had shown love for her, how might the story have been different? 2) Create a new name for Cinderella now that she is a princess. Explain why you chose that name. Evaluation (OL\eHKa): 1) Why, do you think, did the stepmother treat Cinderella as she did? 2) Which would you choose: to live with your family in your home or to live in a palace as a prince or princess? 3) Did you like this story? Why or why not? 20. Russian composer Sergei Pr.okofiev wrote wonderful music to the ballet "Cinderella". If you have a chance to see the ballet or just listen to the music, you will enjoy every minute of it! 21. As Cinderella, write a thank you note to your fairy godmother for all she has done. . 'Dear fairy Cfodmothu, 22. Write about Cinderella's lifp after she married the prince. 3 KHHra AI1 \.lTeHH K Y4e6HHKY «C4aCTI1. aHrl1.-2». IJlmD m 
23. Listen and read. Jerome K. Jerome - famous English humorist. He is translated into all European languages. His most popular book is IIThree men in a boat." Absent-mindedness By Jerome K. Jerome Mrs. Pratt went to see her mother. Her husband said that he would come later with the baby and a complete change of clothing. At eleven o'clock sharp Pratt started on his way with the baby carriage. "I know I forgot something," muttered Pratt. He stopped for the fourth time to scratch his head. "Blanket, hat, diapers, socks," he thought. "No, I have those things. There is something missing. I will start at the baby's head and work dow- nwards. I have a hat, sweater, pants, and socks. What did I forget?" Pratt started with the socks and worked up to the hat. Then he went thro- ugh a day in baby's life from morning until night. Pratt still did not remember. He was walking slowly when he met his friend, Stillkins. "Stillkins," said Pratt, "think about your family. Tell me what your babies wear from morning until night." "Seems to me," said the amazed Stillkins, "you are thinking too hard. II "You see," added Pratt, "I'm taking the baby to his mother, but I forgot one of his things. Can you remind me what it is." Stillkins suggested, "Sweater?" "No, I've thought about that a dozen times. II Stillkins added, "Diapers? Socks? Pants?" Pratt listened to the hints, but said that he had all of those things. Stil- Ikins started to make some wild guesses. "A teddy-bear? A doll?" Pratt shook his head to say no. Stillkins became interested in the prob- lem. He forgot his own business and walked on with Pratt. In a little while they met their friend, Mowitt. Pratt said, "Mowitt, I forgot something for the baby. Perhaps you can tell me what it is?" "Diapers," said Mowitt. Pratt yelled at him, and Stillkins added a few words. Mowitt gave a few more suggestions. Mowitt decided to join Stillkins and Pratt. He argued fiercely with Stillkins abo- ut how to dress a baby. Pratt's steps became slower and slower as he approac- .a hed his destination. By the time they reached the gate of the » ' baby's grandmother, the group had increased in number. Each man was loudly telling his opinion about what a three- .<;. ,. week old baby would and would not wear. ..... et. ,'_ (i riagTeh to :;.ad while Pratt pulled the baby car- q; Two cries of feminine delight greeted Pratt. Pratt's wife and her mother ran down the path to meet him. "Our little darling!" said Mrs. Pratt as she put her hands under the hood. Then she stared angrily at Pratt, and Pratt's knees shook. "I know I forgot something, Lizzie," he said. I have been trying to remember. Stillkins and Mowitt tried to help me remember ." "Where is the baby?" yelled Mrs. Pratt. . . - {!).-.'. '\. . {  I \  l t \. ... . . ..-  .- . o -- .. ...- L -(0\ . . - - , I -....... .. . D HI Unit 2 'A -.  
24. Write out all the verbs from the text. Divide them into regular and irregular. Give 3 forms for the irregular verbs. Regular to start Irregular to go-went-gone .... ....... .......... .... ..... ...... ............ ..................... ... ......... ... ............ ...... ......... ............ ... ... ... ... ... ...... ...... 25. Explain what the following phrase means: "Where is the baby?" yelled Mrs. Pratt. While explaining use as many erbs from the above table as you can. ... 26. Describe Mr. Pratt's house as you imagine it. 27. Imagine and describe the house where Mrs. Pratt's mother lives. You can draw it if you like. 28. Answer the questions, please. 1) Where and when does the story take place? 2) Who are the main characters? 3) What is one of the main characters like? 4) Who is your favourite character? Why? 5) Which part of the story do you like best? 6) What do you remember most about the story? 7) Do you know other stories and books by this author? 8) Would you like to read another book by this author? Why? WORDLIST a dozen times [dAzn] -AeC5ITK pa3 absent-mindedness ['rebsnt'maindidnis]- paCCe5lHHOCTb amazed ['meizd] -YABJ1eHHblt1 approach ['prutf]- nOAXOAVlTb, np6J1V1)1(aTbCS1 argue ['a:gju:] - cnopVlTb baby ['beibi] - pe6eHoK baby carriage ['beibi 'kreri<t5] - AeTCKa51 K01l5lCKa blanket ['blreIJkit] - OAeSl1l0 change ['ijeincB] -3A. CMeHa clothing ['kluoiIJ] - OAe>KAa complete [km'pli:t] - nOJ1Hbl delight [di'lait] - BOCTopr destination Ldesti'neifn] - MeCTO Ha3HayeHLt151 diaper ['daip] - nOAry3HIt1K feminine ['femnin] - >KeHcKi1 fiercely ['figsli] - Helt1CTOBO greet [gri:t] - npVlBeTCTBOBaTb guess [ges] -AOraAKa hint [hint] - HaMeK hood [hud] - Bepx (K0J151CKVI) husband ['hAzbdnd] - M}')K in a little while ['litl wail] - HeMHoro norOA5I increase [in'J<ri:s] - YBellVlYIt1BaTbC5I join [cBin] - npVlCOeAIt1H5ITbC5I knee [n i:] - KOJ1eHO loudly ['laudli] - rpoMKo miss [mis] - HeAOCTaBaTb, He XBaTaTb mutter [mAtd] -60pMoTaTb opinion [d'pinjn] - MHeHlt1e, B3fJ1S1A path [pa: e] - AOpO)l(Ka reach [ri:tf] - AocTrHyrb remind [ri'maind] - HanOMHTb scratch [skrretf] - yeCaTb seem [s i: m] - Ka3aTbC5I shakeUeik] (shook,shaken)-Tp5lcT,KaYaTb sharp Ua:p] -TOYHO, pOBHO stare [st£d] - YCTaBVlTbC5I step [step] - war suggest [sd'cBest] - npeAnOJ1araTb try [trai] - nblTaTbC5I wild [waild] - AKVlt1, HeBep05lTHbli1 yell [jel] - KpYaTb Unit 2 m 
.n.opore APY3b5l! Tenepb Mbl XOTM HaYllTb BaC npa- BllbHO CAellaTb nCbMeHHOe nprJlaWe- He no CllY4alO AHst pO)f(tJ.eHLi151 IlLII APyro- ro npa3AHKa  OTBeTTb Ha Hero. S BellLi1K06pTaH VI AMepVlKe cyw.e- cTByeT cneu.allbHbl STVIKeT nLIICbMeHHoro o6w.eHLi151. ECllLi1 Bbl YCBoeTe ero, TO o6w.e- HLlle C BaM AOCTaBT APyrM lllOA5IM MHO- ro paAOCTlI1. )l(ellaeM ycnexa! 
1'. Listen, read and try to give a back translation.. Etiquette is based on three very important principles: Treat others as you want to be trea- ted. Every one of us has to be treated with kindness and respect. If we hope to receive kindness and respect from other people, we must treat them with the same. Beauty is as beauty does. This means that our personal beauty depends on our be- , haviour rather than on our physical appea-  ranee. I n other words, it is how we act rather than how we appear that makes us ugly or beautiful. No matter what we look like, crude behaviour can make us ugly, while gracious behaviour can make us beautiful in a very special way. A thing of beauty is a joy forever! Think about it. When you are around somet- hing that is ugly, you feel sad and depressed. On the other hand, when you are around so- mething that is beautiful you feel inspired and happy. Being around a person who is ugly becau- se of crude behaviour is often sad and dep- ressing. However, being around a person who is beautiful because of gracious beha- viour is often inspiring. Generally speaking, people do not want to be around a person who makes them feel depressed. Instead, they want to be around someone who makes them feel good. LITENESS "Behaviour is a mirror in which everyone displays his image." Goethe WORDLIST appear ['pi) - nOSJBJ1SJTbCSJ, Ka3aTbCSJ be based - 6blTb OCHOBaHHblM be treated ['tri:tid) - OTHOCTbCSJ K, 06paLllaTbcSJ C beauty ['bju:ti) - KpaCOTa behaviour [bi'heivi] - nOBeAeHe crude [kru:d) - rpy6b1i1 depend on [di'pend] -3aBVIceTb OT depressing [di'presil]] - rHeryLllVli1, TS1rocTHbli1 etiquette [eti'ket] -3TKeT feel depressed [fi:ldi'prest) (felt, felt) - YYBCTBO- BaTb nOAaBJ1eHHblM feel inspired [in'spaid) -YYBcTBoBaTb BAOXHOBneH- HblM, BooAyweBJ1eHHblM forever [f'rev) - HaBcerAa generally [,<tenrli) -06bIYHO, Bo06Llle gracious ['greifs] - pacnOJ1araIOLllVlt1, Be)J(JlLt1Bbli1 however [hau'ev] - OAHaKO, TeM He MeHee important [im'p:tnt) - BIDKHbli1 instead of [in'sted] - BMeCTO, B3aMeH joy [<Bi) - PaJJ.OCTb, BeCeJ1be kindness ['kaindnis) -A06poTa look like - BblrllSJAeTb KaK, nOXOALt1Tb Ha mean [mi:n) (meant, meant)-3HaYVITb. 03HayaTb need [ni:d) - Ha.Qo6HOCTb, H}')KAa no matter [mret) - HeBa>KHO, He MeeT 3HaYeHSJ personal ['p:snl) - nYHbli1 physical appearance ['fizikl'pirns) - BHewHi1 BVIA probably ['prbbli] - BepoS1THo rather than - cKopee yeM, B 60J1bWe CTeneHVI respect [ri'spekt] -YBIDKeHe sad [sred] - neYMbHbli1 special ['speJ1] - oc06b1i1, cneu.VlMbHbli1 ugly ['Agli] - cTpawHbli1, YPOA/lVIBbli1 I1lmD m 
I KEY -i' .t  .. 3TMKeT OCHOBaH Ha TpeX O'leHb Ba>KHbIX npMHLJ.MnaX: OTHOCTeCb K APyrM TaK, KaK Bbl XOTTe, '-IT06bl OTHOCJlCb K BaM. K KIDt(AO- MY '-IeJlOBeKY HaAO OTHOCTbC51 nO-A06pOMY  C YBa>KeHeM. ECJl Mbl HaAeeMC Ha A06poe  YBa>KTenbHOe OTHOWeHe CO CTOpOHbl APyr1-1X JltOAe, Mbl AOn>KHbl OT- HOCTbC51 K HM TaK >Ke. KpaCOTa npOBJl51eTC51 B KpaCBbIX nocTynKaX. 3TO 03Ha'-laeT, '-ITO HaWa n4Ha51 KpaCOTa 3aBit1Cit1T B 60nbWeC1 CTeneH OT HaWero nOBeAeHit151, '-IeM OT cp3it1L1eCKX AaHHbIX. HbIM CJlOBaM, TO. KaK Mbl BeAeM Ce651, CKOpee, 4eM TO, KaK Mbl Bblrm- Ait1M. AenaeT HaC YPOAJlBbIM Jlit1 npeKpaCHbIM. He3aBit1CMO OT Toro, KaK Mbl BblrnAM, rpy60e nOBeAeHe MO>KeT CAenaTb Hac YPOAJlBbIM, TorAa KaK npVl51T- Hoe nOBeAeHe YKpawaeT Hac nO-CBoeMY. KpaCOTOC1 BOCTopratOTC51 BcerAa. nOAYMaC1Te 06 STOM. HaXOA51Cb P51AOM C 4eM- TO OTTanKBatO1-1M, Bbl rPYCTHbl 1-1 nOAaBneHbl. C APyroC1 CTOpOHbl, KorAa P51AOM eCTb 4TO-TO npeKpaCHoe, Bbl ow.yw.aeTe BooAyweBlleH1-1e 1-1 C'-IaCTbe. HaXOA51Cb C Llell0BeKOM, Ybe rpy60e nOBeAeHit1e OTTan Kit1 BaeT, Bbl rPYCTHbl it1 nOAaBlleHbl. TorAa KaK '-IenOBeK, npeKpaCHblC1 CBOit1M 06xOAit1TellbHb1M nOBeAeH1-1- eM. '-IaCTO BooAyweBl151eT. TaK, lltOA1-1 He XOT51T HaXOATbC51 P51AOM C YenOBeKOM, KOTOpblC1 npO3BOAit1T Ha HX yrHeTatOw.ee Bne4aTlleH1-1e. BMeCTO SToro, OH XOT51T 6blTb P51AOM C TeM, C KeM OH YYBCTBYIOT ce651 XopOWO. " 'fIE Writing invitation cards 2. Read the following and try to remember. People send invitations on different occasions. Your invitation will be a gracious one if it includes all of this necessary infor- mation: Who ... is being invited. What ... the event is. Why... the event is taking place. When... the event is taking place (the ex- act date, and the time it is to begin and end). Where ... the event is taking place (the address and telephone number). Whenever you receive an invitation, it is important that you R.S.V.P. What does R.S.V.P. mean? R.S.V.P. stands for repondez, s'il vous plait. These are French words which mean "please reply." To R.S.V.P. means to tell the person who sent you the invitation whether you will attend the event. fr' (\  .. ...--  -, ( tJ'"  . ...  .t> t... ), -+ ,. "'11._ .' "" t ,\ ..... @ . ""  - I think 1111 have a party. -If you want anyone to come, you'll need to send out invita- tions. WORDLIST attend ['tend] - noceaTb event [i Ive n t] - C06blTVle exact date [ig'zrekt'deit] -TOHa AaTa important [im'p=:>:tgnt] - Ba)f(HbIVi include [in'klu:d] - BKJlIOaTb invitation Linvi'teiJn] - npVlrJ1aWeHVle m I!1mD necessary ['nesgsgri] - He06xoAVlMbl R.S.V.P. -OTBeTbTe, nO>KaJlyi1cTa reply [ri'plai] - OTBeTVlTb take place [teik'pleis] - npOVlCXOA1-1Tb whenever [wen'evg] - KorAa 6bl HVI 
Thank-you notes " It is very common in Britain and America to write a letter to thank someone  for a meal or a birthday party. You often write this kind of note on a pretty card. Every thank-you letter should include: the date, a greeting, a sentence which says thank you for the specific visit/ gift/ special deed, one or two sentences explaining why you are thankful, or in what way you appreciated the visit/ gift/ special deed, an ending J including your name. To make sure the letter gets to the right person, you will need to address the envelope correctly. If you are sending a letter to: a boy of 13 years or less, put the word Master before his name, a girl of 13 years or less, put the word Miss before her name, a male of 14 years or more, put the title Mr. before his name, a female of 14 years or more, put the title Ms. before her name. To Mike come to 5 Green St. on Sunday 15th May at 4 p.m. There will be a teddy bear party. R.S. V.P. John May 15, 16 1}ear Ann, 1hank you for Invitin,9 m to your l?irthday rarty. I had a 3reat time.! I sre.claU:J e.njoyed th _qams and the. delicious food. I wiLL re.me.m"e.r the. rarty for a lon.9 time. 1hanks a,9aln! Mike: WORDLIST acceptance [gk'septgns] - corJJace npVlHTb npVlrJJallJeHt.1e apology [d'plgcBi] - Vl3BVlHeHVle appreciate [g'pri:fieit] - BblCOKO LleHTb, 6JJarOAapl'1Tb correctly [kg'rektli] - npaSVlJJbHO, sepHO date [deit] -AaTa deed [di:d] -nOCTynOK, AeCTBit1e delicious r di'lifas] - BKYCHbl ending ['endiI)] - OKOHYaHe, KOHeu envelope ['envlJup] - KOHBepT especially [is'pefgli] -- oc06eHHo explain [ik'splein] - 06bSlCHTb KOMy-n60 You can R.S.V.P. in person. You can R.S.V.P. by telephone. You can R.S.V.P. in writing. A written R.S.V.P. should include: a thank you for being invited. and an acceptance (which means yes, I will come) , or a refusal (which means no, I cannot come). A refusal should include an apology and a reason for the refusal. female ['fi:meil] - 3A. AesywKa food [fu:d] - eAa greeting ['gri:tiI)] - npll1SeTCTBVle less lies] - MeHbwe male [meil] -3A. MonoAo£:1lfenoseK person lpd:sn] - yenOBeK, I1V1U.0 reason ['ri:zn] - npVlYVlHa refusal [ri'fju:zgl] - OTKa3 sentence [Isentgns] - npeAflO>KeHVle special ['spe.n] - OC06bl£1, oco6eHHbl£:1 specific [spglsifik] - OC06bl, cneUll1anbHbl&.1 thankful r8rel)kful] - 6I1arOAapHblilt to make sure rmeik 'fu] - YT06b1 y6eAuTbc Im!EI 71 
Miss elL o fine Jane. Kosw Cik!J0016 c-',: t I' L  .....--,) May 15, 16 'Dear G-randma, 1hank you for th scarf. I received it y the maiL yesterday. It was kind of you to ranan"er my irthday with a .9ift. I arrreciatt the. effort you made. fa d ana send mt. the scarf. 1hank you aain! IA>ve, Mikt. 'Dear Mr. Smith, 1hank you vuy much for the. dw- clous meaL. We.aLLoyed ourselves very much and learnt a Lot of ne.w .9Lish words! Yours, (sn your name.). WORDLIST appreciate ['pri:Jieit] - BblCOKO u.eH, VlTb 6J1aro- AapVlTb be gracious ['greifs] - 6btTb J1106e3HbIM, 6J1aro- AClPHblM daisy ['deizi] - MaprapVlTKa delicious meal [di'Iif smi:l] - OyeHb BKYcHa eAa effort ['eft] - yc VlJ1 Vie enjoy [in'cBi] - nOJlyyaTb YAOBOJ1bCTBVle get [get] - nOJ1yyaTb gift [gift] - nOAapoK I wish you could see them. - )f(aJ1b, YTO Bbl VlX He BIt1AVlTe. kind [kaind] - A06pbt lovely [alA vIi] - npeJleCTHbti1 mail [m eil] - nOYTa, nOYTOBa KoppecnoHAeHu.It1 m II!mID Address your envelope this way: If you want to be gracious, you will write a kind and sincere letter whenever someone: has writte n to you, has given you a gift. You should respond as soon as possible, preferably within one week of the occasion. 'Dear Mrs. Arden, 1hank you very much for the ook It IS a LoveLY.9'ft and it wiLL always remind me. of rand when I read it. k,gain, many thanks, Yours sincerely, Mary March 2:1, 1fj6 'Dear ';ar\?ara, 1hanks very much for t eautiful flowers. Whitt. daisie.s are. my favoritts. I wish you could su them.1he.y make. my room so "rht and cheerful l' m n "dta already. L-Ove, Mary occasion ['kei3n] - C06b1Ti-1e possible ['psibl] - B03MO)f(Hbl preferably ['prefrebIi] - npeAnOYTVlTeJlbHO receive [ri'si:v] - nOJlyyaTb, npVlHi-1MaTb remind [ri'maind] - HanOMVlHaTb respond [ri'spnd] - OTBeyaTb, OT3bIBaTbC, peari-1pOBaTb send [send] - nOCblJlaTb sincere [sin'si] - VlCKpeHHi-1i1 someone ['SAm WAn] - KTO-TO, KTo-Jl1t160 stamp [stremp] - MapKa whenever [wenlev] - BCKi-1i1 pa3, KorAa; KorAa 6bt Hi-1 within [wi'oin] - B TeyeHi-1e Yours sincerely [j:s sin'sili] - VlCKpeHHe Baw 
3. Write an invitation to your friends for a birthday party. 4. Send a thank-you letter after being on a visit at someone's pla- ce. The Greeting / " .- " " 1';1;;:;- ",- \, \;\', r ' .\, , -   ..' .  oe'" . , - "! #J.' , ,.}) 'I' 'U1£7' " ;I fl'/.' " ,I;. t'l .' l' ' ..",- I :   ",  Tenepb Mbl XOTL1M BaM HanOMH1-1Tb, KaK HaYLt1HaTb ncbMO 1-1 KaK ero 3aBepwaTb. 04eHb Sa)f(HO HaLt1HaTb n1-1CbMO c npaSLt1JlbHOrO o6pa- eH51 1-1 npaS1-1JlbHO 3aKOH41-1Tb ero. B 3TOM OTpa)f(aeTC KYJlbrypa 4eJlOBeKa. Mbl XOTLt1M nOM04b saM, nOTOMY YTO KYJlb TYPHbl 4eJlOSeK 4YSCTByeT ce6 S )f(Lt13HLt1 ysepeH- Hee. J Writing to a stranger You do not know his or her name. Begin like this: Dear Sir, (if it is a man) or Dear Sirs, Dear Madam, (if it is a woman). Don't forget the comma. Writing to someone you know: Dear Mr. X, Dear Mrs. X, (a married woman) Dear Miss X, (an unmarried girl) Dear Ms. X, (a woman, either married or single. It's like Mr. for men) Dear Professor X, Dear Dr. X, (this may be a medical doctor or an acade- mic doctor) Writing to someone you know quite well. Begin like this: Dear Ann, Dear Peter, This is how English people write to their relatives: Dear Granny, Dear Dad, Dear Uncle, Writing to someone who is very close to you. Begin like this: Dearest Mary, Darling John, WORD LIST academic Lrekd'demik] -aKaAeMecKVli1, yeHbli1 begin like this - HaYHVI TaK close [k1Jus] - 6JlVl3KVlC1 comma ['kmd] -3anna darling ['da:liIJ] - .QoporoC1, MVlJlblC1 either... or... [aioJ] [:] -VlJ1V1... VlnVl... greeting ['gri:tiIJ] - npVlseTCTBVle know quite well- 3HaTb AOBOJlbHO xopowo married (woman) ['mrerid 'wumdn] -3aMH )f(eHll.\VlHa medical ['medik( d )1] - MeAVIVlHcKVli1 relative ['reldtiv] - pO.QCTBeHHVlK single [siIJgI] -XOJloCToC1, He3aMH someone ['sAmwAn] - KTO-HVl6YAb unmarried [An'mrerid] - He3aMH I!DI m 
Here is how to write the opening of your letter and how to make it look good. Write on the left-hand side of the paper. Don't begin at the edge. Leave a little space. Use a capital letter for each word. 'Dear knn, flat 1 5, L,omonosov St. fskov 1/5/CJ6 .1 5. Imagine you're staying in England. Which opening would you use if you wrote a letter to these people? I KEY Dear Sir or Madam, Dear Rita, Dearest Bruce, or Dearest Ann, 1) The London Science Museum, 2) Your pen friend, Rita, 3) Your boyfriend, Bruce or your girlfriend, Ann, 4) Your class friend. Dear Annie. The Ending nd the Signature The end of your letter must match the greeting. Writing to a stranger, end like this: I wok forward to hearln!] from you. Yours faithfulLy, (Miss). Mason WORDLIST as ever [rez 'ev] -- KaK BcerAa capital (letter) ['krepitl Clet)] -3arJlaBHaSl (6YKBa) edge ['ec\)] - Kpai1, KpoMKa ending ['cndilJ] - OKOHYaHe I look forward to hearing from you. - C HeTepneHVl8M y secTeH OT Te6S1. imagine [i'mrectin] - npeACTaBJlQTb ce6e leave [l i:v] (left, left) -. OCTaBJlS1Tb left-hand side-J1eBa cTopoHa match [mretf] -COOTBeTCTBOBaTb opening ['upnilJ] - Ha'aJlO, BcrynJ1et-ut1e mmID paper ['peip] -- 6YMara pen friend - APyr no nepenVicKe person ['p:sn] - yellOBeK send [se n d] (sent, sent) - nOCblJ1dTb, OTnpaBJ1Tb (nVlcbMo) signature ['signitf] - nOAnvtCb space ['speis] - npOCTpaHCTBO, MeCTO strar;ger ['strein<t] - He3HaKOMe[.l, nocTOpOHHt1i1 \.Iell0BeK use [ju:z 1- Cn0J1b30BaTb, npMeHTb 
Writing to someone you know, end like this: Yours sincerely, Yours, Yours ever, As ever, End like this: Write soon! Please write soon. I hope I'll hear from you soon. I hope you will write soon. I must end now. Always send best wishes or love to friends or to the family of the friend you are writing to: Give my love to your family. Regards to your family. ., Best wishes to you and all your family. See you soon. Looking forward to seeing you next week. I'll give you a ring next week. Writing to someone you know quite well, or someone you want to be friendly with, end: Regards, Best wishes, Love, Tom Steven Jim Men do not usually use "Love" when writing to each other. They can use "Regards", "Yours", or just sign their name. Both men and women should be careful about writing "Love" to each other, as the meaning might be misunderstood. Use another way to end if you are not sure. Writing to someone who is very close to you, End like this: Love, Lots of love, Sue Bruce Then you could put some kisses: XXXX Use a capital letter for the first word of the ending. Don't forget the comma. WORDLIST be careful ['kcgful] -6blTb OCTOpO)f(HbIM Best wishes to you and all your family. - HaVlflyywLt1e nO)f(enaHVI BaM VI Bawe£1 ceMbe. both [bgu8] - KaK... TaK Lt1 friendly ['frendli] -APecKVI£1, APecTBeHHbli1 Give my love to your family. - nepeAa£1Te npVlBeT Ba- we£1 ceMbe. I'll give you a ring next week. - S1 n03BOHIO BaM Ha cfleAYIOw.e£1 HeAene. I hope I'll hear from you soon. - s:1 HaAelOCb BCKope nonYYVlTb nl11CbMO OT Sac. I hope you will write soon. - s:1 HaAelOCb, Bbl MHe BCKO- pe HanVlWVlTe. I must end now. - s:1 AOJ1>KeH ce£1yac 3aKaHYVlBaTb. kiss [kis] - nou.eJ1yi1 look forward - O)f(VlAaTb C HeTepneHVleM Looking forward to seeing you. - C HeTepneHVleM >KJJ.Y BCTpeyVI C BaMVI. meaning ['mi:nilJ] -3HayeHVle, CMblCJ1 misunderstand LmisAndg'strend] (misunderstood, misunderstood) - HenpaBVlnbHO nOH5Hb Please write soon. - nO)f(aJ1y£1cTa, OTseTbTe nOCKO- pee. regards [ri'ga:d] - npVlBeT See you soon. - CKOPO YBVlAV1MC. sign [sain] - nOAnVlCblsaTb to kiss [kis] - u.enosaTb \vish [win - )f(enaHVle, nO)f(enaHVle Yours ever. - BcerAa Baw. Yours sincerely. - cKpeHHe Baw. I!lmD m 
This is the best place to write the ending, in the middle of the page: 'e.st wishe.s, knn P.s. P.S. means Postscript. This is a sentence or sentences you can add to the letter after the signature. If you have forgotten to write something in your let- ter, or you wish to add something else, then write it as a P.S. Keep any P.S. as short as possible. Example: Sa you on Monday. As tJlU, Kita f5. 'Von't for.9d to "rin.9 a "ook! Sign clearly who you are - man or woman. Never wr.ite "Bye-bye" or "Goodbye". These are spoken expressions only. Don't write the ending at the edge of the paper. 6. Read these Birthday and Mother's Day cards. !J.' Birthday Wish FOR SOMEONE SPECIAL WORDLIST add [red] - A06aBllTb fi II [fil] - HanOJ1 HTb gift [gift] -Aap in the middle of the page - B cepeAiIIHe CTpaHiliUbi fe. is a wonde.rful3ift ach year is an kdded treasure.. We. wish you Many more. years fllUd with haffine.ss... Without measure.! Warm Wishe.s On Your irthday! measure ['me3] - Mepa possible ['psibl] - B03MO)f(HbI spoken expression - pa3roBopHoe BblpIDKeHille III IBmD 
DAUGHTER, YOU'RE VERY SPECIAL TO ME May 8, 1994 My dearest Joan, Every year at Mother's Day I think, "I should be telling Joan how proud I am to be her mother instead of the other way around". Words cannot convey the joy and pride I have always felt in being your mother. So many parents are ashamed of their child- ren and their actions but with us you have always been a source of pride. We have rejoiced to observe what a good mother you are. You 1.. · have made sure you didn't make the mistakes I made. In years to come your girls won't remember how clean the floors were or how good their meals were but they'll always remember the time you spent doing things for and with them. Kirk has always been a wonderful father. He takes up so much time with them and shows an interest in all their activities. Throughout your life you have always shown the greatest love and concern. I hear so many mothers say how their daughters always criticize and make demands on them but you have always showed the greatest respect. No one could have a better son than Kirk has been to us. He has always been so caring, considerate, and understanding. He always se- ems to be concerned about our life and takes time to listen to all our health problems and activities. We love him very much. Natalie and Alison show the results of excellent parenting. They are so dependable, independent, thoughtful. They are also concerned about doing well in school, and enjoy sports. And so, on this Mothers Day, I want you to know you and your family are our greatest joy. We love you with all our hearts. Mother & Daddy . .WORDLIST be ashamed of ['feimd] - CTbIATbCSl ero-1160 be concerned about [kn's:nd] -6ecnoKoTbCSI 0 caring ['ke(r )il)] - 3a6oTl1BbI concern [kn's:n] -3a6oTa considerate [kn'sidrit] - BHMaTel1bHbli1 (KAPyn1M) convey [kn'vei] - BblpIDKaTb criticize ['kritisaiz] - KpVlTKOBaTb dependable [di'pendbl] - HaAe>KHbl£1 in years to come - npoWJ.YT rOAbi independent [,indi'pendnt] - He3aBi-1CMbli1J caMocTosrrenbHbI Joan [45un] -A>KoaH make demands on - npeAbSlBl1S1Tb Tpe6oBaHLt1S1 observe [b'Z:V] - Ha6J1tOAaTb parenting ['perantil)] - pOATeJ1bCKaSl3a60Ta pride [praid] - rOPAOCTb proud [praud] -roPAbI rejoice [ri'cB3is] - Pa.D.OBaTbCSI respect [ri'spekt] -YBIDKeHe source [S3:S] - i-1CTOHi-1K take up time- npOBOA1'1Tb BpeMSI thoughtful ['S3:tful] - AYMatO throughout [Sru:'aut) -epe3 I!DI 77 
JUST F R FUN Mark Twain Mark Twain constantly received letters and photographs from men who looked like him. One was from Florida and the likeness, as shown by the man's pictu- re, was really remarkable - so remarkable, indeed, that Mr. Clemens sent the following acknowledgement: "My dear Sir: I thank you very much for your letter and the photograph. In my opinion you are certainly more like me than any other of my doubles. In fact, I am sure that if you stood before me in a mirrorless frame I could shave by you." The King and the Painter There was a king who thought that he co- uld paint very well. His pictures were bad, but the people to whom he showed them were afraid of the king. They all said that they liked his pictures very much. One day the king showed his pictures to a great painter who lived in his country and aS8 ked, "I want to know what you think of my pic- tures. Do you like them? Am I a good painter, or not?" The painter looked at the king' s pictures and said, "My King, I think that your pictures are bad, and that you will never be a good painter. " The king was very angry and sent the pa- inter to prison. After two years the king wanted to see the painter again. "I was angry with you," he said, "because you did not like my pictures. Now forget all about it. You are a free man again, and I am your friend." For many hours the king talked with the painter, and even asked him for dinner. After dinner the king showed his pictures to the painter and asked, "Well, how do you like them now?" The painter did not answer anything. He turned to the soldier, who was standing near him and said, "Take me back to prison." '" \. . '" I. ... \ \ l \,1 00 l __ , r .. · l <v ,-s e- WORDLIST acknowledgement [dk'nlictmnt] - npVl3HaHt-1e be angry ['rel)gri] - cepAVlTbc51 constantly ['kJnstJntli] - nOCT051HHO double [dAbl] -ABOHVlK Florida ['flJrida] - tPnopVlAa in fact - cpaKTIlJyeCKVI in my opinion [d'pinjdn] - no MoeMY MHeHVlIO indeed [in'di:d] - B caMOM Aene m Unit 3 I( likeness ['laiknis] - CXOACTBO mirrorless frame ['n1irdl£s 'freim] - paMa 6e3 3ep- Kana prison ['prizn] - TlOpbMa really ['ridl i] - Aei1cTBVlTenbHo receive [ri'si:v] - nonyyaTb remarkable [ri'ma:kdbl] - YAVlBVlTenbHbJi1 shave Ueiv] (shaved, shaven) - 6pVlTb(C51) 
DEVEL ENTS 7. Listen and read. About the author Carol Ryrie Brink was born in Moscow, Idaho, on December 28, 1895. Carol loved living in Moscow, Idaho. She enjoyed the blue mountains, co- lourful wild flowers, and the great variety of birds. Since Moscow was a small town, everyone knew everyone else, and neighbours seerned more like family. Carol's father was so popular that he became the town's first mayor. She had quite a few pets, including a pony. She loved to tell herself stories as she rode her pony in the hills of Moscow. Carol went to college in Idaho and California. After she graduated, she married Raymond Brink. a Carol Ryrie Brink has written several books besides Caddie Woodlawn. However, Caddie Woodlawn is her favorite. In 1935, Carol won the John New- bery Medal for this book. The Rose is Red Caddie went back to school in February. She was glad to be back at school in time for Valenti- ne's Day, because that was always fun. On that day most of the children exchanged comics, and the girls got pretty Valentine's greeting cards. Tom had been thoughtful for several days be- fore Valentine's Day. "Caddie," he said, "I wish I had a silver dollar like you have! Why don't you spend it for Valenti- nes?" "A whole silver dollar for Valentines!" cried Caddie. She felt a little superior to Tom because she knew that he could never save his money. "Well, maybe not all of it," said Tom. "But you just ought to see the beauties they've got down at Dunnville store." Caddie considered the matter. It did not occur to her that Tom was hinting at a loan. But she kept her dollar for so long that she had grown a little rniserly. She had saved six pennies besides her silver dollar, and these she put in her pocket on February thirteenth. After school that day she started for the Dun- nville store. Hetty and Warren went home across the fields. But where was Tom? He had been the first one out of the schoolhouse, and now he was now- here to be seen. Caddie started running. As she came in sight of the Dunnvile store, she saw a familiar figure disappearing into the back door. Tom! But why the back door? And why was Tom so mysterious these days? Caddie went in and chose six penny comics. One for Tom, one for Warren, one for Hetty, and the rest for Maggie,_ Jane, and Lida. She was amazed at the r :"::"4'i 'Ji' :-.t: ' ... _  _ .. ',? tf: '. , .- ;" : :" < The rose is red,}  : The violet's blue, 'I\' Sugar is sweet, :\ :.  \ And so are you. , '-   · ,r.1 :)   ''P;\ - ,,,," J'£ . . ',:':=7-'=-''.' -".j.... . "  :.. '.. ..l-'....':" .... o.  ..' ::..........: WORDLIST amaze [dime iz] - Y,QBJlTb come in sight ['sait] - 3A. nOBllTbC disappear [.disdlpid] - VlCye3aTb hint [hint] - HaMeKaTb include [in'klu:d] - BKJltOyaTb loan [Jdun] -3aeM miserly ['maizdli] - cKyno mysterious [mi'stidris] - TaVlHcTBeHHbl, 3araAOYHbl occur to somebody [d'kd:] - npVlXO,QVlTb B rOJlOBY ride ['raid] (rode, ridden) a pony- KaTaTbC Ha nOH Unit 3 79 
sight of the most beautiful card that she had ever seen. It was all paper lace and roses and violets, and in the center of a pink heart was printed: The rose is red, The violet's blue, Sugar is sweet, And so are you. Caddie was sorry that she had left her dollar at home. This was so beauti- ful! But she wouldn't know to whom to give it. She wasn't "sweet on" anybody. "How much is it?" she asked the storekeeper just to satisfy her curiosity. "Fifty cents," Mr. Adams replied, "but I guess it's sold, Caddie. There's a young man in the back room here peeling potatoes to pay for it." "Oh!" Said Caddie. Now she knew. It was Tom! But was it for her, this lovely Valentine? It seemed impossible. Tom always gave her comics, and she thought them fun. Yet who was a better friend to Tom than she? No one, surely. She went home slowly, thinking. She knew that Tom wouldn't want anyone to know that he was peeling potatoes to earn a Valentine, so she locked his secret in her heart. It was the first secret she had ever known him to have from her. The next day the schoolhouse was full of whispering. Miss Parker tried to keep what order she could. Valentine's Day only came once a year. Mysterious envelopes kept appearing on desks; children were excited. Caddie hastily scanned her Valentines. She hadn't expected the "rose is red" one, but she couldn't stop looking to make sure. But it wasn't there. The comic ones were very funny, though, and there was a little bag of candy hearts from Sam Flusher. Altogether it was a good day. Still the "rose i$ red" Valentine did not appear, and Caddie began to think that Tom had got tired of peeling potatoes before he had paid for it. Then, when they came in from afternoon recess, she saw it lying on Katie Hyman's desk. Katie saw it, too, and blushed. It was the first Valentine that she had had that day, because she was so shy that no one gave her penny comics. Her little slim fingers trembled as she opened it. Everybody who had gathered around said: UOh!" because they recognized it as the best Valentine in the Dunnville Store. Katie turned it around and looked all over it, but there was no name on it anywhere. She was smiling more than they had ever seen her smile. Her eyes sparkled, almost as if they had tears in them. Caddie looked at Tom, but he was standing by the stove finishing an apple and talking with some of the boys, as if he had never heard of Valentines in his life. After school Hetty was all excited. "Caddie, did you see that great, big Valentine Katie Hyman got? Who do you suppose sent it? There wasn't any name, but I'm sur that Tom sent it. Don't you think so? I'm going to tell everybody so." WORDLIST at the sight - npVl BAe be sweet on smb - 6b1Tb BJ110611eHHblM B Koro- J111160 blush [blAn - KpaCHeTb creature rkri:tf ] - CYLLteCTBO curiosity Lkjuri'siti] - J11060nblTcTBo excitedly [ik'saitidli] - B036y)f(AeHHO expect [iks'pekt] -O>KTb fight [fait] (fought, fought)-cpa>KaTbcSJ, 60pOTbCSJ hastily ['heistili] - nocneWHO label ['leibl] - HaK/leViBaTb 3TLt1KeTKIll lace [leis] - KPY>KeBO peel [pi:l] - CTLt1Tb III I!1mD recess [ri Ises] - nepepblB recognize ['rekgnaiz] - Y3HaBaTb satisfy ('sretisfai] - YAOBJ1eTBopSJTb scan [skren] - paccMaTplllBaTb shy Uai] - 3acTeHIIIBblt1 slim [slim] - TOHKLt1 sparkle [ISpa: kl] - 6J1eCTeTb tremble ['trembl] - APO>KaTb, TpeneTaTb unusual amount of giggling - pe3MepHoe XIllXIIIKaHbe violet ['vailit] - <t>1-1allKa whisper ['wisp] - wemaTb 
r_ -, !2D-: SiR  g Caddie's heart jumped. If Hetty told, they would make Tom's life miserable. "Why, Hetty," she said gaily. "Who put that in your head? You know Tom can't save a cent. Then how do you suppose he could buy the finest Valentine in the store without any money?" "That's so," said Hetty. "I know! Maybe she got it for herself, just to make us think she had a beau." Busy with this happy thought, Hetty broke into a run. Caddie walked along more slowly. She was thinking: "I do everything with Tom. I'm much more fun than Katie. Why, she's afraid of horses and snakes and she wouldn't cross the river. I don't believe she's spoken three words to Tom in her life. But she's what you call a little lady, and I'm just a tomboy. Maybe there's something in this lady business after all." But just then Warren caught up with her and said: "Hey, let's go coasting! All this silly Valentine, sugar-plum stuff!" And she raced away with him, laug- hing, and eager to be the first one on the hill with her sled. 8. Answer the questions, please. Knowledge: 1) Who are the main characters in this story? 2) Where did Tom go after school? 3) What did he do in the store? Comprehension: 1) Why did Tom peel potatoes in the back room of the store? 2) How did Tom behave after he gave the best Valentine to Katie? 3) Why did he behave like this? Analysis: 1) Compare Katie and Caddie. How are they different? 2) Why do you think Caddie didn't tell Hetty the truth about Tom? Explain the reasoning behind your answer. Evaluation: 1) Which character would you like to be and why? 2) What valuable lesson can be learned from this story? 9. Create a beautiful Valentine's or friendship card to give to someone who is special to you. Use this rhyme: "The rose is red, The violet's blue, Sugar is sweet, And so are you." f 10. Tell what maintaining a friendship means. (Keeping a friends- hip going once it has started.) Maintaining a friendship Friendship is a loving relationship between two people. Friends respect each other, care about each other, remain true to each other, and overlook and forgive each other's faults. Do you agree? . . WORDLIST beau[bu]--KaBanep catch up [kretf.) (caught, caught) - AorOHS1Tb coast ['kust] - KaTaTbCS1 crop eager ['i:g] - CJ1bHO )f(eJ1atOLltLt1 miserable ['mizrbI] - HeclfacTHbl sled [sled] -- caHK snake [sneik] -3MeS1 sugar-plum stuff [fug'pIAmstAf] - CJ1(lAeHbKaS1 lfenyxa suppose [SlpUZ] - npeAnOJ1araTb tomboy ['t3mb3i] - AeBlfOHKa-COpBaHeL\ mmoID 
11. Make the following poster for St. Valentine's Day. Fill in the names of your classmates. o r class 1'1 es / I 12. Do you agree with ten good tips for keeping a friendship going? 1) Communicate with your friend. 2) Be honest. 3) Be loyal. 4) Keep secrets unless your friend is in danger. 5) Be supportive. 6) Try to be fun and optimistic. 7) Remember that neither one of you is perfect. a) Expect that your friend will sometimes disagree with you. 9) Do nice things for your friend. 10) Say good things about others. Is there anything you can add? 13. Was Caddie very good at keeping secrets? 14. Name some characteristics of a friendship that isn't worth maintaining. 15. Listen and read. What was wrong in he story? Friendship starts at home Two boys were delivering newspapers on their bicycles. One of the bicycles hit a rock, and the boy flew off the bike in one direction and the newspapers in another. The second boy rode up laughing and teasing. A neighbour came to the first boy's to help. The second boy rode on down the street. Seeing the boy's pride was hurt more than his body, the neighbour said, "It's kind of a low " 'J WORDLIST care (about) [k£] -3a6oTLt1TbCS1 fault [f:lt] - OWlt16Ka, BIt1Ha forgive [fd'giv] (forgave, forgiven) - npow.aTb loving ['IAvilJ] - npeAaHHbli1 overlook Luvd'luk] - He 06paw.aTb BHMaHIt1S1 relationship [ri'leiJnJip] -oTHOWeHlI1e, 83aVlMOOTHO- weHe remain (true) [ri'mein] - OCTa8aTbCS1 npaBAIt18blM no OTHoweHVltO APyr K APYry respect [ri'spekt] -YBa)f(aTb IS Unit 3 
blow to have your friend laugh when you've had a bad spill, isn't it?" As the boy packed the newspapers back in place, he replied, "He isn't my friend - he's my brother." 16. Make a poster "Maintaining a friendship", "Be a good fri- end. " Describing appearance 17. Imagine Tom's, Caddie's and Katie's appearance Describe them. 18.. In pairs, describe each other's appearance. tall. Jam He's thin. What does Caddie look like? s h 0 rt. Katie She's fat. slim. long short strai g ht  He's got curly What colour is her hair? dark hair She's got fair blonde red grey [;J eyes? They're ... (colour). What colour are her How old is   He's She's (about) ... (age). . ... , What's fh;I  wearing? He's She's wearing ... (clothes). I WORDLIST blow [bldu] - YAap danger ['deincBd] - onaCHOCTb deliver [di'livd] -AOCTaSJlS1Tb disagree Ldisd'gri:] - He cornawaTbCS1 have spill [spill -ynacTb . hit [hit] (hit, hit) - YAapa.1TbCS1, 3A. HalleTeTb honest ['nist] - yeCTHbJi1 hurt [hg:t] -3A. 3a)J,eTb low [ldU] - HVl3KVli1 loyal ['lidl] - BepHbl maintain [mein'tein] - nOMep)Ka.1BaTb perfect ['p g:fikt] - AeanbHbli1, cOBepweHHbl pride [praid] - rOPAOCTb rock [rk] - KaMeHb supportive [sd'p:tiv] -OKa3bIBaIOVli1 nOMOb tease [ti:z] - Apa3HVlTb I!lmD m 
T Aoporll1e APY3b! Mbl XOTlI1M, '-IT06bl, HaXOACb S WKOlle, Sbl CJ1eAOSallll1 30J10Tb1M npaSll1J1aM: OTHOClI1TbC K APyrll1M TaK, KaK 6bl SaM XOTeJ10Cb, '-ITo6bl OTHOClI1J1l11Cb K saM. OTHOClI1TbC K CSepCTHlI1KaM 1I1 83pOC- llblM, KOTopble OKpY)I(alOT sac s WKOlle, C ysa)l(eHlI1e.M. 6brrb OJ1arOAapHbiM TeM, KTO Y'-IlI1T sac xopoweMY. BHlI1aTb TOMY, KTO nOMO)l(eT saM CTaTb J1111'-1 HOCTblO. )l(eJ1aeM ycnexa! ." 
1500 1. Read the following quotations. Discuss them with a partner. "A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different because I was important in the life of a child." "Teachers pass the torch of learning h " on to ot ers. Plato Author Unknown "Education brings a child the W"orld." , "I teach to love, I love to teach... yjoyisnaeasured by the children I reach." Anonymous fan Kennedy WORDLIST anonymous ['nnims] - HeIt13BeCTHbl bank account ['kaunt] - 6aHKoBcKIt1 ceT be measured by ['me3d] - 6blTb 1t13MepeHHbiM bring [brilJ] (brought, brought) - npHOCIt1Tb child ['tfaild] - pe6eHoK drive [draiv] (drove, driven) - e3AIt1Tb B MaWHe education Ledju:'keif(  )n] - 06pa30BaHe joy ['cBil- paAOCTb learning ['l:nilJ] - yeHe, 06pa30BaHe matter ['mret] -It1MeTb 3HaeHe pass on [pa:s] - nepeAaBaTb reach [ri:tf] - AOCTraTb, 3A. OKa3blBaTb BJ1V15tHVle torch [t:tf] - ct>aKeJ1. CBeTO world ['w:ld] - Mlt1p, CBeT I!DI m 
I --1 r  - - --------- - -- . I ' 1 I " "The job of a teacher ! I "I t is the supreme art is to excite in the of the teacher young a boundless 1 I to awaken joy in I i of sense of curiosity I I ". . . I creatIve expreSSIon about life." I I and knowledge." I I f J I ' I I John Garrett I Albert Einstein I . -... 1'..... . : ' t I. . . , . . " "tI6 . - ",,' J " , . .. - -- - 1 II i ! ' "I vieW" education as 11 [ I the most important ! i 1 I subject which we  i i i . f as people are I t engaged in." I j ! II Abraham Lincoln II I ! I I  1'"..... .. J I -- ---- ___J I ! t "Teaching is love made visible." Anonymous .r f . '" 1. Show respect to teachers. They deserve it. WORDLIST art [a:t] - VlCKYCCTBO awaken ['weik()n] - np06Y>KAaTb (YYBCTBO) be engaged in [in'gei<td] -3aHVlMaTbCS1 yeM-J1Lt160 boundless ['baundlis] - 6e3rpaHVlYHbl, 6ecnpe- AeJ1bHblt1 creative [kri:'eitiv] - TBOpYeCKt1, C03Lt1ACiTeJ1bHbl curiosity [.kjuri':)siti] - JlI060nbITcTBO. J110603Ha- TeJ1bHOCTb deserve [di'z:v] - 3aCJ1}')KBaTb education [.edju:1keiJ{  )n] - BocnVlTaHe, 06pa30BaHe III I!lmD excite [iklsait] - B036Y'KAaTb, BOJ1HOBaTb expression [iks'preJ()n] - Bblpa>KeHVle job [<t:>b] - pa60Ta, 3aHS1TLt1e joy [,<ti] - PaAOCTb. BeCeJ1be life ['laifj - )f(Lt13Hb respect [ris'pekt] - YBa)f(eHLt1e sense [sens] - YYBCTBO subject ['sAb<tikt] - npeAMeT supreme [sju:'pri:m] - BbICWLt1i1 view [vju:] - paCCMaTpLt1BaTb visible ['vizbl] - BLt1AMbli1 
Social and polite customs . lead and emember or all our life. Do you think you are strong enough to ollow this advice? Don't smoke. It looks smart in old movi- es, and it seems that everybody does it. But that is just a clever form of advertising. Smoking is unhealthy. It is unpleasant and harmful to non-smo- kers, too, and a serious fire risk. It is offensive in public places like cafes and schools. Any form of addiction or excess is unhealthy, whether it is tobacco, alcohol, drugs, sugary things, or money. It may be a sign of not gro- wing up and not being able to cope. Do you know that 16th of November is the day when people all over the world quit smoking? Do you know that every year 3 million pe- ople die of smoking? Do you know that your life is 25% shorter if you smoke? Do you know that only 13% of the popu- lation smoke in the USA, but in Russia - more than 76%. 400,000 people die in Russia every year as a result of smoking. Imagine that a whole town like Ufa disappears every year. In Britain smoking is now forbidden in many public places, e. g. on the underground, on sta- tions, in shops, in theatres and in cinemas. My mother died at the age of 62. She smoked. But her sister and brother are still alive, they are in the late eighties. They never smoke. My grandfather Sergei Dmitrievich Krukov lived as long as 94. He never smoked. He always taught me: "Those who smoke are weak because if they see somebody smoking they join them. Only strong people don't follow the crowd. If you want to be a strong personality, quit smoking today if you smoke" (!atyana Klenlentyeva). , (0 " ,--==1rI' , , '\ If I try to be like him, who will be like me? (Proverb) Do ou agree with this proverb? WORDLIST addiction ['dikfn] - CKllOHHOCTb K eMY-J1&.160, nary6Ha51 npBblYKa advertising ['redv,taizi1J] - peKllaMa alcohol ['relk,hl] - anKorOllb, Cn1-1pT cope [kup] - cnpaBllTbC5I crowd [kraud] - TOJ1na excess [ik'ses] - Vl36bITOK, Vl3J1WeK harmful rha:mful] - BpeAHbli1 join [<uin] - npVlcoeAHTbC movie ['ITIu:vi] - K&.1HO, KI1HOQ:>&.1J1bM non-smoker [Inn 'smuk] - lieKYP5l1Lt&.1i1 offensive [J'fensiv] - Henpil1J1i11YHO personality Lp:sJ'nreliti] - J1YHOCTb quit [kwit] - npeKpalLtaTb tobacco [t'breku] - Ta6aK unhealthy [An'heI8i] - BpeAHbli1 (AJl 3AOPOBb) unpleasant [An'pleznt) - HenpTHbli1 I!mJD m 
3. Try to make a back translation, please. He KYPTe. aTO BblrJlAT npBJleKaTeJlbHO B CTapblX <pJlbMaX,  Ka)l(eTC, YTO Bce TaK AeJlatOT. Ho 3TO npocTo YMHa <popMa peKJlaMbl. KypeHe BpeAHO AJ1 3AOPOBb. KypeHe TalOKe HenpTHO  BpeAHO AJ1 HeKYPw.X  BJleTC cepbe3- HO yrp030 nO)l(apa. Henp11YHO KYPTb B 06w.ecTBeHHblx MeCTax: Kacpe  WK011e. Jl106a Ype3MepHa cpopMa npCTpaCT K YeMY-Jl60 Jl 3JlWe- CTBO BpeAHO A11 3AOPOBb, 6YAb TO Ta6aK, a11KOrOJlb, HapKOTK, C11aAOCT Jl AeHbr. aTO MO)l(eT BJlTbC CBAeTe11bCTBOM Hecnoc06HOCT B3pOC11eTb  cnpaB11TbC C TPYAHOCTM. 3HaeTe Jl Bbl, YTO 16 Ho6p - 3TO AeHb, KorAa JltOA BO BceM Mpe 6po- CatOT KYPTb? 3HaeTe 11 Bbl, LITO Ka>KAbl rOA 3 MJlJlOHa lIeJlOBeK YMpaIOT OT KypeH? 3HaeTe 11 Bbl, LITO Bawa )I(3Hb YKopallBaeTC Ha 25%, eCJl Bbl KYPTe? 3HaeTe Jl Bbl, LITO 11Wb 13% Hace11eH CWA KYPT, a B Pocc - 6011ee 76%? Ka>KAbl rOA B Pocc YMpaeT 400 TblClI lIeJlOBeK B pe3YJlbTaTe Kype- H. npeACTaBbTe, LITO u.e11bl ropOA, TaKO, KaK Y<t>a, ClIe3aeT Ka>KAbl rOA. B 6pTaH KypeHe 3anpew.eHO celIac BO MHorx 06w.ecTBeHHblx Mec- Tax, HanpMep B MeTpo, Ha BOK3aJlaX, B Mara3Hax, B TeaTpax  KHOTeaTpax. MOfl MaMa YMepna, Korp,a eM 6blno 62 rop,a. OHa Kypuna. A ee ceCTpa u 6paT Bce el1.le >KUBbl, 11M p,aneKO 3a 80. OHU HI1KOrp,a He KypUnl1. MOM OTeL( CepreM I1.MI1Tpl1eBl1lf KPIOKOB npO>Kl1n 11.0 94 neT. OH HI1KOrp,a He Kypl1n. OH Bcerp,a YLll1n MeHfl: liTe, KTO KYPflT, - cna6ble nlOp,I1, nOTOMY LITO, BI1p,fl KaK P,PY- rl1e KYPflT, OHI1 npl1COep,I1HflIOTCfl K HI1M. TonbKo cunbHble nlO,lJ,11 He cneAYIOT 38 TonnOM. Ecnl1 Tbl XOlfeWb 6blTb Cl1nbHOM fll1lfHOCTblO 11 eCfll1 Tbl KYPI1Wb - 6POCb KYPI1Tb cerop,Hfl >Kef" (TaTbflHa KneMeHTbeBa). EcnM II 6YAY nblTaTbCIi 6b1Tb TaKMM, KaK OH, KTO 6YAeT TaKMM, KaK II? (nOCJlOBu.a) . Listen, read and act out. ON WORDLIST be speechless ['spi:1j1is]- 3A. MOJ1yaTb caught sight ['sait] - YBLt1AeJ1 cigar [si'ga:] - cVlrapa for ever [f: 'ev] - HaBcerAa m I!mIII A bad example "The next, please, n said the nurse. The next patient, a middle-aged man, en- tered the consulting room. The doctor was. sitting behind his writing-desk and smoking. As soon as the patient caught sight of the cigar in the medical man's mouth, he turned round, and left the room without a word. The doctor was speechless for a mo- ment, then he had the man called back. "Why did you run away?" he asked in surprise. "Well, you see," said the man pointing to the cigar in the physician's hand, "how can I trust my health to a person, who doesn't take care of his own?" And with these words he left for ever.  in surprise [s'pfaiz] - c YAVlBIleHVleM nurse ['n:s] - MeAVlu.HCKaSl ceCTpa trust [tfASt]- BepVlTb, AOBepSlTb 
5. Read the rules of behavio hich merican students usually folio . Do u approve of these rules.. Make a poster with school rules. PLAYING THE GA E CLASS ULES Winning is the aim. But it is only a game. 1. Be fair. 2. Congratulate the winner. 3. Console the loser: "Well done! Next time..." 4. Don't play games in the wrong place like ra- cing in a corridor. 1. Treat others as you want to be treated. 2. Keep your hands and feet to yourself. 3. When another is talking listen with eyes and ears. 4. Walk inside. 5. Use your indoors voice. 6. We want our room to be safe and beautiful. 6 Make a poster like this. Write down your names there please. LOVE ONE ANOTUEK respect. one another Our Class Names \ --  \  4 I "\ .....  - \'-. I --'" '\ -..... , Good manners Write the ollow.ng words and phrases on a poster. Be sure ou use them while communicating with other people. HanWTe 3T CllOBa  Bblpa)l(eH51 Ha nllaKaTe  nOllb3YTecb M KaK MO)l(HO ae, 06Llta51Cb APyr C APyrOM. - Please. - May I? - Thank you. - You are welcome. - Take my seat. - Let me share. - Excuse me. - You go first. - Let me help. WORDLIST congratulate [kgn'grretju,leit] - n03ApaBJ151Tb console [kgn'sgul] - YTewaTb fair [feg] - nOpStAOYHblt1, yeCTHbli1 loser ('lu:z] - nporpaBwVli1 racing ('reisirJ]- 6er, rOHK share [Tcg] -AeJ1Tb(cS1) treat ['tri:t] - OTHOCTbCS1 (K) use indoors voice ['in'd:z] - 3A. rOBopVlTb BnOJ1rOJ1oca winning ['winilJ] - no6eAa, BblVlrpblW I!mB m 
f: S f) l..., " - ----'-  " .. '" -:'\ . ". . ) , 1__._ IlL KIN FO G DIN 55 · TES" Write the name and surname of each student in your class on a se- parate sheet of paper. Let everybody in the class rite something good about this person. Choose pape with our name and read about yoursel . Are there many good things our friends noted? The folio ing expressions will help you: Hel She is honest - ecTHblt1 always cheerful - Ao6pbl, Bece11bli1 polite - Be)l(J1Lt1Bbli1, ll106e3Hbli1 frank - Lt1CKpeHHLt1i1 clever - YMHbl not fussy - HecyeT11Lt1Bbl, cnoKoHbl well-read - HaYLt1TaHHbl always punctual - BcerAa nYHKTYaJ1bHbl hardworking - TPYA011f06l11Bbl always does what he promises - BcerAa Ael1aeT capable - cnoc06Hbl. OAapetiHbl TO, YTO o6ew.aeT has sense of humour - YYBCTBO IOMopa never lies - HLt1KOrAa He 11)1<eT sociable - 06w.lI1TeJlbHbl helpful - rOToBbli1 nOMOYb very kind and understanding - A06pbli1 Lt1 tries to be fun and optimistic - nblTaeTC 6blTb OT3bIBYLt1Bbli1, YYTKLt1t1 Bece11blM Lt1 OnTLt1MLt1CTLt1YHbIM attentive - BHlI1MaTel1bHbl. 3a60TJlll1Bbl loyal - BepHblt1, npeAaHHblt1 always careful - 3a60TJlLt1Bbl. BHLt1MaTeJlbHbl supportive - oKa3bIBalOUJ.lI1i1 no.n.o,ep)l<KY A+ 8. Assess yourself. Be honest! 1) Are you always obedient to parents, teachers? Are you careful not to gossip or talk about other people? Do you try to say something good about a person who is being talked about negatively in your presence? 2) Are you considerate to your neighbours? For example, are you careful not to be noisy late in the evening or early in the morning? Do you keep your pets from being an annoyance? Do you respect rules neighbours have for their children? 3) Is there anything you could do to make your home and yard tidy and thus make the neighbourhood more beautiful? 4) Are you always courteous? for example, do you wait for your turn in line? Do you always remember to say please and thank you? 5) Are you careful about obeying the law? For example, do you obey traffic signals even though no one else is around? Do you refrain from scattering in public places? 6) Do you always keep your word? For example, when you say you will do something. do you do it at the time you said? Do you let the proper person know if you cannot keep an appointment or fulfil an assignment? WORDLIST annoyance ['nins]- pa3APIDKeHe appointment ['pintm:;)nt] - 3A. YC1l0BlleHHa BCTpeya assignment ['sainmnt] -3aAaHe be considerate [kn'sidrit] - 6bfTb BHMa- TellbHblM by mistake [mis'teik] - no oWVl6Ke change r'tfeincB] - CAaya courteous rk:tjs] - Be)l(lll1Bbl extra ['ekstra] - 3A. llWHVI fair [f£] - cnpaBeAllVlBblti fulfil [furfil] - BblnOJ1HTb gossip ['g:)sip] - CnJ1eTH1-1yaTb negatively ['negtivIi] - OTpvll.).aTellbHO m I!1iDB \. neighbour ['neib] - coceA noisy ['nJizi] - WYMHbli1 obedient ['bi:djnt] - nOCllywHbl obey the low [I:] - 3A. He HapywaTb 3aKOH obey traffic signals ['trrefik] - 3A. c0611tOAaTb npaB/la YJ1HOrO AB)I(eH presence ['prezns] - npCyTCTBVle refrain [riJfrein] - B03Aep1-1BaTbC respect [ris'pekt] - YBa:>KaTb rule ['ru:l] - npaBJ10 scatter ['skret] - pa36pacblBaTb speak up ['spi:k]( spoke, spoken) - BbICKa3bIBaTbC tidy ['taidi] - CTblt1, onpTHbli1 
1m .#   ) 1\" 81  - - Write down as man facts from the text as you can. Don"t look into the text. Exchange papers with a par ner. Schools in America 9. Here are some letters from merican teachers. Listen and read them, please. April 18, 1996 Dear friends, I believe it is important for me to show the children the same respect that I want them to show me and each other. All of my classroom rules are based on respect for each other. Our classroom motto is "treat others as you want them to treat you." It is the Golden Rule. I believe it is also very important to understand the child. Children learn by being involved, by doing. They need to talk and interact with me and with each other. We have times of quiet listening and movement and interaction. Children need to know that the classroom is a safe place to discover and to make mistakes. They will only learn if they are willing to take a risk. They need to feel that the classroom is theirs; that they are an important element and have opportunities to make some choices. Every month we have a special motto. Here is a list of some mottos: OBEDIENCE - Doing what I am told, when I am told, with a good attitude. LOVE - Meeting another's needs unselfishly. PROMPTNESS - Being on time. Remember, only time can't be replenis- hed. FAIRNESS - Being honest and just with others. KINDNESS - Tender and gentle words and ways. GENEROSITY - Sharing what I have with a happy spirit. COURAGE - Boldness to try difficult things that are good; strength not to follow the crowd. -. Barbara Bell 10. CAenaMTe nnaKaTbl C AeBM3aMM, KOTopble BaM no Aywe, M no- BeCbTe MX B Kl1acce. WORDLIST attitude ['c.etitju:d] - OTHoweHe believe [b ill i:v] - nonaraTb, AYMaTb boldness ['bduldns] - xpa6pocTb, CMeJ10CTb courage ['kAri<tJ - MY}I(eCTBO, OTBara crowd [kraud] - TOJ1na fairness ['fEnis] - yeCTHOCTb, CnpaBeAJlBOCTb follow ['f31du] - CJ1eAOBaTb, CJ1eAVlTb, c06JlIO- AaTb gentle ['<tentl] - JlaCKOBbl honest ['3nist] - YeCTHbl interact Lintdr'rekt] - B3aVlMoAei1cTBoBaTb interaction Lintdr'rekfn] - B3aMoAecTBe involve [in'v3Iv] - 6blTb BOBJ1eyeHHbIM just [cBAst] - CnpaBeA1lBbli1 kindness ['kaindnis] - A06poTa movement [Irnu:vrndnt] -ABVI}I(eHLt1e, nepeMe- eHVle need [ni:d] - HaAo6HocTb obedience [d'bi:didns] - nOCJ1ywaHLt1e, nOBHO- BeHt.1e promptness ['pr3rn(p )tnis] - rOTOBHOCTb replenish [ri'pleniJ] - BOCnOJ1HVlTb respect [ri'spekt] - YBa}l(eHVle safe place [seif] - 6e30nacHoe MeCTO share ['fEd] - AeJ1V1TbCst, pa3AeJ1stTb spirit ['spirit] - HacTpoeHe strength [strel)8] - Ct.1J1a tender ['tendd] - He}l(Hbli1 treat [tri:t] - 06paaTbCst (c), OTHOCTbC5I (K) unselfishly [An'selfij1i] - 6ecKopblCTHO I!mID m 
m Unit 4 11. 03HaKoMbTecb, nO)l(anYMcTa, c nnaHOM WKonbl, B KOTOPOM pa60TaeT 6ap6apa 5enn, M C ee KnaccHoM KOMHaToM. CpaB- HMTe MX C BaweM wKonoM. 1 st Grade 2/3 Combo W E 1 st Grade Young 2s LIBRARY Junior High SCHOOL OFFICES KITCHEN 5 Year aids REST ROOMS 2nd Grade s REST ROOMS 3rd Grade 5th Grade 4th Grade FOYER CLASSROOM SET-UP SHEET ROOM NUMBER 116 I I t bb" blackboard u mg cabine(0 kidney table carpeting  o '0 c . TEACHER ar\?ara dL ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) en en '0 '0 ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 Q5 'E :::::I o (,) rJ) CD c :c C1:3 (,) .!: ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 NUMBER OF TABLES / DESKS U NUMBER OF CHAIRS &tit ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 .- '5 .c ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 REMARKS f\.tase st'ac.e. thrulinolLum squares dWW1 desks.  o '0 C . linoleum floor closet door I ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 ..:.:. ..:.:. rJ) rJ) Q) Q) '0 '0 4 Year aids Older 3s 7th Grade 6th Grade I blocks I calender en  r- o .c - rJ) ..:.:. o :is '-- I games I C'I c  e- C1:3 '0 (,)  co o .c .!:  "5 .c -- Q5 CD 'E'5 Q)  (,) E o door  (,) I I I 
12. 3TOT nnaKaT BMCMT Y BXOAa 8 wKony. 03HaKOMbTeCb C HMM. Bbl COrnaCHbl? ur ellness olic In order to keep all of our children as healthy as possible, we request that yc;>u do not bring them to us in the Learning Center displaying any symptoms of illness, such as Fever (03H06) Runny nose (HacMopK) or Cough (KaWeJ1b) Thank you for your understanding. r;;.ca \ f - ; c:D \ t  o .. .. .. ,  , (\ " --- 13. Listen and read. Hello children! , t My name is Virginia Brickman and I live in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. I work at the Jim Cherry Teacher Center. I am very interested in teaching children with disabi- lities, that is, children who may not be able to walk, talk, hear, see, or learn as well as you can. In my job, I show teachers and parents how to help children with disa- bilities learn. Sometimes children with disabilities can learn using special compu- ters or other learning tools. In the United States, most children with disabilities go to school along with all other children in the neighbourhood. We think that all children learn best this way. If you know a child with a disability, I hope you will try to be a friend to this student. Here is a little quiz to let you see how much you know about disabilities. Circle the correct answer: 1. All disabilities are caused by disease or sickness. True False 2. When you meet someone who is blind, you should always introduce yourself to that person. True False 3. People who can't talk are retarded or slow. True False WORDLIST circle ['s:kl] - 06BOATb disability [,dis'biliti] - HBaJ1V1AHOCTb false [f::>:ls] - J10>KHbli1, OW60Hbli1 learning tools el:nilJ 'tu:lz] - CpeACTBa 06Y"teHSI neighbourhood ['neibhud] - coceACTBO quiz [kwiz] - cepSI BonpOCOB, BKTopHa sickness ['siknis] - 60J1e3Hb slow [slu] - Heco06pa3TeJ1bHbli1 true [tru:] - sepHbli1. npaBVlllbHbli1 IJDI m 
'I KEY 1. False. Some disabilities can be caused by disease. Others are the result of accidents, genetic factors, and a number of other causes. 2. True. Introductions are always necessary when meeting new people. With young people who are blind, it is very important to explain who you are - because they cannot see you and will only know you by your voice and description. 3. False. Not always. Inability to speak may also result from damage to the throat, deafness. "How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the striving, and tolerant of both the weak and the strong because someday in life you will have been one or all of these. 11 George Washington Carver (1864-1943), an American educator, botanist and chemist, developed useful products from peanuts, sweet potatoes, and soyabeans. 14. Listen and read. My name is Joan Hensel, and I am a school secretary. I would like to tell you a little about schools in the United States. There are three types of schools: public schools, private schools, and home schools. Most students attend public schools. These schools are run by the government of a city. The citizens of the city pay taxes to pay for the school buildings, teachers' salaries and equipment and supplies for the schools. All citizens of the community must pay taxes to support the schools. Public schools are usually large. The families who want their children to attend private schools must pay tuition. Tuition payments pay for the teachers' salaries and for buildings and equipment. Private scho- ols are usually smaller than public schools. Some families choose not to send their children to school at all. They educate their children at home. I n a home school, the mother and father and children work together to WORDLIST accident ['reksidnt] - HeCyaCTHbli1 cnai1 be caused ['kJ:zd] - 6blTb Bbl3BaHHblM blind [blaind] - cneno botanist ['bJtnist] - 60TaHYlK cause [kJ:z] - npL-1YLt1Ha chemist ['kemist] - XL-1ML-1K choose [tfu:z] (chose, chosen) - BbI6V1paTb, npeAnOYTaTb citizen rsitizn] - )l(Lt1TeJ1b, rpa>K)J.aHL-1H community [k'mju:niti] - 3A. 06ecTBo compassionate [km'prefanat] - 3A. COCTpa.o.aIOIl.\VI damage ['dremicB] - nOspe>KAeHVle deafness ['defnis] - rllyxoTa depend [di'pend] - 3aBLt1CeTb description [di'skripfn] - on Lt1CaHlt1e, Lt1306pa- >KeHVle develop [di'velp] - pa3BIt1BaTb, cOBepweH- CTBosaTb disease [di'zi:z] - 60J1e3Hb educate ['edju:,keit] - AaBaTb 06pa30BaHVle, BOCnYlTblBaTb educator (.edju:'keitg] - neAaror, BOCnIt1TaTeJ1b equipment [i'k\vipmnt] - 060PYAoBaHL-1e explain [ik'splein] - 06b5lCHTb factor [frekt] - 4>aKTop genetic [cBi'netik] - reHeTYeCKVli1 home school- AOMaWH5I WKOJ1a 94 Unit 4 inability Lin'biliti] - Hecnoc06HoCTb, HeB03- MO)l(HOCTb introduction Lintr'dAkfn] - npeACTaBlleHe, 3HaKOMCTBO necessary ['nesis(  )ri] - 06513aTeJ1bHbI, Heo6xo- AViMbli1 pay taxes [pei 'treksiz] - nJ1aTVlTb Ha1l0rVl payment ['peimnt] - OnJ1aTa, nJ1aTe)K peanut ['pi:nAt] - 3eMl151Hoi1 opex, apaxlt1c private school ['praivit] - yaCTHa51 WKOlla public school ['pAblik] - 06ecTBeHHa5l, rocYAapcTBeHHa5J WKOJ1a run [rAn] (ran, run) - 3A. ynpaBlls:lTb salary ['sreIri] - >KaJ10BaHVle someday ['sAm,dei] - KorAa-HVl6YAb soyabean ['sJibi:n] - coeBbI 606 striving ['straivil)] - YCIt1J1lt1e supply [sa'plai] - 060PYAoBaHlI1e, cHa6)1(eHVle support [SlpJ:t] - nOAAep)KIt1BaTb, COAep>KaTb . tax money - AeHbrL-1, nOJ1eHHble OT c60pa HaJlOrOB tender ['tendg] - He>KHbli1, M5irKVli1 throat [erut] - rop1l0 tolerant ['t:)lrnt] - TepnVlMbl tuition [tju:'if(  )n] - 06yeHVle type ['taip] - TlI1n, 06pa3 voice [vJis] - rOJ1OC 
complete academic courses and to learn many life skills. Home schoolers believe that children learn best at home and that parents are the teachers for their own children. Students who attend public and private schools usually begin their formal education when they are six years old and continue for at least twelve years. Grades 1-5 make up the elementary school. Middle school consists of grades 6-8. High school is grades 9-12. When students have completed the 12th grad.e, they receive a high school diploma. At this point, students may end their formal education, or they may go to colle- ge. In college the student will eventually specialize in one area of study, such as mathematics, science, history, literature, theology, or foreign language. At the end of four years, he or she will earn a Bachelor degree. The student who wants to continue his or her education after college may enter graduate school and work to earn a Master's degree or a doctoral , degree. A student may also elect to enter a professional school to prepa- re to be a doctor, dentist, or lawyer. I am secretary of High School, which is a private school. My job is to work in the office and to assist the Principal, teachers and students. Our school is quite small, but we have wonderful teachers and students. Our students must study hard to learn English literature, history, mathematics, science, Spanish. Could you answer my questions, please? 1) In American schools there is much emphasis on writing. Most tests are written. How are most tests taken in your country? 2) In American education, much emphasis is placed on problem solving and discussion. There is very little emphasis on memorizing information. In your country do students memorize very much? Is there much emphasis on practical problem-solving? Is there much class discussion? 3) In the United States children are required to attend school until they are sixteen years old. Is education compulsory in your country? How many years of school are required? 4) What are some differences between schools in the United States and schools in your country? .,. :z: o " ;::: . .,. .. -  g WORDLIST area ['£ri] - 06J1aCTb, c<pepa assist ['sist] - nOMoraTb, cOJ].et1cTBoBaTb at least [li:st] - no Kpat1HeVi Mepe attend ['tend] - nocew.aTb complete [km'pli:t] - 3aKaH'H1BaTb, 3aBepwaTb compulsory [km'pAls()ri] - o63aTeJ1bHblt1 consist of [kn'sist] - COCTOTb 3 course [k:s] - KYPC dentist ['dentist] - 3y6H0i1 Bpa diploma [di'plum] - AVlnJ10M discussion [dis'kAJn] - 06ceHtlle doctoral degree ['dktrl] - J].OKTOpCKa CTeneHb earn [:n] - 3apa6aTblBaTb, 3aCJ1}')Kl1BaTb elect [i'lekt] - Bbl61t1paTb elementary school Leli'mentri] - HaanbHaSl WKOJ1a eventually [i'ventjuli] - OKOHaTeJ1bHO grade [greid] - KJ1acc hard [ha:d] -ycepAHo high school [hail - cpeAHSJs:I WKOJ1a (B AMepKe) job [Q)b] - pa60Ta lawyer ['l:>:j] - aABOKaT, IOpVlCT Master's degree [ma:stz] - CTeneHb MarVlCTpa memorize ['mem.raiz] - aanOMVlHaTb, 3aYYL1BaTb Halt13ycTb memorizing ['mem.raizilJ] - 3aY\.fIt1SaHlt1e HaVl3ycTb middle [midI] - cpeJ].HL-1i1 much emphasis is placed on - OC06bli1 aKu.eHT AeJ1aeTCSJ Ha place on - nOCTaBTb Principal ['prinspl] - J].VlpeKTOp (KOnJ1eA)Ka l1nlt1 wKonbl) receive [ri'si:v] - nOJ1yaTb require [ri'kwag] -Tpe60BaTb skill [skill - MaCTepCTBO, VlCK)'CCTBO solving ['sJlvilJ] - peWeHL-1e specialize ['speJ,laiz] - cneu.lt1an3V1pOBaTbCS1 theology [ei'lcBi] - 60rOCJ10Blt1e Unit 4 liD 
A, r. J..', 1- ;i , t'. ' -\'i' 8' _} r' et'" ...  g Schools in Britain Children in Britain start school when they are five and stay at school until they are sixteen or older. Many children in Britain attend nursery school from the age of about · three, but these schools are not compulsory. Compulsory education begins at the age of five, when children go to primary school. Primary education lasts for six years. They attend the infan't school from five to seven and then junior school until they are eleven. Then pupils go to secondary school. Children study 10 subjects: English, mathematics, science, geography, history, art, music, physical education and a foreign language. Most secon- dary schools teach French and some schools offer Spanish, German, Italian and Russian. The first three are called IIcore" subjects. Pupils take examina- tions in the core subjects at the age of 7, 11 and 14. After five years of secondary education, pupils take the General Certifi- cate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examination. Most pupils take exami- nations in all subjects. Compulsory education ends at sixteen. Some people choose to stay at secondary school for a further two years. Other people leave secondary school at sixteen and go to colleges of further education. Higher education begins at eighteen and usually lasts for three or four years. Students go to universities, polytechnics or colleges of higher educa- tion. There are now about 80 universities. Some parents choose to send their children to private schools where they pay for their education. State education is free. More than 90% of Britain's children attend state schools. 15. Complete the chart. AGE TYPE OF SCHOOL 3-5 years ............................. 5 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 5- 7 years ............................. 7 -11 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-16 years . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 16-18 years ............................. 16. Answer the questions: 1) When does compulsory education start in England? 2) How long does primary education last? 3) How long does secondary education last? 4) Which subjects do British children study at school? 5) Which foreign languages are taught in British schools? 6) Is education in Britain free? 17. Write a short description of the education system in our country WORDLIST compulsory [km'pAls(  )ri] - 06f13aTeJ1bHblii core [k:] - OCHOBHO, rJ1aSHbiti education [.edju:'keif(  )n] - 06pa30BaHe free [fri:] - 6eCnJ1aTHbiti further ['f:()] - Aa11bHetiwe infant ['infnt] - 3A. nOAroTOBTeJ1bHblti junior ['cBu:nj] - MJ1aAWti III Unit.4 nursery ['n:sri] - AeTcKt1 can physical education ['fizik(}l .edju:'keif{)n]- <p3eCKafi nOArOTOBKa primary ['praimri] - HaaJ1bHbli1 secondary ['sek{  )nd{  )ri] - cpeAHi1 stay [stei] - OCTaBaTbCfI ) 
.T. " 1 .-.,. f) ., . ,_ II{ . L U':SSI'  '.' .... '.. \, " 18. Compare the education system in Russia and in England. Schools in Russia 19. listen, read the text and say when and where the Lyceum appeared. In wha Lyceum did A. Pushkin study? Pushkin in the Lyceum Among the gardens and parks of the town Push kin we can see a light co- loured building of the lyceum. Before 1918 Pushkin was called Tsarskoe Selo. At the beginning of the 19th century the great Russian poet and writer A. Pushkin studied there. G. R. Derzhavin blessed his first steps in poetry. At Tsarskoe Selo Alexander Pushkin got acquainted with historian Karamsin, poets Zhukovsky, Batushkov, Vyazemsky and philosopher Chaadaev. The name of an educational institution - "lyceum" appeared in ancient times. One of the suburbs of the Greek town Athens was called Lykeion. The temple of Apollo was there. According to the belief of ancient people, Apollo was God of the Sun, the protector of poetry, music and art. Famous "gymnasium" was situated in the marvellous garden of the temple. The greatest philosopher of ancient times, Aristotel, taught there. The lyceum in Tsarskoe Selo was a symbol of the great traditions of the ancient school. 20. Make a back translation, please, using the wordlist. nYWKMH B nMqee CpeA caAOB  napKOB ropOAa nYWKHa MO>KHO YBAeTb CBeTlloe 3AaHe 1lu.e. Ao 1918 rOAa r. nYWKH Ha3b1BaJlC UapcKM Ce1l0M. B Hayalle XIX BeKa Be1lK PYCCKIt1 nOST It1 nlt1CaTe1lb AJ1eKCaHAP CepreeBy nYWKH YY1lCs:I 3AeCb. r. P. Aep>KaBIt1H 61larOC1l0Bll ero nepBble war B nOS3. B UapCKOM Celle nYWKH n03HaKOM1lC C CTOpKOM KapaM- 3HbIM, nOSTaMIt1 )KYKOBCKM, 6aTIOWKOBbIM. B3eMCKM  cplt1110COCPOM LfaaAaeBblM. Ha3BaHIt1e yye6HOrO 3aBeAeHIt1 - lllt1u.e£1 - B03HIt1K1l0 B rlly6oKo ApeBHOCTIt1. OAHa 3 OK- paH rpeyeCKOrO ropOAa AcpHbl HeKorAa Ha- 3blBallaCb llIt1Ke. 3AeCb CTOs:lll xpaM AnOllllOHa. no BepOB8HIt151M ApeBHlt1x, AnOIl1l0H s:lBlls:leTCs:I 60rOM C01lHl\a, nOKpOBTelleM nOS31t11t1, MY3bIK It1 It1CKYCCTBa. B npeKpaCHOM C8AY xpaMa Haxo- A1lC 3HaMeHIt1Tbl rIt1MHac. 3AeCb npeno- AaBa1l caM OCHOBaTeJ1b rMHac Be1lIt1Yaw CPIt1110COCP ApeBHOCTIt1 ApIt1CTOTe1lb. LJ,apcKo- cellbCK llu.e 6blJ1 CMBOllOM Be1lKII1X Tpa- AIt1U.It1 ApeBHe£1 WK01lbl. ...  -; WORDLIST ancient ['einJ(  )nt] - ApeBHi1 appear ['pi] - nOSlBllSlTbCSl belief [bi'li:f] - Bepa, BepoBaHVle bless ['bles] - 6J1arOCJ10BllSlTb building ['bildilJ] - 3AaHe educational institution [.edju:'keifnI .insti'tju:f(  )n] - ye6Hoe 3aBeAeHLt1e get acquainted with [get a'kweintid wiO]- n03HaKOMTbCSl C 4 KHl-ira AmI 4TeHi-iSl K Y4e6Hl-iKY «C4aCTI1. aHrl1.-2».  historian [his't:):rin] - CTOpK light [lait] - CBeTJ1bl lyceum [lai'si:m] - J1u.e marvellous ['mo:vlas] - BOcXTTellbHbl. npeKpac- Hbl protector [pr'tekt] - 3aL1U1THK. nOKpOBLt1TeJ1b suburb ['SAb:b] - OKpaHa. npi'1rOpOA temple ['tempI] - xpaM Unit 4 97 
98 I!mI 21 . Compare your timetable with the timetable of the Lyceum THE TIETABLE - getting up, prayer (MOI1L1TBa) in the hall - lectures - tea with \.AJhite bread - the first walk - lectures - the second walk - the dinner (three courses) (a Tpex 6I1IOA) - drawing or calligraphy (cToncaHe) - lectures -tea - the third walk - individual studies - supper (two courses) - the rest and amusements (paaBI1eeHSI) ("ball and race") - the evening prayer, going to bed 6hrs 7-9hrs 9hrs till 10hrs 10-12 12-13 13 14-15 15-17 17 till 18 18-20 20:30 till 22 22 Per week 8hrs - for the French language 8hrs - for the German language 6hrs - for the Latin language 6hrs - for the Russian language 3hrs - each - history, geography, mathematics 1 hr - each - for Logic, civil law, Theology (aaKoH 60)f(t1) 22. Translate the following text, please. Here is a certificate of A. S. Pushkin: The student of the Lyceum of Tsarskoe Selo Pushkin Alexander stu- died here for six years and had good results in the following subjects: Theology and Logic and Ethical Philosophy, Private, Public and Russian criminal and civil law - Good; Latin and Political economy and Finances - Fairly Good; Russian and French Literature and Fencing - Excellent. Besides he studied History, Geography, Statistics, Mathematics and the German language which was confirmed by this certificate. Tsarskoe Selo, 9 June of 1817. 23. Write a letter to a pen friend in an English-speaking country. Describe your school and the subjects you study. Write about foreign languages you lea'rn. Good luck! 
JUST FOR FUN The lighter side of school life 2 . Listen, read and act out, please. Popular Words Teacher Which words do the pupils use most often at school? Pupil I do not know... ;; Teacher Quite right. Never too late to learn Mother What are you doing, Dick? Dick I'm reading a very interesting book. Mother But what about your lessons? It's already late. Dick But don't you know that it is never too late to learn? *** "Johnny, why are you late for school every morning?" "Every time I come to the corner a sign says, "School - Go slow. It Joint Efforts "Did the teacher notice that I helped you with your composition?" "I think so, Dad. He said it was quite impossible for me to make so many mistakes myself." Misplaced Zeal Roy's school report was rather bad. His mother said: "I promised to buy you a bicycle if you learned better. What were you doing last term?" "I was learning to ride a bicycle." Not Her Fault Aunt Was Becky successful in her history examination? Mother Not very, but I don't think it was her fault. They asked her things that happened before she was born. Heat and Cold Teacher What are the effects of heat and cold? Pupil Heat expands and cold contracts. Teacher Quite right; can you give an example? Pupil Yes, sir. In summer, when it is hot, the days are longer, but in winter, when it is cold, the days are shorter. WORDLIST composition Lkmp'zifn] - CO\fVlHeHe contract [knt'rrekt] - C>K1t1MaTb effect [i'fekt] - BJ1S1H1t1e. CJ1eACTBe expand [ik'sprend] - paCWLt1pS1Tb fault [f:lt] - BHa heat [hi:t] - >Kapa, 3H0i1 impossible [im'psbl] - HeB03MO>KHbI joint efforts [ct3int 'efts] - COBMeCTHbie YCWl1t1S1 misplaced zeal ['mis'pleist zi:l] - HeYMecTHoe ycepA1t1e notice ['nutis] - 3aMeyaTb promise ['prmis] - 06ew,aTb sign [sain] - 3HaK successful [sk'sesful] - YAa\fHbl term [t:m] - ceMecTp, YeTBepTb use [ju:z] - ynoTpe6J1S1Tb Unit 4 99 
L E 15 25. Listen and read. Einstein for a Day Albert Einstein is one of the world's most brilliant and respected scientists. He is known for formulating the theory of relativity, which played a criticaJ role in the development of atomic energy. Einstein had a fine sense of,.humbur. There's an amusing story about how Einstein was traveling to universities in a chauffeured car, giving lectures on relativity. One day the chauffeur said. "Dr. Einstein, I've heard this lecture about 30 times. I know it by heart, and I bet I could give it myself. tJ "Well, I'll give you the chance," said Einstein. "They won't recognize me at the school. When we get there I'll put on your cap, and you introduce yourself as me and give the lecture. 'J The chauffeur gave Einstein's lecture without a single mistake. When he finished, he started to leave, but one of the professors stopped him to ask a complex question. The chauffeur thought fast. "That problem is so simple," he said, "It's a surprise that you're asking. In fact, to show you how simple it is, I'm going to ask my chauffeur to come up here and answer your question."  li.J, . . , -  (\ t\ .  , " - .' , $1 J:' I 26. ct out d dialogue between Einstein and his chauffeur 7. Explain the following phrase: 'M chauffeur will answer your question. " 28. Learn by heart any 3 lines from the te t, write them down then check yourself WORDLIST amusing ['mju:ziI)] - 3a6aBHbI bet [bet] - Aep)t(aTb nap brilliant ['briljnt] - 6J1eCT chance [tfa:ns) - waHC chauffeur ['f uf] - wocpep chauffeured car - MaWHa. KOTOPYIO BeJ1 w04>ep complex ['k:>mpleks] - CJ10)t(Hbli1 development [di'velpmnt] - pa3BTVle energy ['encBi] - 3Hepr II!E I!lmD recognize ['rekgnaiz] - Y3HaBaTb respect [ris'pekt] - YBIDKaTb scientist ['saintist] - yyeHblt1 sense of humour [sens:>v 'hju:m) -YyBCTBO IOMopa single [siI)gl] - eAHcTBeHHbI theory of relativity ['eiri :)v .rel'tiviti] - TeopVl OTHOCVlTeJ1bHOCT 
 -.- gPl 29. Listen and read. The Dragonfly and the Bee The Bee and Dragonfly went to school in the forest. Although they sat at the same desk, they were not friends. Even in break they played separately. One day the Bee caught a cold and didn't come to school. "It's nothing much," they said in class. lilt doesn't matter if she misses a day or two. The Bee always gets good marks and she will catch up." So children insects said they were sorry their friend was ill, and that was that. Only Dragonfly couldn't stop worrying. She sat there looking very mise- rable, rubbing her eyes, and then began to cry. uOh, oh," she wept. "If only little Bee could get well again quickly. How shall I get on without her?" "Just look!" the Mosquito exclaimed. "Who would have thought that gig- gling Dragonfly could be such good friends with anybody?" And nobody knew what a good reason the Dragonfly had for crying. She used to copy her homework from the Bee. 30.Making questions. Chan e the following sentence into questi- ons: The Bee went to school in the forest. 1) What? 4) or 2) Who? 5) ..., didn't she? 3) Yesl no 31. Answer the following questions: 1) What school did the Bee and the Dragonfly go to? 2) Who went to school in the forest? 3) Did they go to school in the forest or in the field? 4) They went to school in the forest, didn't they? 5) Did they sit at the same desk? 6) Were the Bee and the Dragonfly good friends? 7) Did they play in breaks together or separately? 8) Who caught a cold one day? 9) What did the children insects say? 10) Why did they not worry about her? 11) Who could not stop worrying? 12) What did the Dragonfly say weeping? 13) Why was the Mosquito so very much surprised? 14) Did the Dragonfly have a good reason for crying? 15) What reason for crying did the Dragonfly have? WORDLIST a good reason [gud 'ri:zn] - BeCKaSl np'4Ha although [:rou] - XOTSI be good friends with [gud 'frend] -APY>KTb C break [breik] - nepeMeHa catch cold ['kretf 'kuld] - npoctyAL-1TbCSI catch up (with) - AorOHS1Tb copy ['kpi] - cnCblBaTb dragonfly ['drregnflai] - cTpeKo3a exclaim [iks'kleim] - BOCK11KHyrb get on without [get wi'oaut] - 06XOATbCSl 6e3 giggle ['gigl] - XXKaTb go to school- Y'U1TbCS1 B WKOJ1e It's noting much / It doesn't matter.- 3To HeBa)KHO. HeCTpaWHO. miserable ['miz(  )r(  }bl] - >KaJ1 KL-1 £1 , HeC'4aCT- Hblt1 miss [mis] - nponycKaTb (YPOK) mosquito [ms'ki:tu] - KOMap rub [rAb] -TepeTb separately ['sepritli] - OTAel1bHO she couldn't stop worrying ['wAriJ)] - HKaK He MOrJ1a ycnoKoTbCSI weep [wi:p] (wept, wept) - nJ1aKaTb who would have thought - KTO 6b1 Mor nOAYMaTb Unit 4 1m) 
1m Unit 4 32. Fill in the blanks with preposi ions or adverbs: The Dragonfly and the Bee The Bee and Dragonfly went ... school ... the forest. Although they sat ... the same desk, they were not friends. Even ... break they played ... One day the Bee caught a cold and didn't come ... school. "It's nothing much," they said ... class. "It doesn't matter if she misses a day or two. The Bee always gets good marks and she will catch up." So the children insects said they were sorry their friend was ill, and that was that. Only Dragonfly couldn't stop worrying. She sat there looking very mise- rable, rubbing her eyes, and then began to cry. "Oh, oh," she wept. "If only little Bee could get well again... How shaUl get ... without her?" "Just look!" the Mosquito exclaimed. "Who would have thought that gig- gling Dragonfly could be such good friends ... anybody?" And nobody knew what a good reason the Dragonfly had for crying. She used to copy her homework ... the Bee. 3. Retell the story using the following words and phrases: to go to school; to catch a cold; it's nothing much; to miss a day or two; to get good marks; to catch up with; that was that; couldn't stop worrying; to look miserable; to rub one's eyes; to get well; to get on without; who would have thought; to be good friends with; to have a good reason for; to copy from. 34. Topics for discussion: 1 ) Who is your favourite character in this story? Why? 2) Did you like the Dragonfly? What do you think of her? 3) Do you know anybody whom the Dragonfly reminds you of? If so, describe the person. 4) Speak on friendship. 5) Suppose the Dragonfly liked the Bee! 35. Write a letter to the children insects on behalf of the Bee (OT n 14a n'lenbl). Explain why you missed cl sses. Answer the I tte . 'Dear "oys and irLsf 36. Write a new ending for this story. .J7. Listen and read. A Lesson By Jerome K. Jerome 1) I remember a hot afternoon at school. The class was for English literatu- re, and the lesson began with the reading of a poem. The reading finished, we closed our books, and the Professor, a white-haired old gentleman, kindly, suggested our telling in our own words what we had just read. "Tell me," said the Professor, encouragingly, "what it is all about?" 2) "Please, sir," said the first boy - "it is about a maiden." "Yes," agreed the Professor; "but I want you to tell me in your own words. 
We do not speak of a maiden, you know; we say a girl. Yes, it is about a girl. Go on." "A girl," repeated the boy, embarrassed, uwho lived in a wood." "What sort of a wood?" asked the Professor. The boy examined his inkpot carefully, and then looked at the ceiling. "Come," the Professor, grew impatient, "you have been reading about this wood for the last ten minutes. Surely you can tell me something about .t " I . 3) "Please, sir, it was the usual sort of a wood," said the boy. UTell him what sort of wood," said the Professor, pointing to the second lad. The second boy said it was a Ugreen wood". This annoyed the Professor still n1ore; he called the second boy a blockhead, though really I cannot see why, and passed on to the third who, for the last minute, had been sitting apparently on hot plates with his right arm waving up and down like a se- maphore signal. 4) "A dark and gloomy wood," shouted the third boy, with much relief to his feelings. "A dark and gloomy wood," repeated the Professor with approval. "And why was it dark and gloomy?" The third boy was still equal to the occasion. "Because the sun could not get inside it." The Professor felt he had discovered the poet of the class. "Because the sun could not get into it, or, better, because the sunbeams could not penetrate. And why couldn't the sunbeams penetrate there?" uPlease, sir, because the leaves were too thick." 5) "Very well," said the Professor, "the girl lived in a dark and gloomy wood. Now what grew in this wood?" he pointed to the fourth boy. "Please, sir, trees, sir." "And what else?" "Toadstools, sir." This after a pause. The Professor was not quite sure about the toadstools, but on referring to the text, he found that the boy was right: toadstools had been mentioned. 6) "Quite right," said the Professor, "toadstools grew there. And what else? What do you find under the trees in a wood?" "Please, sir, earth, sir." WORDLIST annoy ['ni] - pa3Apa)l(aTb apparently ['prerntli] - nO-BAMOMY approval ['pru:vl] - oA06peHe besides [bi'saidz] - KpoMe be sure uu] - 6blTb YBepeHHblM blockhead ['b13khed] - 60J1BaH bush [bun - KYCTapHVlK discover [di'skA V] - Y3HaBaTb, OTKpblTb embarrassed [im'brerst] - cMyw.eHHbli1 encouragingly [in'kAricBiDli] - nOA6a.o.pBa51 equal ei:kwl] - paBHbli1 equal to the occasion - Ha BbiCOTe n0J10)l(eH51 exanline [ig'zremin] - paCCMaTpLt1BaTb feeling efi:liIJ] -l.tYBCTBO, ow.yw.eHe gloomy ['glu:lni] - Mpal.tHbli1, yrplOMbli1 impatient [im'peiJnt] - HeTepneJ1Bbli1 in own words - CBOLt1M CJ10BaM inkpot ['iDkpt] -l.tepHLt1J1bHu.a lad [Ired] - napeHb, IOHowa maiden [meidn] - AeBywKa mention ['menJn] -ynOMif1HaTb occasion ['kei3n] - OCHOBaHe, 06b5lCHeHi-1e on hot plates - 3A. KaK Ha yrJ1S1X penetrate epeni,treit] - npOHKaTb, npOXOALt1Tb CKB03b point ['pint] - YKa3b1BaTb refer (to) [rrf:] - 06paLltaTbCSI (K) relief [ri'li:f] - 06J1ereHe sunbeam ['sAnbi:m] - COJ1HeHbli1 J1Yl.t surely [Tuli] - HeCOMHeHHO, HeBepHSlKa toadstool ['tudstu:I] - noraHKa wave [weiv] - pa3MaXBaTb white-haired ['wait ,h£d] - CeAOBJ1aCbli1 I!mID lEE] 
"No, no; what grows in a wood besides trees?" "Oh, please, sir, bushes, sir." - "Bushes; very good. Now, we are getting on. In this wood there were tre- es and bushes. And what else?" "Please, sir, there was a torrent there." "Quite right; and what did the torrent do?" "Please, sir, it gurgled." "No, no. Streams gurgle, torrents..." "Roar, sir. II "It roared. And what made it roar?" 7) This was a poser. One boy - he was not our prize intellect, I admit- suggested the girl. To help us the Professor put his question in another form: "When did it roar?" One of the boys explained that it roared when it fell down among the rocks, and the Professor agreed with it. "And what lived in this wood besides the girl?" was the next question. "Please . sir, birds, sir." "Yes, birds lived in this wood. What else?" 8) Birds seemed to have exhausted our ideas. "Come," said the Professor, "what are animals with tails, that run up trees?" We thought for a while, then one of us suggested cats. This was an error; the poet had said nothing about cats; squirrels was what the Professor was trying to get. That is all I remember of this lesson on literature. 38. Translate into Russian the first paragraph in the written fo m. 39 Learn by heart an 4 lines from the text. You'd btter do it in the evening. Write these lines down in the morning, not looking into the text. Then check yourself. 1Ift s- g 40. Answer the questions, please. Knowledge: 1 ) Who are the main characters in this story? 2) Where is the scene of the story set? 3) What did the professor look like? 4) How does the story end? What are the final words of the author? Analysis: 1 ) Compare the lesson in this story with the lessons of literature at your school. How are they alike? How are they different? 2) Why, do you think, are the children in the story poor in answering the Professor's questions? WORDLIST error ['er] - ow6Ka exhaust [ig'Z:st] - CYepnblBaTb explain [ik'splein] - 06bSlCHs:lTb for a while [wail] - HeKoTopoe BpeMs:I gurgle ['g:gl] - 6YJ1bKaTb poser ['puz] - TPYAHblt1 Bonpoc prize intellect ['praiz 'intilekt] - OAapeHHblVi YMOM roar [r:] - peBeTb, wYMeTb. rpoxoTaTb rock [rk] - KaMeHb. CKaJ1a squirrel ['skwirl] - 6eJ1Ka stream [stri:m] - Pye£1 tail ['te it] - XBOCT torrent ['trnt] - cTpeMTeJ1bHbl nOTOK EImDII 
IPLlt 41. Act out the story. Good luck! 42. Talk about your own school in groups. Discuss: 1 ) Are you happy with your school? 2) What things are good about it? 3) What things are bad? Does your school offer good facHities for sport. clubs, excursions, etc.? 4) Talk about your ideal school. 43. Sasha imagined the ideal school and described a typical day there. This is what he wrote. Read it and write an essay descri- bing a typical day in your ideal school A typical day at my ideal school A typical day at my ideal school. I get up at nine o'clock. I have a cup of orange or carrot juice. We have three lessons a day on one subject. The first lesson is English Grammar. We play different Grammar Games. While we are playing the games, the teacher comes to see us from time to time and helps us with our work. We are listening to music while we are having our lesson. Then we go to the computer room and do some research and tests. We work there till twelve which is lunchtime. I have lunch in our schools' cafe. The afternoon lesson begins at two o'clock and lasts till three o'clock. Then we go to the library. We prepare small plays and act them out. Sometimes we go on an excursion or have class discussions. There are excellent facilities at our school. There is an indoor swirnming pool, a sports centre, tennis courts and a theatre workshop. When I come home I have about an hour's homework to do. Usually 'l-le write essays. We have no marks in school. Our teacher assesses us with the following words: "excellent", "very good", "improving", "neat work", "do over", "incomple- te", "see me", "not satisfactory", "spelling errors", "watch punctuation". .' 44. In groups. Discuss your ideal school. Think about these things: 1 ) The number of lessons. 2) The number of subjects to study. 3) The number of students in a class. 4) The time that lessons begin and end. 5} The number of days at school per week. 6) The structure of the lessons (\vith a teacher or self-study). 7) The facilities for students (cafe, dining room, sports facilities). 8) The amount of homework. I KEY  nOMHIO OAH >KapK AeHb B WKOJle. 6blJl YPOK aHrJlL-1CKO JlTepaTYPbl, OH HaaJ1C5I c '-ITeHiI151 CTVlxoTBOpeHVl5I. KorAa Mbl 3aKOHL-11l ljTaTb VI 3aKpblll KHrL-1, npo$eccop, CeAOBJlaCbl A>KeHTJlbMeH n04TeHHoro BoapacTa, 11106e3- HO npeAJ10)f(111 HaM pacCKa3aTb CBOMt-1 CJlOBaML-1, 0 ljeM Mbl TOJlbKO '-ITO npo- '-ITaJl . "CKa,)((L-1Te MHe,- np0L-13HeC npocpeccop 60APblM rOl1ocoA,- 0 eM 3Aec rOBOpVlTCs:l?" WORDLIST amount [Imaunt] - KOJ1Lt1yeCTBO ideal [ai'dil] - Aeal1bHbli:1 I!ImD 1m 
Aoporlt1e APY3b5l! Mbl XOTlt1M, lfT06bl Bbl HaYlflt111lt1Cb Oplt1eH- Tlt1pOBaTbCS1 B CBoeM ropOAe lt1 He3HaKO- MOM, B CBoe CTpaHe L.1 lJY)I(O. npeAllaraeM SaM npaSlt111at KOTopble CAellaT Bawe npe6BaHlt1e Ha Yllue 6e30naCHM. 3HaHe lt1X AaCT S03MO- HOCTb saM caMM lt136e)l(aTb 3aTpYAH- TellbHblX Clt1Tyau.lt1 lt1 nOM04b TeM, KTO 8 Hlt1X nonall. )t(ellaeM ycnex.a! 
OLITENESS "When in Rome, do as the Romans do. 11 English saying Good manners .. .Well, you can be polite. Good manners include saying uplease" whenever you ask for anything and "thank you" when anybody does anything for you. Good manners include: NOT spitting in public. NOT walking round in crowds forcing people off the pavement. NOT dropping your empty crisp and sweet packets in the street. Not making a lot of noise in public, especially at night when other people are sleeping. Most English of customs is QUEUING. Queuing, means standing in a single line and waiting your turn. It is done at bus stops, in shops, at the cinema and at taxi ranks. Queuing is a great English tradition. It also helps if you show the driver your pass without waiting to be asked (or offer him your fare, preferably in coins not notes), sit rather than stand, but offer your seat if the bus is full to any old people or pregnant women left stan- ding - not that every young local person does! If you are going to use buses often, it is worth buying a bus pass which will allow you to travel as often as you like !ithout further payment. You are less likely to upset a crowd of Eng lish people by tearing all your clothes off and jumping up and down on their national flag (they would pretend not to notice), than by pushing in front in a queue.  c-   i\ 1- . " . ) .: ( I 11'.- '- i -  ''-.' . , . ). : ,.  ., ". .,:: . I ! .... / I ...l' \ . .. .  .. .. . ..\,1 ,-'J  :1 ( \ 1 I. ------ , \ ')  , :r' Th '. . '. '- '-. o --?l oO . _.' ",'. o J\: D" ---'  V ..,.X\    . ( k o - , . "I. -' ' -j ...4 . - 1-; ...... .." J  I. . 'I , ....... " . , ". "'"_ _ . _ .1_ .. ". -r ....-. - , . - . : -.  ";1'.: : . '. I . ,. . .. .- . . . - WORDLIST empty ['empti] - nycTo force [f:s] - 3A. CTaJlKBaTb noise ['niz] - WYM queuing ['kju:ilJ] - CT05lTb B OlfepeALt1 spit [spit] (spat, spat) - nJleBaTb tear [t£] (tore, torn) - 3A. cpblsaTb upset [Ap'set] -oroplfaTb I!1mD 1m 
Signs 1. How many signs do you know? On the street B&B 1. Bed&breakfast KEEP , , CLEAR. 2. 7. 8. No cars In the bus NOTICE HELP KEEP THIS PLACE CLEAN 5. CAUTION Beware of dogs 6. --........., '\ \ 1\ \ \ '-, /' '------' 12. Shared pedal cycle and pedestrian route QUEUE PAY NO EXACT REQUEST THIS SIDE HERE STANDING FARE ONLY BUS STOP . . 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Bus stop 18. Request bus stop At the metro station ,.;;;;:;. ANGE  PLEASE CAUTION CAUTION UNDERGROUND SHOW PULL MIND MIND MIND TICKETS YOUR HEAD YOUR STEP THE GAP 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. In the train TIMET ABLE 25. Toilet and washroom 30. m11!Jm11 ... Pena ty £50 26. No smoking Vacant 31. CAUTION LOOK BOTH WAY CAUTION WET PAINT 3. 4. DON'T WALK 9. NO PARKING 10. 11. Do not lean out of the window when the train is moving 27. Engaged Press lever to flush 32. 33. This door opens outwards 28. Litter and paper towels 34. Do not open whilst train is moving 29. Please close the door on leaving 35. 
In the airport r 1 r 1 6 36. Flight departures 37. Flight arrivals 38. No trolleys I  711 I mmm -- 42. Passport control 43. Customs 44. Airbus Time TRAIN FROM SPECIAL ANNOUNCE- MENT ARRIVAL 48. 49. 50. I KFY 1 - CACleTC KOMHaTa (HOLJJ1er Lt1aaBTpaK) 2 - He 3arOpIDKVlBai1Te 3 - CMOTpTe B 06e CTOpOHbl 4- OCTOpO>KHO, oKpaweHo 5 - He COpVlTb 6 - OCTOpO>KHO, c06aK1I1 7 - OCTOpO>KHO, AeTL 8 - npoe3A MaWLt1HaM 3anpelll.eH 9 - cToi1Te 10 - napK08Ka aanpetlJ.eHa 11 - YCTYnLtITe AOpory 12 - A/l BellOCVlneAt-1CTOB 111 neweXOAOB 13 - BCTaBaTb B OLJepeAb B sTY CTOPOHY 14- nllaTTb 3AeCb 15 - CTOOTb 3anpeu.taeTC 16 - 6e3 CAClYH 17 - 06f13aTellbHasl aBT06ycHa51 OCTaHOBKa 18 - OCTaHOBKa no Tpe60BaHfO 19- MeTpo 20 - nO>KaJ1yfi1cTa, nOKIDKVlTe 6V1J1eT 21- Kce6e 22 - OCTOpO)KHO, 6eperTe r0J10BY 23 - OCTOpO>KHO, CTYneHbKVI 24- OCTOpo>KHO, Me>KAY nIlaT<PoPMOi1 Lt1 nQe3AOM - w,eJ1b 25 - paCnCaHLt1e 26 - He KYPHTb - wTpa4> 50 4>YHTOB 27 - He BbiCOBblBai1Tecb Lt13 OKHa, nOKa noe3A HaxOAffi- CfI B ,lJ.BL-1)I(eH 28 - STa ,lJ.Bepb oTKpblBaeTc CHapY>K 29 - He OTKpblBaTb BO BpeM5I AB>KeHfI nOe3Aa 30 - TYaneT 111 YMbIBanbHK 39. Meeting point 40. Entrance 41. Exit T £ XI SHORT TERM r '\ CAR . . PARK . . 45. 46. 47. TIME DUE PLAT LATE 51. 52. 53. 31 - cBo60AHO 32 - aaHSITO 33 - Ha>KMVlTe pblyar A/lfl CMblBa 34 - AJl Mycopa  CnOJlb30BaHHblX 6YMa>KHblX no- J10TeHeu. 35 - nO)KaJlycTa, yxo, 3aKpoTe ABepb 36 - OTJleT 37 - npVlJ1eT 38 - TeJ1e>KK1I1 aanpew,eHbI 39 - MeCTO BCTpeyVI 40 - BXO,lJ. 41 - BbIXO,lJ. 42 - nacnopTHbli1 KOHTpOJ1b 43 - TaMO)J(Hfi 44 - aBT06yc A/lfl aBanaCCIDKVlpOB 45 - TaKC 46 - noe3,Qa Ha nOHAOH 47 - KpaTKoBpeMeHHas1 CTOHKa MaWVlH 48 - np6b1Te 49 - oc06ble coo6w,eH51 50 - noe3,lJ. a 51 - nnaT4>opMa 52 - no pacncaHVlIO 53 - On03.QaH1I1e Give yourself a score: 53-48 - Excellent! 47-42 -Good job! Less than 37 - Try again. Good luck! I!liUD IDE 
Social customs Things you need to know Things to have away from home In England and America when you leave home you should always have identification, which includes your name, address, telephone number, blood type, and inforrl1ation about any special medical problems you have. 2. 3anonHMTe KapTO'lKY: Identification Card Person's name Age Birthday Address T stephona Number Blood Type Other Present medical problems and chronic conditions: Allergies (to drugs, insect bites, etc.): When you are away from home, you should always have enough money with you to make a telephone call home or to someone else who can help you. Here are some of the numbers your list should include: dad (at work), mum (at work), friend or neighbour to contact if mum or dad can't be reached, doctor, police, fire. When you call someone to ask for help, it is important that you give them a message they can understand and remember. Here are some examples of short information: I am calling about an emergency: - a girl who fell off her bike and might have broken an arm. - a fire in the house. You should give the message according to the plan: This is (your name) I am calling about an emergency (describe the emergency) at (house address, name of street) The nearest cross road is ... The telephone number here is (phone number) WORDLIST according to ['k:diIJ] - B COOTBeTCTBVll-1, cor naCHO allergy ['rel<t5i] - anJ1epr be away from home - YXOALt1Tb Lt13 AOMa blood type ['bIAd 'taip] - rpynna KpOBi1 chronic conditions ['krnik kn'difnz] - XPOHl-1- L.leCKl-1e 3a60J1eBaHI-1 cross road [krs] - nepeKpeCTOK describe [dis'kraib] - OnLt1CblBaTb drug [ drAg] - neKapcTBo emergency [i'rn:<Bnsi] -3KCTpeHHbI cJ1yYai1 fall off [f:l] (fell, fallen) - nClAaTb C L.lero-J1i160 identification [ai,dentifi'keifn] - YAOCTOBepeHVle J1Lt1YHOCTVI insect bites ['insekt 'baits] - YKYCbl HaceKOMbiX special medical problems ['spefJI'rnedikl 'prJblJrnz] - MeAVlu.I-1HCKl-1e OTKJ10HeHI-1S1 om IJmID 
Fire Ambulance Police C006Ll.\aTe 06 3KCTpeHHbiX cl1yaS1x no TellecpoHaM: Russia U.K. USA 01 999 911 03 999 911 02 999 911 3.npOMTaMTe, no.anYMcTa, M cAenaMTe nnaKaT, ecnM B cornaCHbl c npeAOCTepe)KeHMRMM. , Safety in the city - Never take lifts from strangers. - Do not stay out very late, and do not walk home on your own. If so, walk along the centre of the path on well-lit streets if possible. - Avoid empty underground platforms. Stay close to the exit if you find yourself on a deserted platform. - Never carry your address and keys in the same bag; your house could be the next target of a thief. - If you are threatened, give up your handbag rather than risk injury. - If you see someone who has been or is being attacked, don't offer help, you may be attacked yourself, telephone the police. REMEMBER: Traffic drives on the "wrong" side here. So look LEFT before you cross the road. And a RED FLAG on the beach means don't swim in the water - it's dangerous. \ 'It .' \\\\  .\ "\ \ ,  Manners A good manners Quiz 4. 'iTO Bbl Bbl6epeTe? You are on a bus. After you take the last seat, an elderly woman gets on the bus. You should: a) get up and offer her your seat, b) hide your face in a magazine or newspaper, c) let her stand because she'll soon find a seat, d) rationalize by thinking, "First come, first served." I KEY a) WORDLIST attack ['trek] - HanaAaTb close [kl  us] - pSJAOM deserted [di'zg:tid] - 3A. 6e3J1IOAHbli1 elderly ('eldli] - nO)f(VlJ1oi1 empty ('empti] - nycToi1 First come, first served. - 3A. KTO snepeA, Toro lfepeA. give up [giv] -3A. OTAaTb if so - eCJ1Lt1 TaKoe CJlYLt1J10Cb injury ('inc3gri] - YBelfbe offer ['f] - npeAJlaraTb on your own [un] - 3A. OALt1H path [pa: e] - Aopora possible ['psbl] - B03MO)f(Hbli1 rationalize ('rrefnlaiz] - paccY'f(AaTb safety ['seifti] - Mepbl 6e30nacHocT stay out [ste i] - 3A. 3a.nep)f(l1BaTbcSJ stranger ['strein<t] - He3HaKOMeu take a lift [teik  lift] - npOCl1Tb nOABe3Tl1 target ['ta:git] - MLt1WeHb thief [ei:f] - BOp threaten ['8retn] - yrpO)f(aTb well-lit [wel'lit] - xopowo OCBeLlteHHbli1 I!mID lID 
5. npO'fMTaMTe, nO>KanYMcTa, nMCbMO KOpMH Wapn, aApecoBaH- , Hoe 8aM. Hello - my nama is Corinne Sharpe and I work with the British tourist authority - in London where I live. I have visited Russia many times and hope that one day you will visit Great Britain, for a holiday or to study English. We have many interesting places to see -lovely scenery, mountains, lakes and small villages. There are also many different customs in Scotland, Wales and England. Please come and visit us one day, you will be very welcome. When you visit London, the best way to get around is the Londoners' way- by public transport. Central London and the suburbs are well served by both the bus and Underground networks. Londoners call their Underground train network the tube. It's a fast, conve- nient and very easy way to travel. London underground 1. The city of London, England, grew rapidiy in the 1800s. The streets of the city could not hold all the traffic. A '!oung South African named Henry Gre- athead had a very simple idea. Why not uild tunnels below the streets? Then trains could carry people through them. 2. Henry Greathead talked about subvays for 20 years. But people who owned land in London said that they owned the streets as well as all the land under the streets. The landowners wanted to be paid for the use of this land. Then the Subway Act of 1884 was passed. This law declared that the streets and the land under them vere public property. They belonged to everyone. At last, Henry Greathead could build his subway tunnels. 3. Henry made working underground safer by using new ways to construct his tunnels. He also invented special tools for the job. Henry built two tubes, one on top of the other. Inside the tubes, electric engines pulled five-car trains. They could carry 160 passengers at 25 miles an hour. By 1890 the trains ran every three mi- nutes. The subway was a great success. Soon, other large cities of the world built subways. Henry's ideas were used in Paris, Boston and New York, but he never saw them. Henry Greathead died in 1895. The Buses Londoners are proud of their "big red bu- ses. " These days some may not be red, but you 'Nill always be able to recognize them. + 0 , ,,., +.,. ,.A . !" _" ...  t: . .. o...t-.." - F"? -; . \  . ----- I ' l . -----., -- - .,.. -. &. .....4  ....;;;..; ): \ -; .",.- ,. . f; f ...... . , .. .... .... ...... 4'''';;' : 1xI . I . ' .,.. '1 . . 1(.  1: . . \0.  ,) Double-decker sightseeing bus WORDLIST as well as - TaK)Ke ... KaK be a great success - MeTb 60J1bW0i1 ycnex be proud of [praud] - rOPATbC51 convenient [kn'vi:njnt] -YA06Hbli1 cover [lkA v] - OXBaTblBaTb landowner ['lrend,Jun] - 3eMJ1eBJ1aJ].eJ1eu one-journey ticket [,ct3:ni 'tikit] - 6J1eT Ha OAHY noe3AKY own [un] - BJ1(iAeTb lIB I!mID .. 1 pass [pa: s] - npOXOATb rapidly ('rrepidli] - CTpeMTeJ1bHO recognize ['rekgnaiz] - Y3HaaaTb subway ['sAb,wei] - l)'HHeJ1b Subway Act of 1884 - AOKYMeHT 0 MeTpo 1884 r. tool [tu:l] - VlHcTPYMeHT traffic ['trrefik] - AB VI)I(eH Vie , TpaHcnopT tube [tju:b] - MeTpo underground ['Andgraund] - "nOA3eMKa" 
Buying your Ticket There are four kinds of tickets: one-journey bus tickets (sold on the bus); weekly bus passes covering all of the zones; single or return tube tickets (sold at the tube station where you start your journey); and Travelcards. Prices vary according to distance and the number of zones you pass through. Make sure you keep your ticket until your journey is completed - inspec- . tors often check them. Travelcards You will find Travelcards very convenient for your trips around London. They give the freedom of London Transport buses and tubes. Travelcards are excellent value, saving you time and money. Travelcards can be bought for 1 day or 7 days. Ticket gates To enter the Utube" system in central London you simply put your ticket magnetic strip down in the slot on the right side of the gate you want to use. The gate will open when you remove your ticket. Leave the station in the same way - your ticket will be automatically returned to you if it is valid for another journey. Phones Telephone calls in the UK are expensive. There are no free local calls. f you want to use the phone in your host family's home, ask them first and offer t(} pay for the cost of the call. You r n make calls from public telephone boxes, which are either red (tra- ditional) Jr silver (modern). Some take green Phonecards, which you can buy from the Tourist Information Centre, Post Offices and many other shops dis- playing a 8T sign in their window. Most phone boxes take coins. There are public phone boxes outside most train and bus stations, outside most Post Offices, and throughout the town centre. It costs the most to make calls 9am-1 pm Monday to Friday. It is cheapest to call before 8am and after 4 pm. Useful numbers (You don't need money to dial these from a public call box, but they are NOT free from a private phone!): 100: The Operator: will help you make a call 24 hours a day. 155: For help in making an International call. 192: For help in finding a UK number, 24 hours a day. 153: For help finding an international number, 24 hours a day. Corinne Sharpe 6. HanMwMTe, nO)l(any£1cTa, OTseTHoe nMCbMO Kop H Wapn C 6naro- AapHocTblO 3a MH<I>opMaL4MIO, ecnM OHa BaM nOHpaBMnaCb. WORDLIST complete [k;} m 'p Ii:t] - 3aBepwaTb host family - ceMbSJ, B KOTOpOi1 Bbl rOCTTe local ['l;}ukl] - MecTHblt1 magnetic strip [mreg'netik strip] - HaMarHII1eH- HaSJ nO/lOCKa pass through ['pa:s 8ru:] - npoe3)t(aTb Phonecard ['f;}unka:d] - Telle4>oHHaSJ KapTa price [prais] - u.eHa private phone - J1&.1'-1Hbli1 TeJ1ect.>oH remove [ri'm u:v] - npOABHraTb return ticket [ri't;}:n] - 61t1J1eT Ha noe3AKY TyAa It1 06paTHO single ticket ['siIJgl] - 6Lt1J1eT Ha nOe3AKY B OAHY CTOPOHY slot [sk>t] - npope3b ticket ['tikit] - 6&.1J1eT ticket gate ['tikit geit) - TypHIt1KeT Travelcard ['trrevlka:d] - npoe3AHoi161t1J1eT Ha aBT06yc H MeTpo valid ['vrelid] - rOAHbl value ['vrelju:] - u.eHHOCTb vary ['vEri] - pa3J1lt1yaTbcSJ weekly bus pass ['wi:kli 'bAS 'pa:s] - npoe3AHoi1 aST06YCHbl£1 6it1J1eT Ha OAHY HeAeJ110 I!tmD lIB 
7. Listen and read. Lighting up time A hundred years ago, the lamplighters in London were very busy men. It was their job, every evening, to light the thousands of gas lamps in the city. The gentle light from those lamps was all that lit the -foggy streets of Victorian London. Nowadays we have electric lamps in most of London. They switch them- selves on and off automatically and do the job of the lamplighter for him. But some parts of London still have their traditional gas lamps. And on some evenings you can still see the lamplighter. Most of the gas lamps are in the parks and outside the royal palaces. The Queen likes to keep the tradition alive and has gas lamps outside Bucking- ham Palace and St. James's Palace. Westminster, the home of the Houses of Parliament, has 400, more than any other part of the capital. Naturally, traditions are important in that part of London. But perhaps the Law is more traditionalist than anyone. For at the Temple, where the biggest law courts in London are, a lamplighter still goes round every evening to light the gas lamps by hand. The story of a statue If you ever come to London you will surely go to Trafalgar Square. The main feature of the Square is Nelson's Column with the figure of the great seaman on the top. Just behind it is the National Gallery where there is one of the finest col- lections of pictures in the world. In the middle of the road there is an interes- ting statue which is one of the finest in Great Britain. It is in bronze and rep- resents Charles I on horseback. The Statue of Charles I has a very amusing history. After the English Civil War (1642-1646) it was taken down and sold to a cutler. He immediately made great numbers of knives and forks with bronze handles. He told every- body that they were the best knives and that he had made them from the metal of the statue. They were rapidly bought, both by the friends and the enemies of the late monarch. The cutler soon made a lot of money and retired from busi- ness. Some time after the Restoration the government wanted to put up a new statue to the memory of Charles I. When the cutler heard of this he told the government that he had hidden the old statue and that he would sell it to them at a moderate price. They agreed and the monument was put up again in the place where it stands now. WORDLIST Buckingham Palace ebAkiIJm Iprelis] - 6YKH- reMCIG1 ABopeu. Charles [tf a: lz] -LJapllb3 civil war r-sivl w:] - rpIDK)J.aHCKcUI BotiHa court [k:t] - CYA cutler r-kAtl] - ToproBeu. HO)KaMVI enemy r-enimi] - Bpar foggy ['fgi] - ryMaHHblt1 gas lamp - ra30BaSJ llaMna gentle [lc3entl] - 3A. Clla6bl, MSJrKt1 government ['gAvnmnt] - npaBVlTeJ1bCTBO handle ['hrend] - pYYKa keep the tradition alive [ki:p trldif( )n Ilaiv]- coxpaHSJTbTpVlU. lamplighter elremPllait] - oHapWaK law [1::>:] - 3aKOH om I!mDI memory ememri] -- naMSJTb monarch em::>nk] - MOHapx naturally [Inretf r(  )li] - eCTeCTBeHHO Nelson's Column fne]snz 'klm] - KOllOHHa HellbCOHa rapidly ['rrepidli] - 6b1CTPO restoration LrestlreiJ(  )n] - pecTaBpau.II1SJ retire [riltai] -YAaJ1SJTbCSJ OT Aell statue estretju:] - cTarySJ the National Gallery rnrefnl 'grelari] - Ha[.tLt1o- HaJlbHasI raJlepeSJ the Temple etempl] - TeMnJ1 (J10HAOHCKoe 06ecT- BO (3ABOKaTOB  3AaHVle, B KOTOpOM OHO nOMeaeTcSJ) T rafalgar Square - T paaJ1brapcKaSJ n.noan.b Westminster ['westminst] - BecTMHcTepcK ABopeu. 
t 8. Listen and read. Ottawa - Canada's capital city Otta\jva is the capital city of Canada. It is located on the southern bank of the Ottawa River. Many interesting historical and cultural buildings are found in Ottawa, such as the Museum of Natural History, Museum of Man, National Gallery and the National Arts Centre. However, the most important buildings in Ottawa are the Parliament Buildings. Here the Canadian federal government discusses and makes laws for Canada. Ottawa has been called the Tulip City, because every spring the city comes alive with thousands of tulips from the Netherlands. Queen Juliana started sending 15,000 tulips a year to Ottawa in 1946 as a way of thanking the Cana- dian people for the time she spent in Canada with her daughters during World War II. Juliana stayed in Ottawa with her family from 1940 to 1945 after the Ne- therlands was invaded by Germany. Red and white with single maple leaf flag was adopted. r \ ,\  '1 . . '.:110' ... .. . ,.  'T ,h .. ," ..- I ". j I '" 'I I \ i \ .,. ( A \ t , - . , ,..,t:;. , '\ , .!'  - -" , r ,.. Ottawa has been called the Tulip City, .. ... because every spring the city \ti l:  ,. comes alive with thousands of tulips -  from the Netherlands. « ... . - . , -. . l 9. BblnMwMTe, nO)l(anyi1cTa, rnaronbl B cl>opMe naCCBHoro 3a- nora M nepeCKa)l(MTe TeKCT, Mcnonb3YH MX. WORDLIST adopt ['dpt] - npHLt1MaTb bank [breI) k] - 6eper be located [1u'keitid] - 6blTb paCnOllO)KeHHbiM capital ['krepitl] - CTOJ1Lt1u.a come alive [kAm 'laiv] - O)KVlBaTb discuss [dis'kAS] - 06cAaTb federal ['fedrl] - <peAepallbHbli1 find [faind] (found, found) - HaXOAIt1Tb however [hau'ev] - OAHaKO invade [in'veid] - oKKYnlt1pOBaTb maple [meipl] - KIleH, KIleHoBbli1 National Arts Centre rnrefnl o:t 'sent]- Hau.1.10HaIlbHbli1 eHTp VlCKYCCTB Natural History ['nretfrl 'histri] - MY3ei1 eCTe- CTB03HaHVl5I Ottawa ['tw] -f. OTTaBa Parlament ['pa:lmnt] - napJ1aMeHT such as [SAU dZ] - TaKoi1, KaK tulip ['tju:lip] - TlOllbnaH I!lmD 1m 
. \ '  ,, ," It\ \.. I '. .' '"' ' , :" ,', .\t61 '.... . ',- .  \C I' . , . I ......... . , I" . I . . '''t - ' ',. i..c.- ., .. - -. .1. " ,  O. "t"I' , --"'  - I I , } .. ,  I . }  10. Listen and read. Sydney Sydney is Australia's oldest city. Captain Cook stopped near here at Bota- ny Bay in 1770. The first Europeans who came to Australia put up their tents at Sydney Cove. Soon the first houses were built, and in only 200 years the city grew from nothing into a home for of millions of people. Despite the history, Sydney is the most modern place in Australia. Its buildings are the highest, its fashions are the newest and its colours are the brightest. A lot of Australia's exciting cultural life is found in Sydney. Artists, writers, opera singers and film makers all live here. So some people call the city "the Paris of the Pacific." But that doesn't seem Quite right. Paris hasn't got all that sea, sand, sun and surf. Sydneysiders, as well as many visitors to Australia, come to Bondi Beach to relax and take a rest. Some of them really relax. Others are too busy - they're jogging, swimming, or riding the great wa- ves on their surfboards. \- ..' \. -.. }lilt.., -='''- . - 1 -, 'f. ... , ""'11:  . 't. . I.,  , , to... .J  l .' . . '1  - - _--L..:' ....   '.. .. t . .. . -............ ,<It .   '.- '- 1. . ..... .... ". ",. ., ... '". . ... t." , /1 , ."", . . :. · '.':Hi;..,.. . .... Co,," , . . I .. .  ;., . \ I: - . . '! ..  .... j  '''- \ ..  i\. _. I. .. " . , .., ... .." . 4 t a. I ' . " - ,-..- I... -... '!r _ , . ,. J . , .\ . t .k ,. " ..  - ... t .. .. - Top: Sydney. "The Strand" shaping arcade Right top: Sydney Opera House Right: Sydney. Skyline !  r I; "-,  t · :::-::: -::: :: --==----: ::-: -::::.=:::: , ) ...--;,- -:.: .::..... ---... -==-:: , -=::  3::. I ".n toU\ P'l I' WII! ;".; I, p - , : .:.::: 'II . :H;i ! .:,:,.. ..." .. ....... .. ..  'lor I .. , -. ;;: , . . ,.... - . ;--  ,- - .- ---:- - . .... __. -.. . - or' ... . , _'" .t1I...., , 'W'-" - . ( .... ... ," . WORDLIST artist ['a:tist] - XYAO)KHLt1K cove [kuv] - 6yxra despite [dis1pait] - HecMoTpfl ria exciting [iklsaitilJ] -3A. 611cTaTellbHafi jog [cB9] - 6eraTb TpYCUOi1 relax [ri'lreks] - pacclla6i11TbcSJ ride [raid] (rode, ridden) - KaTaTbCS1 om I!1mD sand [rend] - neCOK surf [s:f] - np60 surfboard ['s:b:d] - AOCKa AJlS1 cepCPIt1Hra tent [tent] - nanaTKa Pacific Ocean ['psitik 'uf(  )n] - TVlXLt1i1 OKeaH wave [weiv] - BOllHa 
 .I'  11. Listen . nd read. The White House The White House is an important part of Washington, D.C. It is where the president lives and works. George Washington is the only president who did not live there. John Adams was the first president to live in the White House. He and his family moved into the house in 1800. The White House has 132 rooms. Visitors may tour some of the first-floor room, second floor is "home" for the president and his family. The White Ho- use has many special rooms. It even has a private bowling alley and a movie theater. , I It' ---- . 11_ - ..  to ... . .... 1 . Is it true or false? 1) George Washington did not live in the White House. 2) John Adams was the first president to live in the White House. 3) The president and his family live on the first floor. 4) There are 132 rooms in the White House. 5) Visitors can tour all of the rooms in the White House. 6) Our current president lives and works in the White House. 7} The White House is located in the state of Washington. A monument to a pest It has been discovered that the town of Enterprise, in the south of the USA, has a monument to the weevil, number one pest of cotton-growers. Why? Because after losing their fight with this pest, the farmers of that area had to turn to other crops and one of them, peanuts, has since brought thern more money than they ever made from cotton. Of course, this must be the only place in the whole world where a pest has been given such an honour. WORDLIST George Washington [cBxct 'wfilJtn] - oprot< BaWi'1HrTOH John Adams [jn 'redmz] -A>KOH AAaMc move in [muv] - nepeexaTb movie theater ['8it] - KHoTeaTp pest [pest] - HaceKoMoe-BpeAi'1Tellb private ('praivit] - JU1Hbl tour rtu] - cOBepwaTb 3KCKYPCLt11Q weevil ['wi:vil] - AOllrOHOCi'1K I!JmD 116 
13. HaMAMTe Bce cny'taM Mcnonb30saHMSI rnarona "have" M KpaT- KO nepeCKa)l(MTe cOAep)l(aHMe TeKCTa. 14. 06bSlcHMTe npeAnO>KeHMe: "A pest has been given such an honour. " · 15. Pa3b1rpaMTe AManor: . .. Tom We don't even suspect how little creatures, insects or animals, affect our life? Bob What do you mean? Tom Maybe I seem to be very philosophical, but this little story nlakes me think that there are no accidental things in the world. Bob Oh, I see. You mean the above story and how the farmers have gained frorn the battle. 16. Be a guide. With your partner decide where you would like to go, and what you would like to do, if you had the opportunity to travel around the world for three days. List some of the things you ould do each day. This time you can pretend that money is no object! Day One Day Two Day Three 7. With a partner plan how you would spend day and night if you had the opportunity to visit any capital of an English-speaking coun ry. Day One 8. Finally if ou onl ha a fe- h u -n t .e U.S. wh t is the one thing yo-I «;t .-  t 118 
. . ., 19. npO'lMTaMTe WYTKM M npoMrpaMTe MX. The world's best Scottish joker A little Scottish boy burst into the house and said to his father: "Daddy, Daddy, I ran home behind the bus and saved ten pence." His father replied, "You could have done better son. You could have run home behind a taxi and saved fifty." A useful piece of advice "Now, when we cross the street, my dear," said the old lady to her friend, "don't look round, because if a motor-car hits us in the back, it's their fault not ours. " Caution A man in a bus paid a penny at the end of each stage. This went on for six stages. At last, when the man was about to leave the bus the conductor asked him, "Why didn't you pay a sixpence all at once?" - "But what if there was an accident on the way?" replied the passenger. The most striking things "What struck you most on your travels?" "Other people's umbrellas." A ready reply "Say, Jack, can you tell me where the Empire State Building is?" 'lAnd how do you know my name is Jack?" "I guessed it." "Are you good at guessing, sir?" "Fine. " "Then guess where the Empire State Building is." In a barber's shop McNab went into a barber's shop and asked the barber hovi much a haircut was. "A pound," said the barber. "How much is a shave?" asked McNab. "Fifty pence," said the barber. "Shave my head," said McNab. WORDLIST . accident ['reksidnt] - cJ1yYa advice [d'vais] - coseT back [brek] - CnLt1Ha barber's shop rbo: bs f:>p] - My>KCKaSJ nap1t1KMaxep- CKa51 burst in [b:st] - BopBaTbCSJ caution ['k:f(  )n] - OCTOpO)t(HOCTb fault ['f:>:lt] - BLt1Ha haircut ['hEkAt] - CTpLt1)t(Ka hit (hit, hit) - YAapSJTb reply [ri'plai] - OTBeyaTb save [seiv] -SKOHOMLt1Tb shave Ueiv] - 6Pi-iTb stage [steict] - OCTaHOBKa strike [straik] (struck, struck) - 3A nOpa3lt1Tb I!mID 1m 
The first price A London magazine once organized a competition to discover the most lo- ved painting in the Tate Gallery. Contestants were asked to answer the follo- wing question: If the Tate Gallery were on fire and you were allowed to save one painting which one would it be? First prize went to a Scotsman, who answered, "The one nearest the door. " 20. Bbl6epHTe HY>KHYIO MAMOMY. 1) A boy stops you to ask directions to the Post office. You give him very good directions, but can't remember the name of the street the Post office is on. You say... a) It's on the tip of my tongue. b) Zip your lip. 2) You and a friend are shopping. She asks to borrow money for a Coke. Next, she wants money for lunch. She then asks if you can pay for a movie. You say, "No!.." a) I feellihe I'm walking on air. b) This is where I draw the lins. c) I have a frog in my throat. 3) You're feeling very nbrvOLJS before your final examination. You tell your friend.. . a) I have a green thumb. b) I have butterflies in my stomach. 4) My mother grows wonderful flowers in the country. Everybody says she. .. a) She's shorthanded. b) She has a green thumb. 5) You are in the school library with some friends. Instead of studying, you are all talking quietly and sornetimes laughing out loud. The librarian comes to your table and says to you... a) Zip your lip. b) You'd better stay on your toes. r KEY 1) a; 2) b; 3) b; 4) b; 5) a. WORDLIST allow ['lau] -pa3pewaTb competition [.k:)mpj'tiJ(  )n] - KOHKYPC contestant [kn'testnt] - KOHKYPcaHT discover [dis'kA V] - o6Hapv1Tb Tate Gallery [teit 'glri] -- raJIepe Tei1T Ifm I!mID 
DEVELOPMENTS A Forgetful Tourist Once a tourist arrived in Paris. It was his first visit there. When he arrived at the railway station, he at once asked the porter to show him the way to t;,e nearest post office. There he sent a telegram to his wife in which he informed her that he had arrived safely. In this telegram he told her the address of the hotel where he intended to stay. Then he went direct to the hotel, left his luggage there and went for a walk. As it was his first visit to the French capital, he was very much interested to see the streets, museums and shops of this beautiful city, and spent the greater part of the day there. ,. ,.(}---. Then he realized he had forgotten the ad- ,  I dress of the hotel. ;;J'  Who could help the poor man? Suddenly he remembered the telegram which he had sent to his wife on his arrival. She knew his address and could help him. So at night his wife received this extraordi- nary telegram: "Please send me my address at once. " CJ- C;:r ...... 'a f ,I!; ,t.   "\\ -  c:a  '- ..    - \ r 21. nepeBeAMTe, nO)l(anYMcTa, TeKCT Ha PYCCKHM Sl3bIK. Androcles A slave named Androcles once escaped from his master and fled to the forest. As he was wandering about the forest he came upon a Lion lying down moaning and groaning. At first he turned to run, but finding that the Lion did not pursue him, he turned back and went up to him. As he came near, the Lion put out his paw, which was all swollen and ble- eding, and Androcles found that a huge thorn had got into it, and was causing all the pain. He pulled out the thorn and bound up the paw of the Lion, who was soon able to rise and lick the hand of Androcles. Then the Lion took Androcles to his cave. But shortly afterwards both Androcles and the Lion were captured and the slave was sentenced to be thrown to the Lion, after the latter had been kept without food for several days. The Emperor and all his Court came to see the spectacle, and Androcles was led out into the middle of the arena. Soon the WORDLIST address ['dres] - aApec at once [t IW Ans] - HeMeAlleHHO bleed [bli:d] (bled, bled) - KpOBOTOYLt1Tb, Lt1CTeKaTb KPOBblO Court [k:t] -ABOP (KOPOJ1S1) Emperor ['emp()r] -Lt1MnepaTOp extraordinary [ik'str:dnri] - He06blyai1Hbli1 forgetful [f'getful] - 3a6b1BYBblt1 lick [lik] - J1i113aTb luggage ['IAgi<t] - 6arIDK moan [mun] -CTOHaTb paw [p:] -J1ana post office ['pust ,:>fis] - nOYTa, nOYTOBOe OTAelleHiI1e pursue [plsjU:] - npeClleAOBaTb, rHaTbCSI safely ['seifli] - B coxpaHHOCTiI1 sentence [Isentns] - oCY>J(AaTb, npil1rOSapLt1BaTb slave [sleiv] - pa6 stay [steil - OCTaHaBlll-1BaTbCSI swollen ['swuln] - pacnyxwi1 thorn [e:n] - wn, KOJ1IOYKa wander ['wnd ] - CKTaTbCSI, 6J1y)t(AaTb. 6pOATb II!mID 1m 
I KEY Lion was let loose from his den, and rushed roaring at his victim. But as soon as he came near to Androcles he recognized his friend, and licked his hand like a friendly dog. The Emperor, surprised at this, invited Androcles to him, and he told the Emperor the whole story. Then the slave was pardoned and freed, and the Lion let loose to his native forest. "GRATITUDE IS THE SIGN OF NOBLE SOULS. II AHAPOKn OAHa>KAbl pa6 no lt1MeHlt1 AHAPOKJ1 C6e)f(a11 OT CBoero X03lt1Ha lt1 YCTpeMltt11CS1 8 11ec. 6pOA no 11ecy, OH HaTKHY11c Ha 11e)f(aw.ero, )f(a1106HO cToHyw.ero nbBa. CHaya11a OH 6POClt111C 6e)f(aTb npOYb, HO 06HapY)f(lt1B, YTO neB He rOHlt1TCS1 3a Hlt1M, OH nOBepHYll Ha3CiA lt1 nOAowell K HeMY. KorAa AHAPOKll nOAowe11 611 lt1)f(e , neB BbITHYll llany, KOTopa pacnYXlla lt1 KpOBOTOLflt1J1a, lt1 AHAPOKll 06Hap\f)Klt111, YTO B He 3acell orpOMHbl wlt1n, KOTOpbl  6blll nplt1Ylt1HO 60J1lt1. OH BbITaw.lt111 Wlt1n lt1 nepeB3all llany nbBa, KOTOpbl BCKope CMor BCTaTb lt1 lllt13Hyrb PYKY AHAPOKlla. 3aTeM neB nOBell AHAPOKna B CBOIO new.epy. Ho BCKope nOClle 3Toro lt1 AHAPOKlla lt1 nbBa nOMaIllt1, lt1 pa6a nplt1rOBOplt111lt1 6POCTb Ha CbeAeHlt1e nbSY nOC11e Toro, KaK nbBa npOAep)f(aIllt1 HeCKOJ1bKO AHe 6e3 nlttLlJ.ltt. M. neparop lt1 Beeb ero ASOP nplt1W11lt1 nocMoTpeTb npeACTaBJ1eHlt1e, lt1 AHAPOKlla BbIBeJ1 Ha CepeAlt1HY apeHbl. BCKope nbBa BblnycTLtlJ1lt1lt13 KneTKlt1, lt1 OH C peBoM 6poclt1J1c Ha )f(epTBY. Ho KaK TOJ1bKO neB nplt1611lt131t111C K AHAPOKllY, OH Y3HaIl CBoero APyra lt1 111t13HYJ1 eMY PYKY, KaK BepHbl nec. V13YMJleHHbl 3TO cu.eHO lttMnepaTOp nplt1r11aCltt11 AHAPOKlla K ce6e,  TOT paCCKa3an eMY BCIO lt1CTOplt1lO. nOClle 3Toro pa6a npoCTlt111lt1 lt1 OCB060Alt1J1lt1, a nbSa OTnycTlttJ1lt1 Ha B01110 B ero POAHO J1ee. "6J1arOAapHocTb - nplt13HaK 6J1arOpOACTBa AYWlt1". 2. npO'lMTaMTe nMCbMO CawM M HanMW e 3 COH nMCbMO, onMCbI- oalOwee TO CTO, KYAa 6bl Bbi ",oTen npMrnaCMTb nlO6oro M3 eMbM 3p3TOB. Sasha came back to Russia and sent a letter to Alison. Dear Alison, I want you to come to Russia and visit the land of white nights. We shall go to St. Petersburg, Petrodvorets, Kizhy and Valaam! The best time for a trip is from June to July. Come and have a good time! The best starting point for a trip is St. Petersburg which we can get to by plane from Moscow (one hour and a half flying time) or by train (one night). We shall get to Kizhi and Valaam by a passenger ship from St. Petersburg. Even if you make your trip in midsummer, take along a sweater and a warm jacket. Karelian weather is changeable and the evenings are cool and windy. Yours, Sasha WORDLIST changeable ('tfeincBbl] - Vl3MeHYBbl cool (ku:J] - npOXJ1a)J.Hbli1 den (de n] - 3A. KJleTKa flying time ['flail) 'taim] - BpeM nOJ1era Ha CaMOlleTe gratitude ('grretitju:d] - 61larOAapHocTb jacket ['cBrekit] - KYPTKa Kizhy [ki3i] - KLt1>KVI native ['neitiv] - pOAHOi1 noble [nubl] - 6J1arOpOAHbl pardon [pa:dn] - npoaTb 1m Unit 5 passenger ('presi n<t)] - naCCIDKVlp Petrodvorets - neTpOABOpel.\ point [pint] - nYHKT. TOlfKa roar [r:] - peB, WYM soul ('Sd ul] - Aywa 81. Petersburg [,snt 'pi:tzb:g] - CaHKT -nerep6ypr start [sta:t] -OTnpaBJ1TbC, HaYVlHaTb trip [trip] - noe3AKa, nYTeWeCTBLt1e Valaam - BaJlaaM victim ['viktim] - )l(epTBa 
23. Listen, read. Can you make a back translation? Aopora 3JU1COH!  X04Y, T06bl Tbl, KorAa noeAeWb B POCCIO, n06blsana B KpatO 6eJ1blX Hoe. Mbl noeAeM B CaHKT-neTep6ypr, neTpoABope, K)t(  BanaaM. nY4wee BpeM Af1 noe3AK - c IOH no lOnb. npe3)1(a  XOPOWO npOSeAlt1 BpeMs:I! nY4we Bcero HaaTb nYTeweCTBe c CaHKT-neTep6ypra. AO KOToporo Mbl MO)l(eM Ao6paTbc 3 MOCKBbl caMoneTOM (1,5 LJaca Ha CaMOJ1eTe) J1 noe3- AOM (oAHa H04b). 3 CaHKT-neTep6ypra Mbl A06epeMc AO K)I(e  BaJ1aaMa Ha naCCa)l(pCKOM TennOXOAe. AIDKe ecn Tbl 6YAewb nyrewecTBoBaTb B cepeAHe neTa, B03bM cBTep  TenJlYtO KYPTKY. noroAa B KapeJll-1 3MeHBa51,  no BeepaM npOXllMHO  BeTpeHHO. Sasha enclosed information about the land of white nights. 24. CAenaMTe, nO)l(anYMcTa, o6paTHbiM nepeBOA M nonpo6YHTe 6blTb rMAOM no 3TOMY KpalO. nOMHMTe 0 naCCtBHOM 3anore. The Land of White Nights The town of Petersburg was founded on 16 May, 1703. Several generati- ons of talented Russian and foreign architects were engaged in the planning and construction of Petersburg's downtown. Petersburg is one of the world's most beautiful cities. The Summer Garden, the Winter Palace, the Hermitage, the monument to Peter I, the Russian Museum are the city's remarkable architectural sights. Soon after Petersburg appeared, it turned into the main center of Russian science and culture. Outstanding scholars like M. V. Lomonosov, D. I. Mende- leyev, I. P. Pavlov and many others engaged themselves in activities of the Academy of Sciences and the University. A. S. Pushkin, M. Y. Lermontov, N. A. Nekrasov glorified the city in many of their works. There are many memorial places in the city that relate to life and creative work of the great Russian writers N. V. Gogol, T. M. Dostoevsky. the composers M. I. Glinka, P. I. Chaikovskiy, M. P. Musorgskiy, N. A. Rimskiy-Korsakov, the painters K. P. Bryullov, I. Y. Repin, I. N. Krams- koy, V. I. Surikov, etc. St. Petersburg today is a centre of scien- ce and culture, well-developed industries including shipbuilding, a large international port on the Baltic Sea. ,  1 \ . . t . \." . .. .,...., \. .. ... .. ... - Jo .. " .  . ,  .i "1"". .: " "1. . -".;..-  . t .Oft'" . . ;\ .... .., :   - ', .... ........ " .'" -, .  l . . .  .. .  ' ,r.  ;  :. . ....j..;..-" , - t,,-' J - . - _ ,,' "-4.> t :"i,. r ;('." ...... ,- I<.'"' \' .,,-1 ...... .. .t, ,1. 1. .A. "., ,.. St. Petersburg. The Summer Garden WORDLIST appear ['pi] - B03HVlKaTb, nOS1BJ1S1TbCS1 architectural [.a:ki'tektf(  )rl] - apXVlTeKTYPHbli1 composer [km'puz] - KOMn03V1Top construction [kn'strAkf( )n] - 3acTpoi1Ka downtown ['daun 'taun] - AeJlOBaS1 yaCTb ropOAa (eHTp ) engage [in'gei<t3] - npVlBJleKaTb generation [.cBen'reif(  )n] - nOKOJleH1-1e glorify ['gl:rifai] - npOCnaBJlS1Tb, BOCCJ1aBJ1S1Tb ..,.-' international [.intd:'nrefnl] - Me>KAYHapoAHbl outstanding [.aut'strendilJ] - BbIAatOL1I.Vli1CS1 palace ['prelis] - ABopeu. prominent ['prminnt] - Lt13BeCTHbli1 scholar ['sk]] - yyeHbli1 shipbuilding ['fip,bildilJ] - Kopa6J1eCTpOeHe sights [sai ts] - AOCl Onp"'1-1MeyaTeJ1bHOCTVI, naMS1TH1-1KVI turn into ['t:n lint] - CTaTb, CTaHOB1"TbCS1 Unit 5 mJ 
10. ' II t . J  " r .- .1. I . t d , " II t , - , 11 I '" ] I . In t . \ I .t . " . . J :.' ' I , \) I  !  \ t. . ....  . , . ",. j I ! J '" I ) III ;l .  " .. , ... . \  I.;" IL . ... t . ", 4: fJ-:  " -. I , 'I I \ ..... - : l . .. . . .- \' - ..,  -- ....... -- . . .. . l_i - - " \" ..,. 1- " - Petrodvorets (Peterhof) Pushkin (Tsarskoe Selo) Speaking of 5t. Petersburg one may not omit mentioning its famous su- burbs. Petrodvorets (Peterhof), Pushkin (Tsarskoe Selo), Pavlovsk, Lomono- sov are museums of history and art. Russian and foreign tourists visit St. Pe- tersburg suburbs to see outstanding pieces of Russian art. Magnificent architectural ensembles, sculptures, a unique water-duck, system for numerous fountains, fine examples of park-landscape art make one solemnly proud of the generations of Russian people who have managed to create, in rotten swamp, such great masterpieces of human genius. Anyone who visits Karelia will always be tempted to come back. Karelia is a country of one thousand lakes, and more than 23 thousand rivers. Almost all of them are less than 10 km long. About half of Karelia's territory is covered with woods, mostly pine and fir. Let's start on a voyage by the Neva River and Ladoga and Onega Lakes to the famous islands of Valaam and Kizhy, to see the charming nature of the northern land. Kizhy is a small island (7 km long and about one and a half km wide) in lake Onega, Europe's second largest. The Kizhy is called "Russian Wonder." The most precious thing in Kizhy is 22-cupola Cathedral of the Transfigura- tion built in 1714. Its walls, ceilings and roof were made of pine trees without any nails, using only an axe. The twenty-two cupolas are of different size which gives the cathedral a fairy-tale look. We don't know anything about the man of genius who built the it. There is a legend on Kizhy that this church was created (built) by Master Nestor. Having WORDLIST charming etfa:milJ) -QlIapOBaTef1bHbli1, npeKpacHbli1 famous ['feimds] - 3HaMeHTbli1 fir (f:] - eJ1b island ['aildnd] - OCTpOB magnificent (mreg'nifisnt] - Bef1L1KOJ1enHbl manage ['mrenict] -CYMeTb masterpiece ['ma:st,pi:s] - weAesp, TBopeHe one may not omit mentioning ('menfdniIJ) - HeJ1b3s:1 He ynoMSlHyrb pine [pain] - COCHa precious thing ['prefs 8ilJ] - u.eHHOCTb rotten ['r3tn) - rHLt1J10 suburb ['sAbd:b) - npropOA swamp ['sw3mp] - Tonb voyage (v3ii<t)] - nyTeweCTBe will be tempted [temptid] - He YAep>KLt1TCs:I OT CKYWeHs:I 1m I!lmD 
, . . 1 ..... Kizhi. Cathedral of the Transfiguration and Church of the In- tercession of the Virgin , , " " .. . '.\ ....... , ' i - Karelia. Wooden church in the village of Man'ga built it, he threw his axe into Lake Onega with the words, "There has never been, there isn't and there will never be anything like it." There is another legend that says that the construction of the Church is connected with Peter the Great, who drew up the design himself. However, there is no documentary proof to these two legends. The island Valaam is the biggest on the Ladoga. There is a monastery on the island. It was founded by Novgorod townsfolk and stood to defend Russian land borders, and many times repelled Swedish attacks. The monastery was ruined in the early XVII century, but restored in the XVIII century. Along with trees that are common to these latitudes, you can see oak, cedar groves, alleys of silver fir and fruit gardens. The magnificent nature of these parts has inspired many Russian painters: I. I. Shishkin, F. A. Vasilyev, A. I. Kuindzhi. One will never forget the vast, deep rivers and lakes as great as the sea. The walls of northern structures were always made of pine. The carpenters always tried to make the building stand as long as possible. 22 domes are re- liable protection against the wet. When it rains, water falls from the upper to the lower domes, which throw water far away from the walls. That is why the wooden church has managed to survive so long. There are also other interesting wooden constructions, small chapels, living houses, etc. Kizhi! People from every corner of the world keep coming here. They speak different languages but all agree on one point: Kizhi is incomparable! WORDLIST alley ['reli] - aJ1J1eS1 border ['b:da ] - rpaH,-,a, py6e)K cedar ['si:d] - KeAPOBaS1 defend [di'fend] -3aw.w.aTb early [':1i] - BHaaJ1e grove [grauv] -pow.a incomparable [intkmp( a )rbl] - 6ecnoA06Hblt1, HecpaBHeHHbli1 inspire [in'spaia] - BAOXHOBJ1S1Tb latitude ['lretitju:d] - wpOTa Novgorod townsfolk [nvgrd 'tawnz'fuk]- HOBrOpOALI.bl repel [ri'pel] - oTpIDKaTb restore (ris't:] - BOCCTaHaBJ1V1BaTb ruin [ruin] - pa3pywaTb vast [va:st] - orpoMHblt1 ImnD 1m 
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., =1 .. ... !II. :!'I ga The town of Petersburg was foun- ded on 16 May 1703. I know the Summer Garden, the Win- ter Palace, the Hermitage, the monument to Peter I, the Russian Museum. 3) What is the most precious The most precious thing in Kizhy is 22- thing in Kizhy? cupola Cathedral of the Transfiguration. 25. npoBeAMTe 3KCKYPCMIO no cBoeMY POAHOMY ropOAY, no KM- )l(aM, no neTep6ypry. Be a guide 1) Ladies and gentlemen! I'd like to draw your attention to this monument (church, palace, bridge, cathedral, building, sculpture, fountain). 2) Our city (town) is famous for its straight and wide streets (beautiful parks, architectural ensembles, historical places, churches, numerous monu- ments). 3) This magnificent church (bridge, castle, tower, wall, canal, road, port; in the 17th century, under Peter the Great, by order of N., after the design of K.) was built in 1714 (...). 4) The (castle, tower, cathedral, road, bridge, canal) foundation to dates back to (Ivan the Terrible, the time of Suvorov, the pre-war time, the time of the Roman Empire, the time of Peter the Great). 26. npO'lMTaMTe, nO)l(anYMcT3, TeKCT. Bbl6epHTe a 3aL\ MnM ABa, KO- Topble 8aM nOHpaBMnMCb, M BblY'lMTe MX HaM3YCTb. 3aTeM 3anM- WHTe MX no naMSITM. CAename, nO)l(anyi1cTa, 06paTHbiM nepeBOA. Questions and answers: 1) When was the town of Pe- tersburg founded? 2) Which of the city's architec- tural sights do you know? If You're Wrong, Admit It By Dale Carnegie (Abridged) I live almost in the geographical centre of greater New York; yet within a minute's walk of my house there is a wild forest. This unspoiled woodland is called "Forest Park". I frequently go walking in this park with Rex, my little Boston bulldog. He is a friendly, harmless little dog, and since we rarely meet anyone in the park, I take Rex along without a leash or a muzzle. One day we met a policeman in the park. "What do you mean by letting that dog run loose in the park without a muzzle and leash?" he reprimanded me. "Don't you know it is against the law?" "Yes, I know it is," I replied softly, "but I didn't think he would do any harm out here. IJ "You didn't think! You didn't think! That dog might kill a squirrel or bite a child. Now, I'm going to let you off this time; but if I catch this dog out here again without a muzzle and a leash, you'll have to tell it to the judge." I promised to obey. WORDLIST harmless [tho: mlis] - 6e306AHblt1 judge ['cBAcB] - CYAbS1 leash [li:f] - nOBOAOK, npLt1BS13b let somebody off - oTnycTTb Koro- TO loose ['lu:s] -cB060AHO muzzle ['mAzI] - HaMOPAHLt1K rarely ['re 1 i] - peAKO reprimand ['repri,mo:nd] - AeJ1aTb BblrOBOp unspoiled LAn'spild] - HeTpOHyTbli1 wild [waild] - AVlKi1 yet within [jet wi'oin] -TeM He MeHee EmDIm 
And I did obey - for a few times. But Rex didn't like the muzzle, and neither did I; so we decided to take a chance. Everything was lovely for a while. Rex and I raced over the hill one afternoon and there, suddenly - to my surprise -I saw "the Majesty of the Law." Rex was out in front, running in the direction of the of- ficer. I was in for it. I knew it. So I didn't wait until the policeman started talking. I t said: "Officer, you've caught me red-handed. I'm guilty. I have no alibis, no excu- ses. You warned me last week that if I brought this dog out here again without a muzzle you would fine me." "Well, now," the policeman answered in a soft tone. "I know it's a temptation to let a little dog like that have a run out here when nobody is around." "Sure it's a temptation," I replied, "but it is against the law." "Well, a little dog like that isn't going to harm anybody,JJ said the policeman. "No, but he may kill squirrels," I said. "Well, now, I think you are taking this a bit too seriously," he told me. "I'll tell you what you do. You just let him run over the hill there where I can't see him- and we'll forget all about it." That policeman, being human, wanted a feeling of importance; so when I be- gan to condemn myself, the only way he could nourish his self-esteem, was to show mercy. But suppose I had tried to defend myself - well, did you ever argue with a po- liceman? But instead of breaking lances with him, I admitted that he was absolutely right and I was absolutely wrong; I admitted it quickly, openly, and with enthusiasm. Isn't it rTiuch easier to listen to self-criticism than to bear condemnation from alien lips? Remember the old proverb: "By fighting you never get enough, but by yielding you get more than you expected." So if you want to win people to your way of thinking, it would be advisable to remember the Rule: If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically. WORDLIST alien ['eiljn] - '-IY'f(oi1 bear [be] - BblHOCVlTb bite [bait] (bit, bitten) - KYcaTb break lances ['breik 'la: nSJS ) - J10MaTb KonbS1 catch 5mb red-handed - 6blTb 3axBaeHHb1M Ha MeCTe npecTynneHVlS1 condemn [kn'demJ - OCY'KAClTb condemnation r.kndcm'neif(  )n] - nplt1rOBOp emphatically [im'ftikJli] - Bblpa3TeJ1bHO encounter [in 'ka un t] - BCTpeTVlTb (HeO)l(Lt1AaHHO). HaTOJlKHyrbc fine [fain] - HanaraTb wTpacp guilty ['gilti] - BLt1HOBHbl 1m I!ImDI harm ['ha:m] - npVlHTb BpeA mercy ['m:si] - MLt1nOCepAe, CHlt1CXO)K.D.eHlt1e nourish rsnAriJ] - YKpenJ1Tb, 3A. nOJ1bCTl-1Tb obey ['bei] - CJ1ywaTbcS1J nOBt-1HOBaTbCS1 race [reis] - MaTbCS1, COCTS13aTbC B 6ere self-esteem ['selfis'ti:m] - caMoYBIDKeHt-1e take a chance [tfa:ns] - pLt1CKOBaTb take seriously esirisli] - cepbe3HO OTHOCt-1TbCS1 temptation [temp'teif()n] -cKYweHe, C06J1a3H the majesty of the law rmrecBsti] - ero BeJ1V1eCTBO aaKOH warn [w:n] - npeAocTeperaTb. npeAynpe)K,lJ.aTb yield [ji:ld] -ycrynaTb, CAaBaTbCS1 
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Aopore APY3b! Mbl XOTM, '-IT06bl Bbl 6b1Jl 3AOPOBbiM nOKOJleHeM,3aHMaJlCbCnOpTOM,XOAn B nOXOAbl, 6b1Jl 6Jl)I(e K nppoAe. C He HaAO o6paw.aTbC YMeJlO, TOrAa Bbl CMO>Ke- Te CnpaBTbC C HeO)f(AaHHbIM CTYau.s:I- M. Mbl n03HaKOMM Bac TalOKe C nOBeAeH- eM HaceKOMblX  paCTeH, OTHOCs:lW.MCs:I K Lt13MeHeHLt1M norOAbl. 3HaHLt1S1 3TX npL'1MeT AaCT BaM B03MO)f(HOCTb BcerAa LlYBCTBOBaTb ce6S1 ysepeHHee Ha npL'1pOAe L'1 B )f(L'13H. )l(eJlaeM ycnexa! 
su I L ILL Today, we have forgotten many survival skills, since we can buy nearly eve- rything we need. However, survival situations can still arise. Preparing to be a survivor You can greatly improve your survival chances if you try to keep physically fit. Even half an hour of exercise a day can improve your fitness. A note about food If you are inexperienced, it can be very dangerous to eat wild plants. You can easily become poisoned. Food gives you energy and can keep you healt- hy, so eat well before you go on an expedition, and take some food with you: r-  \ tUl  "" ,. II. .........' n . - " -' ., . - " ,nJ"" . .. ... ..  .. ...... "' ., .  .. v, ( . ." - - - - . (]) 000 0000 .'. J -'''''  ..... '\. -   , , ,\ ----- \ .... ..:::;,.. '\. \:\.. c  - , " """  ,oO.. .. ... ,.. '". -. .. """ .. . .. - -. .. .. ..' -, #' \. -- \) ")  a. .,,.--=---- -,  -...... \..-    .. '-..... .... --  ""- . .:. '. .:' -....:.. .' '. ..... .. ." .. --. .... . .. - I' f ,'J' 'I . t.. " . ,; ., ,  - .. "... WORD LIST arise ['raiz] (arose, arisen) - B03HVlKaTb, nOB- llTbC be inexperienced Linik'spirinst] - 6blTb He- onblTHblM dangerous ['deinct)rs] - onacHbli1 fit - 3A. 3AOPOBblC1 fitness ['fitnis]- 3A. 3AopoBbe forget [f'get] (forgot, forgotten) - 3a6blBaTb fresh [fref] - cBe)KLt1C1 . t . , " :t J.r.'. : '.'\ I ". _-....... C\ ,-. ........... :...'-.:/--... I I I  , , .. f' I '. ,f 1", , , ... ,., .....  . .. . .. .. - . ." \, ). .- -...'-- . .'". improve [im'pru:v] - ynYlfwaTb, cOBepweHcTBo- BaTb poison ['p:>izn] - A, OTpaBa powered milk ['paudd] - nopOWKOBoe M0J10KO skill - MacTepcTBo soup [su:p] - cyn survival [s'vaivl] - Bbl)KBaHVle wild plant [waild pla:nt] - ALt1KOe paCTeHt1e Unit 6 IDI 
Finding and collecting water I The water in your body helps to regulate your temperature. and keep it working pro- perly. Although you carry water with you may need to add to your supply by collecting wa- ter from the environment. There are tips on how to do this below. ,, ''''''t' ,v ... , .- . .. .  :: ": ..,Q; -.: . ... " I . -:;;. ",.  . " ,. "  ....:.. 00 "1 ...c "'. .. .... I I,. 400f .-" -... -, \ .., \\ , , r t\ \!' .., .' ....IrJ .' "', .-   1\ <::> ."". " \, , \ \ ." ":. .l(1  _  v ... '-....>- tV v  }  ......'11  .' ( .   'J L   t.  t.    --. 'J,  - .. 1\ . «-' r-  .. ...  - -. ,; 4.  .  r <)  .. \ 00 .... ...", . 0  "- ,- . ? - I " ,  - ..... . I     'I. ta:) \ \' , c.;, \1' . 0:  . ,,\. . \1' Q 0" .... .. -II .... Finding water You can use birds and insects to lead you to water. Most grain - eating birds (such as finc- hes and pigeons). animals, and flies are signs that water is near. A group of climbing a tree may be hea- ding towards a small pool of water. Make sure they don't bite you. Collecting water Rainwater To catch the maximum amount of rainwa- ter, lean a waterproof container under a tree. Extra water will run down the trunk and into the container. Ice or snow Thinly spread ice or snow on a sheet of plastic (preferably black, as this absorbs the heat). Arrange the plastic to catch the water as it melts. Keeping warm Clothes When dressing for cold conditions remember: - Clean are warmer than dirty ones. - Layers of clothes are the best protection against cold. They trap air next to your body and between clothes: this air is kept still and warm, acting as an insulator. The more layers you wear, the warmer you will be. WORDLIST climb [klaim] - 3A. non3TVI collect lkg'lekt] - co6V1paTb condition [kgn'dif( g )n] - YCllOBVIe dress - OAeBaTbC environment [in'vaiJr( g )nmdnt] - 0KPY>J<atOL.L¥ls:I cpeACl finch [fintf] - 36J1V1K fly [flail - Myxa grain [grein] - 3epHo heat [hi:t] - Tenno insect ['insekt] - HaCPKOMoe insulator [.insju'leitg] - Vl301lTOp 1m ImIID layer [lIe id] - cnoLlt lead [li:d] (led, led) - seCTVI, npVlseCTVI melt - TaSHb pigeon ['pict5in] - r01ly6b remember [ri'membJ] - nOMHVlTb sheet Ui:t] - J1CT tip - COBeT trap [trrep] - 3a.nep)f(VlBaTb trunk ['trAI)k] - )f(eJ106 waterproof container l'w=:>:tdpru:f kdn'teinJ] - BOAoHenpOHiI1u.aeMbli1 KOHTei1Hep 
Positioning your camp Generally, the lower the camp, the warmer and more sheltered it will be. Check that there is no danger from above, tor example bees' nests, falling rocks or dead wood. If possible, camp near water and a supply of wood. Keep away from solitary trees, as these attract lightning. Don't camp too close to water - you are likely to be bitten by insects. Your camp should be easily visible to potential rescue parties.  j! \. I' \  \ Y I ... " .' ,. -c:::.- -:.. ----.. . .-. .. ..... -- "" . (.  . '\:  ;:/ l , '- - k  I! . ,,":) - "'( "/ Weather wisdom A long time ago when people lived mostly out-at-doors, they were close to nature. They noticed that when plants, insects, and birds sensed the coming storm they looked for shelter. When ancient people saw animals seeking shel- ter, they did it too. Of course, plants and animals do not actually forecast weather, but they are good weather indicators. Some people watch ants for weather clues. Anytime you see ants building huge mounds around their holes, they prepare for rain. About two hours befo- re rain, all kinds ot ants begin building dams around the ant hill. These mo- unds, which are sometimes several inches in height, prevent rainwater from running into the ant hills. Bees give weather clues, too. They are usually active several hours betore rain, but as the humidity increases, they return to their hives. Some American Indians say that WORDLIST actually ['rektjgli] - 4>aKT4ecKVI Ha caMOM Aene ancient ['einf(g)nt] - ApeBHVli1 ant [rent] - Mypasei1 bee [bi:] - n4ena close to [klgus] - OKono, 6nVl3Ko clue [klu:] - Kll104 (K pa3raAKe) forecast ['f:ka:st] (forecast, forecasted) - npeA- CKa3blBaTb hive [haiv] - ynei1 huge [hju:ctsJ - orpoMHbli1 humidity [hju:'miditi] - Bna)f(HOCTb inch [inUl - AtOi1M increase [in'kri:s] - B03paCTaTb, YBellVl4V1SdTbC51 indicator (.indi'keitg] - it1HAVIKaTop insect ['insekt] - HaceKOMoe look for [luk] - VlCKaTb mostly ['m;}ustli] - rllaBHblM 06pa30M mound [maund] - XOllM, HaCblnb nature ['neitfg] - npVlpOAa plant [pla:nt] - paCTeHVle prepare [pri'pEg J - rOTOBVlTbC51 prevent [pri'vent] - npeAoxpaH51Tb rainwater ['rein'w:tg] - AO)f(AeBa51 BOAa sense ['sensJ - 4yscTsosaTb shelter ['feltg] - KpOB, YKpblTit1e Unit 6 om 
the longer the increased activity lasts, the longer the rain will be. Other insects are also good humidity indi- cators. Butterflies usually fly from flower to flower all day long. When they suddenly di- sappear and can be found hiding on tree trunks or on the underside of leaves, they are seeking shelter to protect their fragile wings from a hard rainfall. Plants are also handy humidity indicators. They are affected in different ways. Just be- fore rain many flowers - like daisy, dandelion and tulip - close their blossoms. Normally, spiders know that insects will be easier to catch when the humi- dity is high. The moisture in the air soaks the insects' wings, making it difficult for them to fly. An old saying warns: When spiders take in their net, The ground will soon be wet. Some people are very sensitive to humidity. People who have arthritis are, in a sense, "living hydrometers". That is why many older people say, "It's going to rain. I can feel it by my bones." They actually can. By learning to read weather signs, you can get a few hours advance war- ning of a storm. It may keep you from getting your new shoes ruined in the rain, from having a family picnic spoiled, or your garden beaten down by a storm. If you are backpacking, camping, boating or doing similar outdoor ac- tivities it might even save your life. : .. c ..... . .. .- ..- ; .".-. ........ \ . , . . )i . . .. . .11 . : : , .' "'\..- . .  ......:\ , ',:.\ ---. '.-:. ;/y . , Our dear, dear animals Perhaps the British are too good to their pets, but more interesting is a recent theory amongst psychologists that pets are very good for us. The basic meaning of "pet" is an animal we keep for emotional rather than economic reasons. A pet animal is kept as a companion, and we all need compa- nions to keep us feeling happy. But pets offer us more than mere companionship; WORDLIST activity (rek'tiviti] - Ae5lTeJ1bHOCTb, 3aH5ITVle advance warning (ad'va: ns Iw:n i IJ]- 3a6Jlaro- BpeMeHHoe npeAynpe)I(AeHVle amongst (a1mA1)st], among [a'mA1)] - cpeAVI, Me)I(AY arthritis [a: '8raitis] - apTpVlT backpacking ['brekprekiI)] - XOAVlTb B nOXOA C plOK3aKoM boating ['bautit)] - KaTaTbC51 Ha JlOAKf bone [baun] - KOCTb butterfly ['bAtf1ai] - 6a60YKa camping ['krempil)] - VlATLt1 B nOXOA C HOyeBKoi1 close their blossoms - 3A. (u.BeTbl) 3aKpb1Ba1OTC5I daisy ['deizi] - MaprapTKa dandelion ['drendilaidn] - oAYBaHYVlK disappear Ldisa'pia] - VlCye3aTb fragile wing ['frrecBail wil)] - xpynKoe KpblJ10 hide [haid] (hid, hidden) - np5lTaTbC5I in a sense [sens] - B Vl3BeCTHOM CMblCJle 134 Unit. last [la:st] - AIlVlTbC5I, npOAOJ1>KaTbC5I mere ['mid] - npocToi1 moisture ('misijg] - BJlara perhaps [pa'hreps] - B03MO>KHO pet [pet] - J1106V1Meu. picnic ['piknik] - n&.1KHVlK protect [prd'tekt] - 3aLltVlTVlTb recent ['ri:snt] - cOBpeMeHHbli1 sensitive ('sensitiv] - YYBcTBVlTeJlbHbli1 sign [sain] - 3HaK, CVlMBOJl similar ['sinlila] - nOA06Hbl soak [sauk] - nponVlTbiBaTb, BnTbiBaTb spider ['spaidd] - naYK spoil [spi1] - nOpTLt1Tb storm [st:):m] - rp03a trunk ['t r Al)k] - CTBOJ1 tulip ['tju:lip] - TIOJ1bnaH underside rAnda'said] - 06palHa51 cTopoHa warn [w:n] - npeAynpe>KAaTb 
they invite us to love and be loved. Many owners feel their pets understand them, for animals are quick to sense anger and sorrow. Often a cat or dog can comfort us at times when human words don't help. We feel loved, too, by the way pets depend on us for a home, for food and drink. Dogs especially look up to their ow- ners, which makes them feel important and needed. A pet can be something different to each member of the family, another baby to the mother, a sister or brother to an only child, a grandchild to the elderly, but for all of us pets provide pleasure and companionship. It has even been suggested that tiny pets should be sent as companions to astronauts on spaceships, to help reduce the stress and loneliness of space flights. In this Plastic Age, when most of us live in large cities, pets are particularly important for children. Learning to care for a pet helps a child to grow up into a loving adult who feels responsible towards those dependent on him. Rightly we teach children to be good to their pets. They should learn, too, that pets are good for us, human beings. 1. 06bS1cHTe, nO)l(anYCTa, TO 03Ha'faeT <l>P 33 "pets are ood for us ..." "- -..[::.'" i i , i\ \ \ ( ! '-¥.,j f j -.J "..,.  , ((. \\ \ J \. .. ,',  <h' \O''-  "" .." ,,'- ." .,...r; -,... ,,'" . ..' ,,--.--.. , . - -, WORDLIST adult ['redAlt] - B3pOCJlbrilt, cOBepWeHHOJleTHLt1i1t affection ['fekf( ) n] - Jlt060Bb, npVlB5J3aHHOCTb anger ['re1)g] - rHeB beaver ['bi:v] - 606p chimpanzee Ltfimpn'zi:] - WVlMnaH3e debate [di'beit] - 06cY)KJ].aTb; AVicKyrVlpoBaTb, cnopVlTb elephant ['elifnt] - CJlOH especially [is'pef( ) Ii] - oco6eHHo gorilla ['gg'riIg] - roplt1J1Jla The ten most intelligent animals Do animals think, or do they act merely from instinct? These questions have been debated by many people. Dr. Blair has worked with animals for many years. What does he think? "It is my judgement that all animals think," said Dr. Blair, formerly director of the New York Zoological Park, who has spent many years as a companion of animals. "When we see animals showing affection, sympathy, jealousy or anger, can we doubt that there are thoughts accompa- nying these feelings?" Dr. Blair believes that the ten most intelligent animals are: 1) the chimpanzee 2) the orang-utan 3) the elephant 4) the gorilla 5) the dog 6) the beaver 7) the horse 8) the sea lion 9) the bear 10) the cat jealousy ['ct)el gsi] - peBHOCTb judgement ['ctAct)mnt] - 3A. cY>KAeHVle, MHeHe merely ['migIi] - TOJlbKO orang-utan [':xrre1)'u:tren] - opaHrYTaH owner ['gun] - BJlaAeJleu, X035JVlH particularly [pg'tikjuldJi] - OyeHb, oc06eHHo reduce [ri'dju:s 1 - YMeHbwaTb, nOHVI>KaTb responsible [ris'pJnsdbl] - oTBeTcTBeHHbli1 sorrow ['sJru] - neyaJlb, cKop6b tiny ['taini] - OyeHb MaJleHbKVli1, KpOWeYHblllt Unit 6 &m 
The chimpanzee "Ellen, our female chimpanzee from Africa," said Dr. Blair, ulearned to put on a sweater which she pulls on over her head. She can sit at the table, and eat food with a fork like any other eight-year-old. "Several years ago we had a chimpanzee that could sew." A chimpanzee, seeing a banana hung on a string outside its ca"ge, pic- ked up a rod and tried to reach the fruit. Failing with the short rod, he found another one which could be fitted into the first. (The rods had been put in his cage for the purpose.) By lengthening the tool, he got the banana. The elephant "The elephant is the philosopher of the animal kingdom," Dr. Blair continued. "No other creature is so powerful or so difficult to capture. Yet none so promptly seems to realize man's superiority or so quickly learns that the wisest course is to accept captivity and make the best of it. [Among dogs, horses, lions and tigers, only an exceptional one can be highly trained, and that usually when he is young.] An elephant seems never too old to learn, and every elephant is a star. n On a cold night at the zoo, several of the elephants always shut the door after they go into their house, without waiting for the keeper to do it. In summer they leave the door open. One of the Indian elephants stores away peanuts on Sunday, when visitors are numerous, and eats them on Monday, when there are few visitors. Again and again the truth that an elephant never forgets has been shown at the zoo. One example was that of a messenger boy to whom an elephant na- med Gunda took a deep dislike. Every time he saw the boy, he tried to strike him. After the messenger left the job at the zoo, three years passed before he dropped in for a visit. When Gunda saw him, he raised his trunk as if to strike. Thus he showed that he remembered his hatred for the boy. The bear Ivan, a big Alaskan brown bear, was a natural clown. He seemed to take delight in standing directly under the sign, "Don't feed the bears - pe- nalty $10 fine. n There he would beg for food - and always get it. The cat Cats appeared in ancient Egypt, where wild cats were tamed and trained to catch the rats and the mice. "We may make a mistake," admitted Dr. Blair, "in thinking that friendliness is a sign of intelligence. Take the house cat, for example. The cat is extremely intelligent, but it is always its own master and lives its own life." WORDLIST blow [blu] (blew, blown) - Ayrb cage [keicB] - KneTKa captivity [krep'tiviti] - nneH capture ['krepU] - 3aXBaTVlTb, B3Tb B nneH drop in - 3arnHyrb fail [feil] - TepneTb HeYAay fit [fit] - npll1cnOCa6JlVlBaTb, COOTBeTCTBOBaTb, nOAXOAVlTb friendliness ['frendlinis] - APY>Kent06l11e gently ['<tentli] - He)f(HO, OCTOpO)f(HO hang [hrelJ] (hung, hung) - BViceTb kingdom ['kil)dm] - KoponeBCTBO . Ii. lengthen ['lelJe(- )n] - YAJlVlHTb messenger - nOCblJlbHbl peanut ['pi:nAt] - 3eMnHo opex, apaxlI1c promptly ['prmptli] - 6bICTPO, TOHO, pOBHO rod [rd] - nPYT, nanKa sign [sain) - BbIBeCKa string [stril)] - BepeBKa superiority [su:,pigri'riti] - npeBOCXOACTBO tip [tip] - KOH1t1K tool [tu:l] - VlHCTPYMeHT trunk ['trAI)k] - X060T 
Sea lions Sea lions, too, have excellent memories and can be trained quickly. Their tameness, their eagerness to learn and their ability to imitate rate them above the more slow-minded bear. Bears like an audience and will perform the most difficult and clownish stunts for no other reward than the applause of the crowd. But the sea lion demands a fish or some other tasty reward. Who was Laika? People first heard about Laika in 1957. On November 3 of that year, Russia sent a satellite into space. It was called Sputnik 2. The world's first space tra- veller was on board. She was a dog named Laika, which means "barker". Until Sputnik 2 went up, no one knew what would happen to living things in space. Could animals live there? Could people travel safely in spaceships? What dangers would there be in space? Laika's trip answered many of these questions. For seven days the dog circled the earth. She lived in a special cabin that was kept cool for her. She got food the same way she had been trained to get it on earth. The dog was well and happy. She showed people on earth that animals could live in space. Maybe men and women could, too. The Russians did not know how to bring Laika back to earth. She died in space. She gave her life so that people could learn about safe space travel. And people have not forgotten her. Laika's spaceship is sometimes called Sputnik 2. 2. Explain the main idea of this sentence using the paragraph. 1) We heard about Laika in 1957. 2) Laika's trip answered many scientific questions. 3) Animals could live in space. 4) People have not forgotten Laika. 3. BblnMwMTe cYl1.\eCTBMTenbHble c npeAnorOM M KpaTKO nepeCKa- >KMTe TeKCT. 4. BblnMwMTe BonpocMTenbHble npeAJ10>KeHMSI M KpaTKo nepecKa- >KMTe TeKCT. 5. BblnMwMTe rnaronbl B Past Simple M KpaTKO nepeCKa>KMTe TeKCT. 6. BblnMwMTe CY1l.\eCTBMTenbHble, nepeA KOTOpblMM HeT apTKnSl, M KpaTKO nepeCKa>KMTe TeKCT. 7. Let's discuss the text. 1) Did you know about this fact before? 2) Why had people sent a dog before they went into space themselves? 3) The results were very promising, weren't they? WORDLIST barker ['bo: kd] - natOLl.taS1 c06aKa board [b:d] - 60PT cabin ['krebin]- Ka6V1Ha circle the earth ['sd:kl oi: a:8] - CAeJ1aTb BTOK BOKpyr 3eMJlVl cool [ku:l] - npoxnaAHbli1 safe [seif] - 6e30nacHbli1 satellite ['sret alait] - cnYTHLt1K space ['spe is] - KOCMOC spaceship ['speisJip] - KOCMVlyeCKVli1 Kopa6J1b train [trein] - TpeHpOBaTbC trip [trip] - nyrewecTBVle · 137 
. , .   f)  ,'( ;; --- A gaggle of geese Large flocks of wild geese migrate south for the winter and north for the summer. Sometimes geese will form small gro- ups within the flock. These groups are called gaggles. Even after a long journey a group of geese seems full of energy. They are always squabbling and honking and flapping their wings. In fact, they are in top physical condition before, during, and after migration. This is due to their energy-saving system of flying in drafts. The leader of the flock breaks the trail through the air as the rest of the geese follow in the shape of a V. Each goose, flying a little to the side and rear of the goose ahead of it, is sucked along in the V-shaped draft of air caused by the geese in front. This "drafting" allows the geese to travel at an easy pace all through their long migration. The blue whale Why is the world's mightiest animal in danger? The blue whale is the largest animal that has ever lived. A fully grown one can be more than 1 00 feet long. That's longer than three school buses parked bumper to bumper. Just the tongue of a blue whale is larger than a car. The huge creature may weigh up to 180 tons. The Blue whale is also the strongest of the earth's creatures. Although they are the world's biggest and strongest creatures, blue whales are in danger. Just 150 year ago, there were over 150,000 of them in the world's seas. Today there are only about 600 to 3,000. Why? For years, the blue whale was a prize catch for whalers. Its huge body contains more than 20 tons of valuable oil. Thousands of blue whales were killed each year. Before long, fewer and fewer of the giant creatures were sighted. The blue whale was dying out. In 1965, whaling countries agreed to stop killing blue whales. Even so, some are still accidentally killed by whalers. Others died from sickness and old WORDLIST allow ['lau] - n03B0J1s:1Tb be in top physical condition [tp'fizikl kJn'diI()n] - 6blTb B npeKpacHo <popMe creature ['kri:U"] - cyecTBo draft of air caused by the geese in front - Ts:lra B03- Ayxa, npoVl3BOAMas:l ryCs:lMVI, J1eT51VlMtt1 BnepeAVI due to [dju:] - 611aroAaps:J dying [daiil)]- BbIMVlpatOVli1 energy ['encBi] - SHeprVls:l, CVllla energy-saving ['encBi seivilJ] - c6eperalOLllas:l CVllla, SHeprtt1s:1 few [fju:] - MallO flap - MaxaTb (Kpblllbs:lM) flock [flJk] - CTas:l fully ['fuli] - cOBepweHHo, BnOllHe gaggle [gregl] - CTas:l (ryce) giant r'ct3ai gnt] - rtt1raHTcKVlV1 goose [gu:s] - rycb, MH....,. geese [gi:z] - rycVI grown ['grun] - B3pOCllbli1 honk [hJI)k] - Kptt1yaTb (0 AVlKVlX ryCs:lx) mJ Unit 6 huge [hju:cB] - orpoMHbl in fact [frekt] - Ha caMOM Aelle in shape of [,Ieip] - B <popMe journey [,<t:ni] - nyTewecTBVle migrate [mai'greit] - MVlrpVlpOBaTb (0 nTVluax) migration [Inai'greiI(  )n] - nepelleT (nTVlU) pace [peis] - CKOpOCTb, TeMn prize [praiz] - npVl3 rear [ri ] - n03aAVI sickness ['siknis] - 6011e3Hb sight [sait] - YBVlAeTb squabble [skwbl] - CCOpVlTbCs:I suck [sAk] - 3acaCblBaTb tongue [tAt)] - s:l3b1K trail [treil] - Tpona valuable ['vreljubl] - ueHHbl whale [weil] - KVlT whaler ['weil] - Ktt1T060 wing ['wit)] - KpblJ10 within [wi'oin] - BHYTPVl, B npeAenax 
age. Soon there may not be enough baby blue whales to replace all the ones that die. Because of human greed, the mightiest creature that ever lived may one day disappear. Buddy and me Buddy is my best friend. He never gets mad at me. He never runs off to play with another boy. He always listens when I need someone to talk to. When he sees me, his big brown eyes are sweet as a smile. But Buddy is more than my friend. He's my arms and legs. He helps me do things I can't do by myself. I can't do a lot of things other kids can. I have a disease that makes my muscles weak. It's called muscular dystrophy. Before Buddy, Mom and Dad helped me. Mike and other friends helped too. But friends sometimes get tired of helping, and I wanted to do things on my own. Buddy was my wish come true. We met at a camp where Buddy was trained to help someone like me. As a puppy, he was special. Loving and smart, he was chosen to. be a Ser- vice Dog. Buddy was the star of puppy kindergarten. Top dog in his graduation class. In -two years, Buddy had learned sixty commands. I had to learn all the commands in WlO weeks. How to take care of Buddy, too. It was hard. Much harder than I thought. We worked long hours and had tests every day. Over and over I practiced giving com- mands. It wasn't easy to make Buddy obey me. He acted like a kid who didn't pay any attention to his teacher. . Many times I got angry. Sometimes I cri- ed. But I never gave up, even when I wan- ted to. To help us feel that we belonged toget- her, Buddy was leashed to my wrist all day and night. We had to do everything together. We slept together. We even took showers to- gether! itkDt, \, '1; II.,.. . ) / ,\- ; t (\ '; . " I.: .;. . . (,.J . ,', \t/ " '-:,,y '. ! t f I': I,\   j., .,'." /\' {tj"I  "I'"' \ ".." : \ .1: il\ti. '. .. " !i;'-.,.;'..\V- '. ,... ;i'k' .-'"'IIIU 'f'\" --,,\\IJ!\--, \:... ..t.'11 ... ,.'it\y  .. "-- ,'"'....... '.' tt] WORDLIST accidentally [.reksi'dent;)li] - CJ1yai1Ho act ['rekt] - AellO, nocTynoK angry ('relJgri) - cepAVITbli1 attention [;)Itenf(  )n] - BHLt1MaHli1e be special ['spef( )1] - OTJ1V1aTbCSJ OT Bcex belong together - npVlHaAlle>KaTb APyr APyry Buddy was my wish come true.- 6a)JJJ.VI 6b1J1 Moei1 MeToi1, KOTopaSJ oCYLLlecTBVlJ1acb. disappear [.dis'pi] - li1Ce3aTb disease [di'zi:z] - 6011e3Hb dystrophy ['distrfi] - AVlCTpOcpli1 get mad - Bbli1Tli1 Vl3 ce6>t, paCCepALt1TbCSJ give up - 3A. CAaBaTbCSJ greed ['gri:d] - >KC!AHOCTb hard [ha:d] - TPYAHO, TSJ>KellO kindergarten ['kind,ga:tn] - AeTcKVli1 caA leash [li:n - npli1BSJ3b look like [luk laik] - 6blTb nOXO>Kli1M mighty ['maiti] - MOLLlHbl, rpoMaAHbI muscles ['mAslz] - MblWU.bl obey ['bei] - nOAit1HTbCSJ, cllywaTbCSJ puppy ['pApi] - LLleHOK replace [ri'pJeis] - 3aMeHli1Tb smart [sma:t) - CMbIWJ1eHbl take shower - npLt1HLt1MaTb AYW tired ['taid] - YCTallbli1, li13MY"leHHbli1 top [tp] - 3A. J1ywlt1i1 train [trein] - ApeCCli1pOBaTb wrist [rist] - 3anSJCTbe I!1mD 1m 
Sport -- . . . . . "" .... . . . ... ..;....  " ., , ( , LL & . , \ -.. a , .-- ), . , J - --- ... ... . - -"" -- Basketball Basketball is a very popular game in America The official basketball season is usually during the winter, but it is a game which can be played at any time of the year. Basketball is played on a court. The game is played with a large ball about 30 inches in circumference. A team is made up of five players. In the United States teams compete in basketball at many le- vels. There is a professional league called the National Basketball Association (NBA), primary and secondary schools and universiti- es compete against each other, and in many towns there are 10- calleagues in which anyone who wishes to may play on a team. Basketball is also a popular spectator sport. Many Americans watch basketball games in arenas and on television. Basketball is a very fun game which can be played formal- ly, in a league, or casually, just for enjoyment. It is easy to organize a game wherever there is a court, and many Ameri- cans playa lot of basketball for exercise and recreation. 8. Read and try to make a back translation. My sister taught me to score Soccer is my favorite sport, and I have been playing for nine years. I love to play all sports, but I play only soccer and basketball in a league. I have a sister Elizabeth. She is 15. She plays soccer too. She has been playing for 10 years. I wasn't very good at first. I was about 6 at the time. My sister was naturally good and she scored a lot for her team. My sister started to teach me the fun- damentals. Elizabeth taught me how to pass. Soon I could do it with my eyes shut. She started to teach me moves to get around another guy. I practiced a lot by myself, with Elizabeth, and at team practices. Elizabeth then taught me how to shoot. One day there was a game. I was not good enough that day and we lost the game. I was so mad, I went home and practiced and practiced without a break. I almost fainted. Elizabeth and I were both disappointed. We began to practice again, especially how to trap, pass and shoot. I didn't want the same thing to happen to me again. Gradually, I became a very good soccer player. I almost always make the right decisions now. Soccer is a mental game as well. WORDLIST basketball ['ba:skit,b:l] - 6acKeT60n break [breik] - nepepblB circumference [s'kAmf(  )rns] - OKPY)KHOCTb decision [di'si3()n] - peweHVle disappoint Ldis'pint] - pa30yapOBbiBaTb disappointed LdisJ'pintid] - pa30YapOBaHHbl, OrOpYeHHbl faint ['feint] - Tep5Hb C03HaHVle fundamental LfAnd'mentl] - OCHOBbl gradually ['grredjli] - nOCTeneHHO happen ['hrep(  )n] - np0t-1CXOALt1Tbj cnyyaTbC5I league [li:g] - JlVlra lose [lu:z] (lost, lost) - npOVlrpblBaTb mad [mred] - paCCep)KeHHbl 1m I!ImD mental ['mentl] - YMcTBeHHbl move [mu:v] - ABVI)KeHe National Basketball Association - Hau.oHaJlbHa51 6aCKeT60JlbHa51 accou.Vlau.51 pass [pa:s] - nepeAaBaTb, naCOBaTb recreation Lrekri'eif()n] -OTAbIX, BOCCTaHOBJle- HVie CVlJl, pa3BJleyeHVle score [skJ:] - BblLt1rpbIBaTb, 3a6t.1BaTb M5IYVI shoot Uu:t] (shot, shot) - nOCblJlaTb M5IY, 6V1Tb no BopOTaM soccer ['sk] - CPYT60Jl spectator (spek'teit] - 3pVlTenb teach (ti:U] (taught, taught) - YYVlTb team (ti:m] - KOMaHAa 
 ..... ....  g     AnI 'el, 11'0 IOIieT Sun. 6D" I think I'm a very lucky person to have such a wonderful sister who can teach me so many things about soccer. 9. Answer the questions, please. 1) Who is the main hero of the story? 2) Who taught him to score? 3) How did they practice? 4) What made him a good soccer player? 5) Why does he consider himself a lucky person? MOH ceCTpa HaY"lMna MeHH BblMrpblBaTb $yr6011- MOM 11t06MbIM BA CnOpTa. s:f !t1rpatO B Hero 911eT. 51 11 to 611 to 3aH!t1MaTbC BCeM!t1 BAaM!t1 cnopTa, HO B l1!t1re 5t !t1rpatO T011bKO B cPyr6011 !t1 6acKeT6011. Y MeH eCTb ceCTpa 311!t13a6eT. EM 15 11eT. OHa TO)t(e !t1rpaeT B cDyr6011. OHa lt1rpaeT B Te4eHlt1e 10 11eT. nOHa4a11Y Y MeH He Bce n011Y4a110Cb. B TO BpeM MHe 6bl110 OKono 611eT. Cecrpa AeMCTBtI1TenbHO xopowo !t1rpana, 1-1 OHa nptl1HOC!t111a MHoro OLIKOB CBOe KOMaH)J.e. Mo ceCTpa Ha4ana Y4L-1Tb MeH OCHOBaM. 311tl13a6eT Y4L-111a MeH, KaK naCOBaTb. BCKope 5t Mor AenaTb 3TO C 3aKpblTblML-1 rna3aM!t1. OHa Ha4ana Y4L-1Tb MeH ABtI1>KeHtI1- M, KaK 060MT1-1 APyroro !t1rpOKa. s:J MHoro TpeH!t1pOBanC caM, C 3ntl13a6eT L-1 - B KOMaHAe. nOTOM 3n!t13a6er Y4!t1na MeH, KaK HY>KHO 6!t1Tb no BopOTaM. OAHa>K.LJ.bl 6blna L-1rpa. 51 6bln HeAOCTaT04HO C1-1neH B TOT AeHb, !t1 Mbl np01-1rpantl1.  6blll TaK paccep- >KeH, 4TO nowe11 AOMOM 1-1 TpeH1-1pOBanC, TpeHL-1pOBaJlC 6e3 nepepblBa.  n04TtI1 Te- pl1 C03HaHtI1e. 3nlt13a6eT !t1  6blIltl1 orop4eHbl. Mbl Ha4aJl!t1 TpeH!t1pOBaTbC CHOBa, oco6eHHO pa- 60Tan!t1 HaA TeM, KaK 3aXBaTb1BaTb, naCOBaTb !t1 3a6t11BaTb M4.  He XOTe11, 4To6bl nOAo6Hoe cnY4!t1nOCb CO MHOM CHOBa. nOCTeneHHO 5t CTan 04eHb XOPOW!t1M cPyr6o- ntl1CTOM. CeM4ac 5t n04TL-1 BcerAa npL-1H!t1MatO BepHble peWeHtI1. B <pYT6one HaAO YMeTb AYMaTb.  AYMatO,  04eHb CLlaCTIl1-1BbIM 4enOBeK, nOTOMY 4TO Y MeH eCTb TaKa5t 3aMeLla- TenbHa ceCTpa, KOTopa MO)f(eT HaY41-1Tb MeH MHorOMY B <pyr6one. The origins of soccer There are lots of stories about how soccer-like games have been played all over the world and at different times in history. About 10,000 years ago Romans played ball games, they played for exer- cise. CD <5)  "" "'\ \ "' , I ,,.,; \ ,\. ... ". . . . \- r.," - --- .) WORDLIST different ['dif(d)rdnt] - pa3nVlHbli1 exercise ['eksdsaiz] - TpeHVlpOBKa, cpVl33apAKa game [geim] - rpa history ['hist (d) ri] - CTOpVl5J lucky ['IAki] - CaCTJlVlBbli1 Roman ['rdUJTIdn] - pVlMJ1HVlH world ['wd:ld] - MVip Unit 6 141 
I tcEY Britain was invaded by Rome, and the game - playing Roman soldiers probably brought soccerlike games with them and may have introduced them to people living in Britain. In any case, football was played in Britain for over 1,000 years. Many kings and queens tried to ban it because football took time away from soldierly activities, such as archery. Despite being illegal in Britain until the 18th century, the English created rules for the game in 1863. The Pilgrims could have been met on the beach at Plymouth by soccer- playing American Indians! By the time the Pilgrims arrived in 1620, Indians in New England had been playing a game called, "gather to play football", for a while. This game looked a lot like modern soccer: it was played entirely with the legs and the feet, and the object was to cross the opponent's goal line with the ball. The ball, however was small, about 2 to 4 inches in diameter, and was made of wood, or deerskin stuffed with leaves. In 1634 English set- tlers wrote about the game, which reminded them of English football, and noted that play could involve anywhere from 30 to 1,000 players on a mile- long field! npOMcxoeHMe yr6ona CYUJ.ecT8yeT MHoro paCCKa308 0 TOM, KaK B pa3Hbie nepOAbl It1CTOp1t1 80 MHOrlt1X CTpaHax It1rpaIlIt1 8 It1rpbl, HanOMIt1HatOL.U.lt1e COBpeMeHHbl£1 <pyT6011. OKOllO 1 0 TblCfI fleT Ha3aA plt1MflHe It1rpaIlIt1 C M'-IOM, HO AellaIlL-1 3TO AJlf! <p1t13L-1eCK0£1 3apfiAKIt1. 6p1t1TaHIt1f1 nOABeprIlaCb BTOp)KeHlt1tO plt1Mlls:lH, 1t1, BepOfiTHO, plt1MCKlt1e COIlAa- Tbl-lt1rpOK, nplltHeCfI C c060£1 TO-TO nOXO)Kee Ha <PYT60Il. n03HaKOMIt1Illt1 C 3TO It1rpo >KIt1Tefle 6p1t1TaHIt1It1. 80 8Cs:lKOM cJ1yae B <pyr60Il B 6plt1TaHIt11t1 It1rpatOT 60- llee 1000 lleT. MHorlt1e KOpOIlIt1 It1 KOpOJ1eBbl nblTalllt1Cb 3anpeTIt1Tb ero, nOToMY TO <pyT6011 OTB11eKaJ1 OT 80lt1HCKIt1X 3aHTIt1£1, TaKIt1X, KaK cTpellb6a 1t13 J1YKa. HecMoTps:l Ha TO, '-ITO <PYT60J1 8 6plt1TaHIt11t1 6blJ1 AO XVIII BeKa BHe 3aKoHa, aH- rIlIt1aHe 8 1863 r. pa3pa60Tafllt1 npa81t1J1a It1rpbl. AMeplt1KaHCKlt1e It1HAe£1u.bl, It1rpatOUJ.lt1e 8 <pYT60J1 Ha MOpCKOM n06epe>Kbe 803118 nlllt1MYTa, MOrIlIt1 8CTpeTIt1Tb nlt1J1lt1rpIt1M08. KorAa B 1620 r. nlt1Illt1rplt1Mbl nplt1nIlblIlIt1, It1HAe£1u.bl B H080£1 AHr11lt1lt1 e 8 TeeHlt1e KaKorO-TO 8peMeHlt1 It1rpaIllt1 8 It1rpy, KO- TOpas:l Ha3bl8aIlaCb «c06paTbCs:I nOlt1rpaTb B <pyT60J1». 3Ta It1rpa 6blIla O'-leHb noxo- WORDLIST activity [eek'tiviti] - Aes:neflbHOCTb, 3A. ynpa>KHe- HVie archery ['a:ij(  )ri] - cTpellb6a 3 J1YKa arrive [g'raiv] - np6blBaTb ban [been] - 3anpeaTb beach [bi:U) - MOpCKOi1 6eper bring [bril)] (brought, brought) - npHOCVlTb century ['senijuri] - BeK, CrOJleTe create [kri:'eit] - C03AaTb deerskin ['di'skin]- KO)Ka (wKYpa) OJ1eH despite [dis'pait] - HeCMOTp Ha diameter [dai'remitg) - AViaMeTp for a while [wail] - B TeeHVle KaKorO-TO BpeMeHLt1 gather ['greo] - 3A. c06V1paTbc however [Qau1evJ] - TeM He MeHee, OAHaKO illegal [i'li:g( J )1] - He3aKoHHbl£1 in any case [keis] - BO BCKOM B cllyae inch [intfJ - AIO£1M introduce LintrJ'dju:s] - npeACTaBJlTb, 3HaKO- MLt1Tb 1m Unit 6 invade [in'veid] - BToprarbC involve [in'v:>Iv] - BOBlleKaTb king [kilJ] - KOpOllb leaf [I i:f] - llViCT modern ['m:>dn] - cOBpeMeHHbll1 Plymouth ['plimJ8] - nJlVlMYT probably ['pr3bdbli] - BepOTHO queen [kwi:n] - KOpOJ1eBa remind [ri'maind] - HanOMHarb Rome [rJum] - r. PM rule [ru:]] - npaBVIllO settler ['setId] - nocelleHeu. soldier ['sguIQ)] - COllAar, BOH soldierly ['sJlllQ)Jli] - BOHCKVlVI stuff [stAf] - Ha6V1Barb the Pilgrims ['pilgrims] - nVlJlVlrpVlMbl (aHrll. KOllOHVlCTbl, nOCeJ1V1BWeC B AMepVlKe B 1620 r.) until [An'til] - AO rex nop, nOKa wood [wud] - AepeBO (MaTepVlall) 
)l(a Ha COBpeMeHHblC1 cpyr60n: B Hee Lt1rpan TonbKO HOraMLt1,  rpOK AOn)l(eH 6bln nepeCeYb C MYOM 111l1Hlt11O nOll npOTBHlt1Ka. My, OAHaKO, 6blll ManeHbK1I1M, OKO- no 2-4 AIOC1MOB B AaMeTpe.  6blll CAellaH 1113 AepeBa Lt111Lt1 oneHbeC1 WKYPbl, Ha- 6111T0C1 nLt1CTbM1I1. B 1634 r. aHrllLt1C1cKLt1e nOCeneHLJ.bl n1l1CallLt1 06 Lt1rpe, KOTopa HanOMHalla Lt1M aHrIl1l1C1cK1I1C1 <PYT6011, Lt1 OTMeyanLt1, YTO B rpy Morll1l1 1I1rpaTb OT 30 AO 1000 II1rpoKoB, a AJU1Ha nOll Morna COCTaBllTb 1 MII111IO. Floral designer Arranging flowers Sasha's sister's hobby is to grow flowers and to arran- ge them. In Atlanta Sasha met Cheryl Connely. This is what she said: "My name is Cheryl Connely. I am the owner of a floral and gift store in Atlanta, GA, called Favorite Things. It is located in the largest mall in the United States. I started my business 4 years ago making small wre- aths and selling them to individuals. I sold from a pus- hcart and now I am in a large store. I have always loved flowers and enjoyed sharing this love with others. Now I want to share with you how to make a bouquet for your birthday or special occasion. You will need: a vase or container, flowers, greenery, ribbon. Gather the flowers and put in vase." Hobbies '$ , .u ' . , "' -. L '" -,' " - ',' . <;' .:a \ ,_ .;\ ,. "lito \ :J' 'fi · '. ,..{," --' \. '- . .I ' . . ' .( ,t' . . -,I ; ..- . ".'  .. . -- - -  .f f/ ..  .... .."" , : to -. _ ' t:"  . - - ' ). - .: 'i ,  :. .'  '\ : - -. ';--. - \. . "' For Magnolia Arrangement: '. . ,. J 'l <' ---'. """;'*') - _ t , \ '" \ ,'" - ..- -- ,.'" J " ,-' \. .., ", \} --\- , '. - Put design foam on bottom. Cover with Spanish moss. - A ,\,";: .\ _,-(' .'" '"('V I  :;2. j1. (' L-Y. \. J;.. . .. '. .._- ,. - .c. "I .. .....   --=-  -)".- '.  -" - '-"\  '\ .. ..... ..-'j. -/ 4/ -- -, " " Put Magnolias on top ana 4 around. Next add roses (total 8 around Mag). Add blue. Fill in with eucalyptus or greenery. Now you have a beautiful bouquet. WORDLIST Atlanta [Jt'lrentJ]- ATJ1aHTa be located - 6blTb pacnOnO>KeHHblM bouquet ['bukei] - 6YKeT container (kJn'teinJ] - COCYA. Kop06Ka design foam [di'zain fJum] - neHa, K KOTOpOi1 Kpens:lTCs:I UBeTbi eucalyptus [ju:kJ'liptJs] - 3BKaJJnT floral designer [fl:xr( J)1 di'zainJ] - <pi-1TOAVl3a- Hep gift - nOAapoK greenery ['gri:nJri] - 3eJ1eHb, paCTi-1TeJ1bHOCTb individual [.indi'vidjuJI] - 3A. aCTHoe J1V1U.0 Magnolia Arrangement [mreg'neulid J'reinctmdnt] - apaH>KVlpOBKa Vl3 MarHollVli1 mall [m:I, mrel] - ToproBbli1 u.eHTp owner ['JunJ] - BJlaAeneu., X03s:1i-1H pushcart [pufka:(r)t] - TeJ1e>KKa (pYHas:l) rib,bon ['ribJn] - J1eHTa share [fcd] - AeJ1Tb, pa3AeJ1s:1Tb spanish moss ['sprenif ms] - i-1CnaHcKVli1 MOX special occasion ['spef( )I J'kei3( J )n] - oc06b1 cJ1ya wreath [ri:8] - BeHOK, rLt1pJ1stHAa Unit 6 em 
I wish you good luck and enjoy your beautiful flowers. Knowing a few basic principles of flower arranging can help you add beauty and life to your home. When putting flowers on a dining table, keep the flower arrangement rather low, usually below eye level, so that it won't interfere with conversation. Use the following illustrations as guides for flower arranging: .....' (, ,( \.... J -;J... . .. t  It' ,I .! . ::. ( - f, -t ' .., , - - l" l " '" \' .,. )- "'!f;,.' , - 1- t\t *" () ( . At! " ..... 'J \r.. , \' , , }I \ \  ...' ,,. . I  . . ( .... :t. "I i' .. - - "r I , ... ,  -' :r . \ -, Q I - \' I. ...... '\ !1'"  '- "'?' .." _ if\.  --., _' . ./ t ::r;-: ,1' - - ...... . I  '1'" .... ... ".("\;, (" - " ,.- , "  : ., .,: .... "J  - -(... . '. . .. .. t y ... -  .. .... '\,.  ,-: \.... , !--. ::./. . " .: -'  . .. -.,) , .,; t)  , . . ,';'  p,';::  4 l' ," .,./.j ',;.'-(. of: -.. r . . . -' .; ': -. .', -7 . j';' ,:..:-< 'i, -\ ':.  , ...,...'4" '\,,' 1. . . -:-. ,,'J.  I - .,' .:.'" _ '4.. -r-.. ;.'.'" _  I -. _.: ;. '0 . 4 ,. ".. ,"\. "' t\. -. .. .... \ - , I  . . ..,. ," "  \ l-' "IC ,.J , . "  ..., . .I T1t".i Circle '\ oJ Vertical Rectangle \ . Additional Activities \ '" I . - '.J- ... \ " . ... - \ . ......., - '- " \ " \ t.. l Crescent '- =' . f : ,/ ... l . ., t' ' 1 _ .. \(' - .' ,\ . " (. ,"'; ,- ,,," "'  I Triangle Make Christmastime arrangements with pine branches and red carnations. 1m Unit 6 
F . Sports *** Golfer "Absolutely shocking! I've never played so badly before." Caddie "Gh! You have played before, then?" *** Angler "You've been watching me for three hours. Why don't you try fishing yourself?" Onlooker "I have not got the patience." *** "Did you have any luck hunting tigers in India?" "Marvellous luck. Didn't come across a single tiger." *** Boxing instructor (after first lesson) Beginner (dazed) "Now, have you any questions to ask?" "Yes, how much is your corresponden- ce course?" WORDLIST absolutely ['rebs'lu:tli] - a6conIOTHo angler ['reI)gl] - pb160noB-YAVlnb1ll.VlK before [bi'f:] - npe)f(JJ.e, paHbwe, AO Toro come across [kAm 'krs] - HaTOJ1KHYTbC Ha, CJ1yai1Ho BCTpeTTb correspondence course Lkris''pnddns k:s] - Kypc 3aOYHOrO 06yYeHif1 dazed [deizd] - OWenOMJ1eHHbl golfer ['glf] - rpOK B ronb<t> hunt [hAnt] - OXOT1TbC luck [IAk] - YAaa, cllya marvellous ['ma:vls] - 3YMTeJ1bHbli1 onlooker ['n.l uk] - Ha6J1IOAaTeJ1b patience ['peif{:) )ns] - TepneHl-1e shocking [JkiIJJ - B03MyrTel1bHbI, acHbI single [silJgl] - eAMHbI I!ImD mil 
E L ENT Belling the Cat Long ago, the mice held a general council to consider what measures they could take to outwit their common enemy, the Cat. Some said this, and some said that; but at last a young mouse got up and said he had a proposal to make, which he thought could help. "You will all agree," said he, that our chief danger consists in the sly manner in which the enemy approaches us. Now, if 'I we could receive some signal of her approach, we could easily escape from her. I venture, therefore, to propose that a small bell be attached by a ribbon round the neck of the Cat. By this we would always know when she was about, and could easily retire while she was near." This proposal was met with general applause, until an old mouse got up and said: "That is all very well, but who is to bell the Cat?" The mice looked at one another and nobody spoke. Then the old mouse said: "IT IS EASY TO PROPOSE IMPOSSIBLE REMEDIES." I'"'' I_- ( :: * ..,..... .,- -- r )'-1  _ } .". 'X' :.. '. -=:=::::----- '"   1 . · . fJ -\J ---... '... '.: -.......i\:...../ ,I  '-- ' '} 0" ......,. . - " . , - I I,i : . .- . ,,-1..J.;: ,  r:l--Z-. .  - - ,\ -. -;s' 0 (\ .'0. r:- p 00. f'.  .' .J   .. Qt,: 11° 0   lj - (J c,, ""...'  ;.' .  . . .... --3." )} - "- ....../'\. )v I I tI, '\. ----- ,ullfl//t114. ".. T-- \\1IUUII.. " { ) .:.. . T " ..J ..... .......... ....,...', . -.", .-.... .. '. . -:"G  0 A @ @ @ "'-'(II ... (0) / ;-:_: I  li\\llili ,,. - iiIU/":_ - ... \ ..... .:... ' -..  . WORDLIST approach ['pruUl - np611Lt1>KaTbCSl attach ['treUl - npVlKpenJ1S1Tb bell the cat - nOBeCVlTb K0110K0l1bYVlK Ha KOTa chief [iji:f] - rJ1aBHblt1 common ['k:>mn] - 06l1..\Vli1 consider [kn'sid] - peWTb council ['kaunsl] - COBeT danger ['dei nQ)a] - onaCHOCTb escape [is'keip] - y6eraTb impossible [im'p:)sbl] - HeB03MO>KHbli1  measure ['me3] - Mepa neck [nek] - weSl outwit [aut'wit] - nepeXTpi1Tb, npOBeCTVI (Koro- 11V160) proposal [prlpJuz(  )1] - npeA110>KeHLt1e remedy ['remidi] - cpeACTBO, Mepa retire [ri'tai] - 3A. y6eraTb ribbon ['ribn] - J1eHTa therefore roeaf:>:] - nosToMY. CJ1eAOBaTeJ1bHO venture [Iventf] - pcKoBaTb em Unit 6 
The Doctor and Young Living The doctor put away his stethoscope and looked at his friend, Joe, a gara- ge mechanic, who was buttoning his shirt after the examination His hands shook and his face was pale. "Have I got anything, Doc?" he asked. "You certainly have." "Is it serious?" "So you want to know what you have," the doctor said slowly. "For one thing, you have youth. That's pretty serious." "Don't kid me, Doc! What have I got?" "High blood pressure. Don't worry about it. We can get it under control. But tell me - how often do I have you to check my car?" "Gh, once a month, I guess. You drive a lot." "So do you, Joe. You drive yourself a lot. How long has it been since you've had a check-up with me?" "Maybe a couple of years." "My records show that it was exactly six years last June. Don't you think your health is as important as the health of my car?" We have curious attitudes about doctors. We want the doctor badly when we are sick. When we're well, he's usually the last person on earth that we want to see for professional services. We don't like to be reminded that sic- kness can attack us. Remember that a basic factor is your attitude toward yourself. Much of the pattern of your life is determined by your own views in regard to how you think, what you do, how you relate to others. The Discontented Pig After Oscar Wilde Long ago, there was a curly-tailed pig. He lived by himself in a house at the edge of the village, and every day he worked in his garden. Whether the sun shone or the rain fell he dug and weeded his tomatoes and carrots, until word of his fine vegetables travelled through seven countries, and each year he won the royal prize at the fai r. But the time came that Little Pig grew tired of the endless toil. WORDLIST a garage mechanic ['grera:3 mi'krenik] - MexaHVlK B raproKe attitude ['retitju:d] - OTHoweHVle, TO\.lKa 3peHVI blood pressure [blAd 'prefd] - KpOBHoe AaBJ1eHVle button [bAtn] - 3aCTeril1BaTb nyrOBit1u.bl check [U"ek] - npOBepTb couple [kApl] (of years) - napa (J1eT) curious ['kjudri dS] - Jl1060nb1THbli1 curly-tailed ['kd:liteild] - XBOCT KplO\.IKOM determine [di'td:min] - onpeAeJlTb dig (dug, dug) - KonaTb, pblTb discontented ['diskdn'tentid] - HeAOBOJ1bHbl edge [ect)] - Kpa, OKpaVlHa endless ['endlis] - 6eCKOHeYHbli1 exactly [ig'zrektli] - TO\.lHO, KaK pa3 examination [ig,zremi'neif{ d )n] - OCMOTp fair [f£] - pMapKa grow ['grdu] (grew, grown) - paCTVI guess [ges] - 3A. AYMaTb, nOJlaraTb health [h el e] - 3AopOBbe in regard [in ri'ga:d] - B OTHoweHVIVI kid - AypaYLt1Tb prize ['praiz] - npVl3 professional services [prd'fef{ d )nl'sa:visiz] - npoeCCVlOHaJlbHOe 06CJ1YVlBaHVle record ['rek:d] - 3anCb relate [ri'leit] - OTHOCVlTbC remind [ri'maind] - HanOMLt1HaTb stethoscope ['ste6skduP] - CTeTOCKon That's pretty serious. - 3TO OyeHb cepbe3HO. tired ['taid] - YCTaBwVli1 toil ['til] - TPYAVlTbC, T)f(eJ1bli1 TPYA weed [wi:d] - nOJlOTb whether ['weoa] - J1V1 worry ['WAri] - 6ecnoKoVlTbC I!1mD 1m 
"I must to go out and see the world and find an easier way of making a living. II So he locked the door of his house and shut the gate of his garden and started down the road. He travelled about three miles, till he came to a cottage behind the trees. Lovely music sounded around him and Little Pig smi- ;;;;:;:=;. J=--:  led. "I will go and look for it," he said.. In that house lived Thomas, a cat, who made his living by playing on the violin. Little -.... ":.. -. Pig saw him standing in the door pushing the rp .... :: bow up and down across the strings. Surely this must be easier and far more pleasant than digging in a garden! "Will you teach me to play the violin, friend cat?" asked Little Pig. Thomas looked up from his bow and nodded his head. "Just do as I am doing," he answered. And he gave him the bow and fiddle. Little Pig took them and began to saw. No sweet music fell upon his ear. "Gh!" he cried, "this isn't music!" .. Thomas the cat nodded his head. "Of course not," he said. "You haven't tried long enough. He who would play the violin must work." "Then I think I'll look for something else," Piggywig answered, "because this is quite as hard as weeding my garden." And he gave back the bow and fiddle and ran down the road. He walked on and on, until he came to a hut where there liv.ed a dog who made cheese. Little Pig thought it was quite easy. "I think I'd like to go into the cheese business myself," he said to himself. So he asked the dog if he would teach him. This the dog was quite willing to do, and a moment later Little Pig was working beside him. Soon he grew hot and tired and stopped to rest and fan himself. "No, no!" exclaimed the dog, "you will spoil the cheese. There can be no rest time until the work is done." Little Pig opened his eyes in amazement. b 1i?;J '   'I \.. 0 -'" /' ,f , o ) " \ r . , . . . . >....i1.. .__ ." '... .... "'..'.. . , '--' 5 .- -' - · ,  -:,....,. .  Q  D - , - .-., \  ,  ' ..  -". --.." -v-.. .. '...... ........  .... -..".  ........, r-v- .... WORDLIST amazement ['meizmnt] - Vl3YMneHVle, YAVlBneHlt1e bow [bu] - CMblYOK cottage ['ktict] - KOTTeA>f( fall [f:l] (fell, fallen) - naAaTb fan [fren] - 06MaxVlBaTb fiddle ['fidl] - cKpVlnKa hut [hAt] - XVI>KVlHa, J1ayyra lock [lk] - 3anVipaTbc Ha 3aMOK nod [nd] - Klt1BaTb ronoBoL:1 pleasant ['pleznt] - nplt1THbli1, MVinbli1 mJ I!mID '""'\ quite [kwait] - AOBonbHO rest [rest] - OTAbixaTb shut UAt] (shut,shut) - 3aKpbIBaTb sound [saund] - 3ByyaTb spoil [spJil] - nOpTlt1Tb string [strilJ] - cTpYHa surely [,fUdli] - KOHeYHO, HaBepH5JKa till [till - AO travel ['trrevl] - nyrewecTBoBaTb violin Lvai'lin] - cKpVlnKa \villing ['wilil)] - rOToBbli1 
, . "Indeed!" he replied. "Then this is just as hard as growing vegetables or learning to playa violin. I want to look for something easier." And he started down the road. On the other side of the river, in a sweet green field, a man was taking honey out of beehives. Little Pig saw him as he crossed the bridge and thought that of all the trades he had seen this was what suited him best. It must be lovely there in the meadow among the flowers. Honey was not heavy to lift, and once in a while he could have a mouthful of it. He ran as fast as he could to ask the man if he would take him into his employ. This plan pleased the bee man as much as it pleased the pig. "I've been looking for a helper for a year and a day," he said. "Begin work at once." He gave Little Pig a veil and a pair of gloves, telling him to fasten them on well. Then he told him to lift a honey-comb out of a hive. Little Pig ran to do it, twisting his curly tail in the joy of having at last found a business that suited him. But buzz, buzz! The bees crept under his veil and inside his gloves. They stung him on his fiingers, his mouth, his ears, and the end of his nose, and he dropped the honey and rn. "Come back, come back!" the man called. "No, no!" Little Pig answered. "No, no, the bees hurt me!" The man nodded his head. "Of course they do," he said. "They hurt me too! That is part of the work. You cannot be a beekeeper without getting stung." Little Pig began to think hard. "It seems that every kind of work has something unpleasant about it. To play the violin you must practise until your arm aches. When you make cheese you dare not stop a minute until the work is done, and in taking honey from a hive, the bees sting you until your head is on fire. Work in my garden is not so hard after all, and I am going back to it." So he said goodbye to the bee man and was soon back in his vegetable garden. He was singing while working, and there was no more contented pig in all that kingdom. Every autumn he took his vegetables to the fair and brought home the royal prize, and sometimes, on holidays, the cat and the dog and the bee man came to see him. WORDLIST ache [eik] - 60JJeTb, HblTb beehive ['bi:,haiv] - YJJe beekeeper ['bi:,ki:p] - nenOBO.o. buzz [bAZ] - )t(y)tOKaHe contented [kdn'tentid] - .o.OBOJJbHbl creep [kri:p ] (crept, crept) - nOJl3aTb dare ['dr] - OTBa)t(VlTbC51 fasten ['fa:sn] - npB513bIBaTb, YKpenJJ51Tb field [fi:ld] - nOJJe hard [ha:d] - 3.0.. cepbe3HO heavy ['hevi] - T51)t(eJJbl helper ['help] - nOMOL1J.HttiK honey-comb ['hAnikum] - MeAOBble COTbl hurt [h:t] - nOBpeATb, npHVlTb 60J1b indeed [in'di:d] - AeCTBVlTeJJbHO lift [lift] - no.o.HVlMaTb(c51) meadow ['medu] - JJyr mouthful ['mau8ful] - nOJJHbli1 pOT patch [pretn - KJJOOK 3eMJJVI please [pli:z] - XOTeTb, yro.o.VlTb, .o.OCTaBVlTb YAOBOJJbCTBVle practise ['prrektis] - npaKTVlKOSaTbc51, 3aHVlMaTbC51 rake [reik] - pOBH51Tb, crpe6aTb reply [ri:'plail - OTBeaTb sting [stit)] (stung, stung) - )t(aJJVlTb suit ['s{j )u:t] - ro.o.VlTbC51, nOAXOAVlTb trade [treid] - 3aH51TVle twist [twist] - BVlTb(C51), BepTeTb unpleasant [An'pleznt] - Henp51THbli1 veil [veil] - syanb, nOKpblBaJlO well [well - KOJlO.o.e while [wail] - B TO BpeM51 KaK; nOKa Unit 6 In] 
Aoporll1e APY3bS1! Mbl XOTlI1M, 4T06bl Bbl 6blJlll1 3AOPOBbiM nOKOlleHlI1eM, npaSlI1JlbHO nll1TaJlll1Cb, 3Ha- J1111, 4TO nOJle3HO eCTb, a 4TO HeT. KpOMe Toro, Mbl TalOKe npeAIlaraeM saM npaSlI1Jla xopowero nOSeAeHL-1S1 3a CT0J10M. 3HaHlI1e lI1X AaCT saM S03MO)l(HOCTb scerAa 4YSCTSOBaTb ce6S1 YBepeHHO B 06w.eCTse. )I(eJ1aeM ycnexa! 
E T ES FF o Eating the proper foods is important to stay healthy. 1 . What are the five basic types of food a person should eat? Answer: Meat; Dairy; Fruits/ Vegetables; Bread/ Cereal; Fats/ Sugar. meat r--------- t ,,--..... . ............ ----- Meat - helps you have a strong and healthy body by providing protein. 1 II , t - ''f I I I I ( .  I . .,,- cheese \ l ::J:: :E I :::::: -----.-. -----,--- -- -- ice-cream I " milk Dairy - builds strong teeth and bones by providing calcium. , . .....  juice '1 l ! r'{ orange J1't -- .. carrots ORANGE JUICE wildberry "- corn  cabbage !w t L_ - Fruits / Vegetables - help you have healthy gums, good eyesight etc. by providing Vitamins A and C. . . . bread cereal spaghetti! pasta \, Bread / Cereal - Gives you energy by providing protein, iron, and several B vitamins. butter  ( -- Sugaf ! sugar ) \ '-- ----" '- - - /-- -----  Fats / Sugars - Fast sources of energy. Unit 7 1m 
2. CAenaMTe, nO>KanYMcTa, o6paTHbiM nepeBoA. 1) McHble npoAYKTbl AafOT HaM Clt1nbHOe lt1 3AopoBoe Teno, 06eCne4lt1Ba 6enKoM. 2) MOnOYHble npoAYKTbl Y4acTBYfOT B nOCTpOeHlt1lt1 KpenKlt1X 3y6oB lt1 KocTe, o6eCnelt1Ba lt1X KanbLJ.lt1eM. 3) PYKTbl lt1 OBOUJ.lt1 AenafOT HaWlt1 AeCHbl 3AOPOBbIMlt1, 3peHlt1e XOPOWlt1M lt1 T. A., 06eCne4lt1Ba Blt1TaMlt1HaMlt1 A lt1 C. 4) Xne606yno4Hbie lt13Aenlt1 lt1 KaWlt1 AafOT HaM SHeprlt1fO, 06eCne4lt1Ba 6enKoM, )f(ene30M lt1 HeKOTOpbIMlt1 pa3HOBlt1AHOCTMlt1 Blt1TaMlt1Ha B. 5) )f(lt1pHa nlt1w.a lt1 caxap BntOTc 6blcTpoAecTBYfOW.lt1Mlt1 lt1CT04Hlt1KaMlt1 SHeprlt1lt1. 3. Which girl is eating a better lunch? Why is it better? t\ . , "' » g.' ., . - . ." lii- ;;;;1 I I ., . .  . ;, """ I 1 . .  ... - I'" , ,  '" ii ." f" "I '11' I. ,,- t,!!::;,! J , 4  /Ii: -  \ Qs.."h =_ ..,. .. - .. - / -- -- -. -  - -  --- Questions for conversa'tion: 1) What do you usually eat for breakfast? What groups are the foods from? What do people in your country usually eat for breakfast? Answer: I have... / I always have cereal for breakfast. 2) What do you usually have for dinner? What groups are the foods from? What do people in your country usually eat for dinner? 3) What do you usually eat for supper? What groups are the foods from? What do people in your country usually eat for supper? 4) Do you take vitamin pills? What kind? 5) What snacks are healthy for you to eat? 6) What is junk food? Give some examples. Answer: I always/ never eat ... 7) Is it healthy to skip meals? Answer: No. It may affect your energy level and you might be weak, nervo- us (jumpy) or irritable (in a bad mood). 8) Why are fresh fruits and vegetables better for you than canned fruits and vegetables? Answer: Fresh fruits and vegetables have more vitamins. WORDLIST bone [bJun] - KOCTb calcium ['krelsiJm] - KaJ1bUVl canned fruits and vegetables rkrend fru:ts rend 'vectitblz] - KOHcepBVlpOBaHHble CPPYKTbl VI OBOLllVI cereal ['sidridl] - Kawa dairy ['dcJri] - MOnOYHble npoAYKTbl eyesight ['aisait] - 3peHVle fat - >KVlp gum - AeCHa healthy ['heI8i] - 3AOPOBbl n. iron ['aidn] - >Kene30 junk food [Q3Al)k fl1:d] - rOTOBa 3anaKOBaHHa nVlLlla HVl3Koro KayeCTBa piII- nLt1nlOnS1, Ta6neTKa proper ['prpd] - npaBVlnbHbli1, nOAXoAS1LllVli1 protein ['prdl1ti:n] - npoTeVlH, 6eJ10K provide [prd'vaid] - 06eCneYlt1BaTb snack - nerKa 3aKYCKa vitamin ['vitJmin] - BVlTaMVlH 
Table manners 4. nepeBeATe, nO)l(anYMcTa, Ha PYCCKMM SJ3blK nCbMeHHO. At the table An attractive table is a sign of the cook's or the host's pride and respect for you. 1. Be punctual, or the meal may be spoilt. 2. Wash your hands before coming to table. 3. At home, or when you are with friends, offer to help lay or clear the table. 4. Wait for the host or hostess to tell you where to sit. 5. In America, they invite others at the table to "Enjoy." In France, they say, "Bon Appetit. II Germans say, "Guten Appetit", and Italians, "Buon Appetito. II The British say nothing. 6. Take your napkin and put it on your lap. Keep it there during the meal and use it to wipe your hands or mouth whenever necessary. 7. When there are several pieces of cutlery beside the plate J you start on the outside for the first course. 8. Offer others before you help yourself. 9. Sit up straight and keep your elbows off the table. \. . ) \ . \l  - · 4 \:\  ..:....)  ...--.. ,"-..... . '-:. . ... , , , ....  } '-.. ...... 1\,11\ , , r , WORDLIST attractive ['trrektiv] - npVlBlleKaTellbHbli1 beside [bi'said] - PAOM clear the table - y6parb co crOJ1a cutlery ['kAtlri] - HO)l(eBbie Vl3AellVl, npVl60pbl elbows ['elb;)uz] -llOKTVI help yourself - yroLLla1Tecb host [hust] - X03Lt1H hostess - x03L:1Ka lay the table - HaKpblTb Ha CTOll mouth [mau8] - pOT napkin ['nrepkin] - CaJlcpeTKa on your lap [lrep] - Ha KoneHVI off the table - y6paTb co crOlla offer [':)f] - npeAIlararb outside Laut'said] - CHap}')KVI pride [praid] - rOPAOCTb punctual ['pAI)ktjudl] - nYHKTyaIlbHbli1 respect [ris'pe kt] - ysa)l(eHLt1e sign [sain] - 3HaK spoil [sp:)il] (spoilt, spoilt)- nopTVlTb, VlcnopTVlTb straight ['streit] - npMo the first course [cd fd:st k:):s] - nepBoe 6JlJOAO wipe [wa i p ] - BblTLt1paTb 
"L. ,( ))   \ "\ ;)" '-.. ,' . . )) i ,J " , 1 '. " lsl.i' )  \  - -- ...... ........ . -:::=  . . . , /1 WORDLIST at a time-3a OAVlH pa3 avoid [g'v::>id] - Vl36eraTb bone - KOCTOYKa cough [k::>fj - KaWl1SHb cover ['kA Vg] - HaKpblBaTb edge [e<t)) - Kpai1 empty ['empti] - 3A. BblJ10)t(V'Tb handle [hrendl] - pYYKa knife [naif] (pI. knives) - HO)t( mJ Unit 7 10. Ask the people around you kindly to pass things that are out of your reach; then, thank them. 11. Whenever you are asked, pass things as quickly and as kindly as possible. 12. After you have cut off one piece of food, lay your knife down on the edge to the inside. Cut only one piece of food at a time. 13. If you sneeze or cough while you are at the table, turn your head away from the food and cover your mouth. 14. Try not to stuff your mouth full of food. Also, avoid talking when you have something in your mouth. 15. If you need to take something out of your mouth, like a bone, or a seed: Carefully place it on your spoon. After you have put the bone, or seed onto your spoon; empty it onto your plate. 16. It is not polite to leave a spoon in a tea cup. Put your spoon on the saucer. 17. Don't eat from your knife. 18. Never read while eating. 19. While you are eating, put the knife and fork you are using on the edge of your plate. Try not to lay them down on the table at anytime. 20. After each course, the knife and fork should be laid side by side in the middle of the plate handles to the right. This shows that you have finished and the plate can be removed. If you leave the knife and fork apart, it will show that you have not finished eating. 21. Hands should be kept in your lap when you are not eati ng . 22. Before you leave the table, remember to thank the person who was kind enough to prepare your food. 23. If you are visiting a family, offer to help, for example clearing the table and washing up the dishes after a meal. lay [lei] (laid, laid) - nOJ1O)t(V'Tb reach [ri:UJ- 3A. AOTHYTbC, AOCTaTb request [ri'kwest] - npocb6a respond [ris'p::>nd] - OTBeyaTb saucer ['s::>:Sg] - 6JlIOAu.e seed [si:d] - CeMeYKO sneeze [sni:z] - YViXaTb stuff [StA f] - Ha6V1saTb 
KEY 3a CTOnOM KpaCLt1BO HaKpblTbl CTOn - npeAMeT rOPAOCTLt1 nOBapa Lt1J1Lt1 X03Lt1Ha Lt1 3HaK YBa)l(eHLt1 K BaM. 1. npit1XOAit1Te BOBpeM, it1Ha'1e Tpane3a MO)f(eT 6blTb Lt1CnOp'1eHa. 2. Mo£1Te PYK npe>KAe, '1eM Lt1ATLt1 K CTOllY. 3. AOMa Lt111it1 KorAa Bbl Y APY3e£1 npeAJlO)f(Lt1Te CBOtO nOMow.b HaKpblTb it111it1 y6- paTb co CTOlla. 4. nOAO>KAit1Te, nOKa X03Lt1H it1JU1 x03£1Ka CKa>KYT 8aM, rAe ceCTb. 5. B AMepit1Ke npit1r11awatOT K crollY CllOBOM "Enjoy"; BO <1>paHLJ.it1Lt1 - "Bon Appe- tit", HeMLl.bl rOBopT: "Guten Appetit", a Lt1rallbHLl.bl - "Buon Appetito". 6pLt1TaHLl.bl He rOBopT HLt1'1ero. 6. B03bMLt1re CBOtO ca11cperK)' Lt1 n0110)f(re ee Ha KOlleHLt1. nYCTb OHa lle)f(Lt1r Ha KOlleHX B Te'1eH1e Bce£1 Tpane3bl. nOllb3y£1recb etO no Mepe He06xOALt1MOCTLt1. '1T06bl BblTepeTb PYKit1 it1 pOT. 7. KorAa PAOM C Tape11Ko£1 lle)f(aT HeCKOllbKO HO>Ke£1. Ha'1Lt1Ha£1Te C Toro. '1ro pacn01l0)f(eH Aa11bwe Bcex OT TapellKLt1. 8. CHa'1alla npeAJlO)f(it1Te APyrLt1M, 3aTeM yrow.a£1Tecb CaMLt1. 9. Cit1Ait1Te npMO it1 He KllaAit1Te 1l0KrLt1 Ha crOll. 10. nOnpOCit1Te Cit1AW.it1X PAOM nepeAaTb BaM TO. '1TO Bbl He MO)KeTe Aocrarb, 3aTeM n061larOAapit1Te it1x. 11. KorAa npOCT Bac. nocTapa£1Tecb BblnOllHit1Tb npocb6y KaK MO>KHO 6011ee Be>Kllit1BO it1 6bICTpO. 12. Orpe3aB KycO'1eK nit1w.Lt1. nOJlO>KLt1Te HO)K Ha Kpa£1 TapellKLt1. OTpe3a£1Te r011bKO no OAHOMY K)'CO'1KY 3a OAit1H pa3. 13. ECJlLt1 Bbl '1it1xaere Lt1Jlit1 KaWlleTe, HaXOACb 3a crOllOM, OTBepHLt1TeCb or eAbl Lt1 npit1Kpo£1re pOT. 14. CTapa£1TeCb He Ha6it1BaTb pOT nit1w.e£1. TalOKe Lt136era£1Te pa3rOBopOB C nOJl- HblM pTOM. 15. ECJlit1 BaM HY>KHO '1TO-llLt160 BblHyrb Lt130 pra, KOCTb Lt111it1 CeMe'1KO, OCTOPO)KHO nOJlO)KLt1Te Lt1X Ha 1l0)KK)'. nOClle Toro KaK Bbl nOJlO>Kit1llLt1 KOCTb Lt1JU1 CeMe'1KO Ha JlO)l(- KY, BbIJlO)f(it1Te Lt1X Ha TapellKY. 16. Henpit1llLt1'1HO OCTaBJlTb JlO)f(e4KY B '1aWKe C '1aeM. nOJlO>Kit1Te JlO)f(e'1KY Ha 6Jl tOALJ.e. 17. He eWbTe C HO>Ka. 18. Hit1KOrAa He '1it1Ta£1re 80 BpeM eAbl. 19. Bo BpeM eAbl KllaAit1Te HO)f( it1 B Lt1Jl KY. KOTOpbIMit1 8bl nOllb3yerecb, Ha Kpa£1 TapellKLt1. CTapa£1TeCb He K1laCTb it1X Ha crOJl. 20. nOcJle Ka)KAoro 6JltOAa HO)K Lt1 BLt1JlKY clleAyeT nOJlO)f(Lt1Tb PAOM Ha cepeAHY TapellKLt1, nOBepHYB Lt1X PY'1KaMLt1 snpaBO. TeM caMblM Bbl nOKIDKeTe. '1TO 3aKOH'1it1Jlit1 eCTb it1 TapeJlKY MO,!<HO y6it1paTb. ECJlit1 Bbl nOJlO)f(eTe BLt1JlKY Lt1 HO)K pa3A81lbHO, 3ro 6YAeT 03Ha'1aTb. '1ro Bbl ew.e He 3aKOH'1it1JlLt1 eCTb. 21. KorAa Bbl He eALt1Te, Aep)Kit1Te PYKLt1 Ha KOJleHX. 22. npe>KAe '1eM Bbl£1TLt1 Lt13-3a CTOlla, He 3a6YAbTe no611arOAapit1Tb rex, KTO 6blJl TaK Jlt06e3eH, npLt1rOrOBit1B AJl Bac nLt1w.y. 23. ECJlit1 Bbl B rOCTX Y KaKo£1-To CeMbL-1, npeAllO)f(Lt1re nOMO'1b. HanpMep, y6- paTb co CTOJla L-1JlL-1 nOMblTb nocYAY nOCJle eAbl. . CKa>KMTe nO>KanYMcTa: 1) KaKLt1e npaBLt1J1a nOBeAeHLt151 3a CTOllOM C06J1IOAaIOTC 8 Bawe cTpaHe? 2) KaKLt1MLt1 npaBlt1naMIt1 Tbl n0J1b30BaJ1C cerOAH 3a 3aBTpaKoM? Unit 7  
II] KTO 60nbwe 3anOMHMT npaBn nOBeAeHS1 3a CTOnOM? 6. CAenaMTe, nO>Kanyi1cTa, nnaKaTbl C npaBMnaMM nOBeAeHR 3a CTonOM. npOBepbTe CeliH 1) What are the three rules for placing knives, forks and spoon (silverware) by each plate? \ :,: , .. '. ... A . "" " "-. " ' '..- . " I KEY a) Check to make sure the silverware is clean. b) Hold silverware by the handles so you do not touch the eating surface. c) Put each piece of sil- verware on the correct piace by the plate. j . "t.? , ..  4 f   \, - '- Fork - to the left of the plate. Knife - to the right of the pla- te. (Sharp edge towards the plate. ) Spoon - to the right of the knife. Napkin - to the left of the fork. ... '  h.. ., ...... 2) What should you do if someone asks you a question while you have food in you mouth? . Answer: Remember never to talk when a mouth is full of food. (Hold pointer fin- ger up to mouth to signal to that person that you have food in your mouth and to please wait a minute; finish chewing food, swallow, and then ans- we r) . 3) When should you begin to eat your meal? Answer: After all the plates are served, unless the host or hostess ask you to start eating. WORD LIST chew [UU:] - )KeBaTb edge [ect] - Kpa fork [f:>:k] - BVlJ1Ka handle [hrend1] - pYYKa knife [naif] (pI. knives) - HO)K napkin ['nrepkin] - cancpeTKa pointer ['pJi ntd] finger - YKa3aTeJlbHblC1 naJIeu sharp Ua:p] - OCTPbli1 silverware ['silvdwcd] - CTOJlOBOe cepe6po spoon [spu:nJ -nO>KKa surface ['sd:fis] - nOBepxHocTb swallow ['sWJldu] - fJlOTaTb D Unit 7 
4) When you finish eating, what should you do with the silverware? Answer: Place your knife, fork and spoon across the dinner plate. It lets others know you have finished eating. Do not push the plate forward when you finish eating 5) What should you do with the spoon after stirring coffee? Answer: Place the spoon across the edge of the saucer or on a napkin. 6) What should you do if you spill food on your clothes? Answer: Go to a sink. Get clean cloth. Wet it with COLD water. Lemon will help you to get rid of the spots. Gently rub the area with the wet cloth. If the stain does not go away, you may need to change clothes. Then put stain remover on the dirty area and wash the cloths as usual in the washing machine. The longer food remain on clothes, the harder it will be to remove the stain. 7) Mother has cooked your favourite cake. You're the first to serve yourself. What should you do? You should (1) take the biggest piece. (2) leave the biggest for someone else because others like the dish also, (3) decide that someone should have the largest piece, so why not you. Answer: (2) leave the biggest for someone else because others like the dish also. 8) What should you do if you are eating alone? Answer: Avoid bad eating habits -like standing when eating - just beca- use there's no one there to see you. Plan a wholesome menu instead of stand-up snacks, and eat slowly, seated. A pretty setting, a colourful napkin or a gift mug promotes happy memories and a pleasant state of mind when having a meal alone. 7. nocTapa£1Tecb 3anOMHMTb 3TM peKOMeHAaL\MM M nonp06yiiTe CKa3aTb no-aHrnMcK. 36era£:1Te nnoxi'1X npi'1BbI4eK, Hanpi'1Mep, eCTb CTO, TonbKO nOTOMY, 4TO Bac Hi'1KTO He Bi'1Ai'1T. CocTaBb Te none3Hoe (nonHOu.eHHoe) MeHIO BMec- TO 3aKycoK Ha XOAY, 111 eWbTe MeAneHHo, npi'14eM Clt1A. . KpaCLt1Ba CepBlt1pOBKa, Kpac04Ha cancpeTKa lt1nlt1 nOAapeHHa KPY)f(Ka Bbl3blBalOT nplt1THble BOCnOMlt1HaHLt1 lt1 c03AalOT xopowee HaCTpOeHi'1e, KorAa Bbl eAlt1Te B OAi'1H04ecTse. WORDLIST festive occasion ['festiv{;» J'kei3n] - npa3AHeCTBO gently ['cl3entli] - MrKO get rid of - Vl36aBVlTbc OT habit ('hrebit] - npVlBblKa hostess ['h Justis] - X03Ka menu [Imenju:] - MeHIO promote [prJlmut] - Bbl3blBaTb rub [rAb] -TepeTb setting ['setilJ] -cepBVlpOBKa snack [snrek] - 3aKycKa stain [stein] - nTHO state of mind [steit v maind] - HaCTpOeHlt1e wholesorne ['h;}ulsJm] - none3HbI I!1mD 1m 
Meals . Listpn, ea nd retpll Breakfast All people in the world have breakfast, and most people eat and drink the same things for breakfast. They may eat different things for all the other meals in the day, but at breakfast time, most people have the same things to eat and drink - Tea or Coffee, Bread and Butter, Fruit. Some people eat meat for breakfast. English people usually eat meat at breakfast time, but England is a cold country. It is bad to eat meat for break- fast in a hot country. It is bad to eat too much meat; if you eat meat for break- fast, you eat meat three times a day; and that is bad in a hot country. It is also bad to eat meat and drink tea at the same time, for tea makes meat hard so that the stomach cannot deal with it. The best breakfast is Tea or Coffee, Bread and Butter, Fruit. That is the usual breakfast of most people in the world.  - ,.. " \._ i. - --- - " ,. I .- How Tea Was First Drunk in Britain By the time tea was first introduced into this country (1660), coffee had already been drunk for several years. By 1750 tea had become the most popular beverage for all types and classes of people - even though a pound of tea cost a skilled worker perhaps a third of his weekly wage! Tea ware Early tea cups had no handles, because they were original- ly imported from China. Chinese cups didn't (and still don't) have handles. As tea drinking grew in popularity, it led to a demand for more and more tea ware. This resulted in the rapid growth of the English pottery and porcelain industry, which not long after became world famous for its products. . WORDLIST at breakfast time [dt 'brekfst 'taim] - BO BpeMS1 3aBTpaKa at the same time - B TO >Ke BpeMs:I (B OAHO VI TO )Ke BpeMS1) . beverage ['bevdri<tJ - HanViTOK China ('tfaind] - KVlTai1 Chinese Hfai'ni:z] - KVlTai1cKVli1 class [kla:s] - Kflacc (06ecTBeHHbl£1) cost [k:>st](cost, cost) - CTOVlTb deal [di:l] (with) (dealt, dealt) - cnpaBVlTbCs:l c yeM- nVl60 demand [di'ma:nd] - Tpe60BaHVle, cnpoc, 3a- npoc different ['difrnt] - pa3nVlYHbli1, pa3Hbli1 drink [driIJk] (drank, drunk) - nVlTb early ['d:1 i] - paHbwe famous ('feimds 1- Vl3BeCTHbl, 3HaMeHVlTbl grow in popularity [grdu in pJpju'lreriti] - CTaHO- BLt1TbCs:I nonynS1pHblM handle [hrendl] - PYl.JKa hard [hu:d] -TS1>Kenbli1 import [im'pJ:t]- BB03Tb. VlMnopTVlpoBaTb mJ Unit 7 industry ['inddstri] - npOMblwneHHOCTb, VlHAYCT- pVls:l lead (to) [1i:d] (led. led) - BeCTVI. npVlBOAVlTb K yeMY-To originally I J'ricBindli] - nepBOHayaflbHO perhaps [p'hreps] - MO>KeT 6blTb, B03MO>KHO popular ['p:Jpjuld] - nonYJ1S1pHbl porcelain ['p:>:slin] - <pap<pop pottery ['p:>t dri] - rJ1Lt1Hs:lHaS1 nocYAa rapid growth ['rpid 'grdUe] - 6blcTpoe pa3BVlTVle result in [ri'zAlt] - npVlBeCTVI K TOMY, l.JTO skilled [skild] - KBanVl<pLt1Llit1pOBaHHbl stomach ['stAmdk] - >KeflYAoK tea drinking -YaenVlTVle tea makes meat hard - ya£1 npeBpaaeT MS1CO B TS1>Ke- nylO nLJ..tY though [OdU] - 3A. HeCMOTpS1 Ha too much - cnVlWKOM MHoro type [t a i p ] - npeACTaBVlTeJ1b wage [weicU] -3apa60THaS1 nnaTa ware [wcd] - Vl3Aefls:I, TOBapbl weekly ['wi:kli] - e>KeHeAeflbHbli1 
The Tea Break Nowadays, tea drinking is no longer a proper, formal. "social" occasion. We don't dress up to "go out to tea" anymore. But one tea ceremony is still very important in Britain - the Tea Break! Millions of people in factories and offices look forward to their tea breaks in the morning and afternoon. Things To Do 1) Make a display of as many pictures, cut from magazines, as you can find showing different kinds of tea pots and tea cups. 2) Design your own kind of tea pots and tea cups. Nutrition and health Dieting Since ta s a natural product, it helps the body to work and contains no calories, it can be an ideal drink for people on a special diet. Tea with lemon- a calorie free combination - is recommended in most diet sheets for slim- mers. Calorie comparisons: &. ... .. ... , . e,-- &. , 9 ---tIt .  . 1 . , . i' - .: ,_.' : . p.:...   --- :\ . ') No calories - - .. - - ---.:--..... - \.. - -- -. A cup of tea without milk I   .t-: '\ .. '.  '" but with lemon - \. . . . .  1 I \: .- -"'- : ( - \ . .... - 0 - -- - 10 calories - 90 calories - 120 calories - A cup of tea with milk A glass of milk A can of cola or carbonated drink I WORDLIST body ['bdi] -Teno calorie ['krel gri] - KaJ10pVlS1 calorie free - 6e3 KaJ10pVl£1, J1V1WeHHbli1 KaJ10pVl£1 carbonated drink ('ka:bJneitid) - ra3V1poBaHHbli1 Ha- nViTOK ceremony ['serimJni] - uepeMoHS1, 06PS1A cola ['kul) - KOKa-Kona combination Lkmbi'neifn] - COyeTaHVle, coeAVlHe- HL-1e comparison [kgm'prerisn] - cpaBHeHVle contain [kJn'tein] - cOAep>KaTb (B ce6e), BMeaTb diet [dai t] - nLLla, Alt1eTa display (di'splei] - BbICTaBKa, nOKa3 dress up - oAeBaTb( CS1), HapS1)KaTb( CS1) factory ['frektgri] -3aBOA, cpa6pVlKa formal ['fJ:m Jl] - CPOPMaJ1bHbli1 health [hcI8] -3AopOBbe ideal [ai'digl] - Lt1AeanbHbli1 . important [im'p:tnt] - Ba>KHbli1, 3HaYVITenbHbI£1 kind [kaind] - COpT, BVlA, POA look forward (to) (luk fJ:wJd] - O>KVlAaTb C HeTep- neHVleM magazine LmregJ'zi:n] - >KypHall natural product ['nreifr{ ) 1 prdkt] - HaTypallb- Hbli1 (npVlpoAHbli1) npoAYKT nowadays ['nauJdeiz] - B Hawe apeMS1, Tenepb nutrition [nju:'trif{ J) n] - n1t1TaHVle occasion [J'kei3()n] - cnyyai1, B03MO)KHOCTb proper ['prJpJ] - npaBVlnbHbl recommend Lrek'mend) - peKoMeHAoBaTb sheet [Ii:t J - J1V1CT slimmer [slinlJ] - TOT, KTO HaXOAVlTCS1 Ha AVieTe social ['SJuj1) - 06LLlecTBeHHbl£1 special ['spefJI] - cneVlallbHbli1, oc06b1i1 tea break - nepepblB Ha yai1 Unit 7 m.J 
! Making a Perfec up of Tea There are five golden rules to make the perfect cup of tea: 1) Use good tea; put in one tea bag or one spoonful per person and one for the pot. 2) Fill the kettle with fresh water from the cold tap. Warm the tea pot. 3) Pour on the freshly boiled water. 4) Let the tea infuse for five minutes, then stir. S) Serve with milk and sugar to taste. "& Lemon Tea & Iced Tea You might like to try these two interesting ways of serving tea as a welcome change. Lemon tea is popular all the year round. Use a heat proof tumbler and .serve the tea simply with a slice of lemon. Sugar or sweetner can be added to taste. Iced Tea is very popular in America, where many families keep a jug in their fridge through the long hot summer. The best way to make this is to make a pot of tea and after the tea has been infused for five minutes pour the tea off into a jug and put in the fridge to cool. Serve with ice cubes, lemon or orange to flavour and sugar if you wish, this is an excellent economical and refreshing summer drink. ,- "'I .------..:;::::_ I   . . -. "" -""'- WORDLIST all the year round [raund] - KpyrJlblV! rOA boiled [b:}ildJ - BCKVlnYeHHblV! change [1feinct] - nepeMeHa cool [ku:l] - oxnCDKAaTb economical Li:k'n:}mikl] - 3KOHOMHbl excellent ['eksdlnt] - npeBocxoAHbli1 flavour ['fleiv] - npVlAasaTb SKYC, 3anax fresh - CBe)f(VlV! golden ['guldn] - 30noToi:1 heat proof [hi:t 'pru:f] - TenJlOHenpoHVlu.aeMbli1 ice cube [ais 'kju:b] - JleAOsbli1 KY6V1K iced [aist] - co J1bAOM infuse [i n IfjU:Z] - 3aBapVlBaTb, HaCTalt1BaTb jug [ctAg] - KYSWVlH keep [ki:p] (kept, kept) - Aep)f(aTb per [p:] - Ha perfect [p:fi kt] - VlAeaJlbHbli1 pour [p:}:] - HaJlVlSaTb pour off - BblnVlsaTb refreshing [ri'frefiJ)] - OCBe)f(atOll.lL-1i1 rule [ru:l] - npaBVlJlO serve [s:v] - nOAaBaTb K CTOJ1Y simply ['simpli] - npocTo slice [slais] -JlOMTVlK spoonful ['spu:nful] - nOJ1Ha JlO)KKa (yero-JlVl60) stir [st d:] - pa3MeWVlBaTb sweetner ['swi:tn] - nOACJ1aCTVlTeJlb tap - KpaH to taste [teist] - no BKYCY (Ha BKYC) through [8ru:] - B TeyeHVle tumbler ['tAmbld] - 60KaJl warm [w:}:m] - HarpesaTb welcome ['welkm] - npVlTHblV1 wish [win - XOTeTb 1m I!mID 
9. 3p3Tbi aCTO OTOBSIT  /'. HO-KYPHHbl canaT nOA}I(apt ble n KOBble OnbL\a, 01 pble O"leHb nOHpaB"nHCb Caw€ OT x el\enT. np rOTOBbTe HX. yrocTHTe awx pOAHblX M nM3KHX. 'KenaeM cnexa!  -=--- -:. r APPLE CHICKEN SALAD - 1 medium apple, cored and chopped - 1 cup diced cooked chicken - 2 to 4 tablespoons of mayonnaise - 2 tablespoons diced green pepper - lettuce leaf In a small bowl, combine first four ingre- dients. Chill until ready to serve. Place lettu- ce leaf on a serving plate and top with the chilled chicken salad. - --..  ... ... t "--  .". . HOW TO MAKE THE VERY BEST ONION RINGS Peel an onion. Then slice the onion so that each slice has many rings. Prepare a mixture of two eggs and 1 /2 cup of milk in a pan or bowl. Place the rings in the mixture for two minutes. Take a plate with flour on the bottom. Add salt and pepper to the flour according to your taste. Take the onion rings out of the mixture and put them on the plate of flour. Do not let the rings touch each other. Have a pan of cooking oil. It must be hot. Put the floured onion rings in the oil. They will cook quickly. We like to salt the cooked onion ring. Enjoy! ""'"" v , , '-" WORDLIST bowl [bul] -awa, MViCKa chill [ijil] - Oxna>KP.aTb chop [ij::>p] - Hape3aTb combine [kgm'bain] - CMeWVlBaTb core [k:] - Bblpe3aTb cepAueBVlHY dice [dais] - Hape3aTb B cpopMe KY6KOB enjoy [in'ct5::>i]- HaCJ1roKAaTbCSl flour [flaug]- MYKa green pepper [gri:n 'pep] - 3eJ1eHblVi nepeu. ingredient [in'gri:djnt] - COCTaBHaSl aCTb leaf ['li:f] - nlt1CT lettuce ['let is] - CanaT-J1arYK mayonnaise Lmeig'neiz] - MaVloHe3 medium ['mi:djm] - cpeAHVlVI onion ['Anjgn] - nYK peel [pi:l]- CTlt1Tb ring - Konbu.o tablespoon ['teiblspu:n] - CTonOBaSl nO)KKa top - KJlaCTb CBepxy I!BIIm 
 . t . . \ -- , t Nt :' Rt:SS'-' I  g... .. - The food we like to eat in Russia # 10. BOT peenT 6oplL\a, KOTOpblM nproTOBn Cawa, HaxoASJcb B rOCTSIX y rap3TOB. Borshch My Mom cooks borshch very well. It is a regular and favorite meal with us. This is how she makes it. You may try to cook it for the members of you family, if you want to please them. Boil some meat for about 1-1,5 hours in the salted water. Stew sliced beetroot in the pan with the fat from the broth. Fry sliced carrots, onions and parsley in the frying-pan (separately from the beetroot), use vegetable oil for this. Beetroot should be stewed, carrots and onions - fried. Peel, slice and fry tomatoes for ten minutes separately. Put some cabbage and potatoes in the broth. (The lid of the sauce-pan must be open). Add stewed beetroot, fried carrots, onion, parsley, tomatoes, sweet pepper (if you want) and in 15 minutes your borshch is ready. It is served with sour cream, garlic and greens. Add salt to your taste. Meat or poultry - 0,5 kg. Beetroot - 1 piece (medium size) Sweet pepper - 1-2 pieces Cabbage - 500 gr Potatoes - 2 pieces Tomatoes - 3-4 pieces or a spoonful of tomato paste Brown onions - 1 piece Parsley - 2 pieces salt and pepper to taste .. Chicken "Tabaka" from the Caucasus Chicken "Tabaka" is roasted under the press for an hour. Before placing it on the frying pan rub it with salt, peper, garlic and cut greens. Enjoy it! 11. Answer the questions, please: 1) What are the most typical dishes in Russia? 2) What do you normally have for breakfast? 3) If you met a foreigner who came to your country for the first time, what di- shes would you recommend? 4) Do you know any dishes that are typically British? 5) What food and drink is good for you? What things are bad for you? What foods have the most Vitamin C in them? WORDLIST beetroot ['bi:t ru:t] - CBeKlla boil [bi1J - BapVlTb broth [breJ - 6ynboH cabbage ['krebi<tJ - KanYCTa carrot ['krerdt] - MOpKOBb chicken ['tfikin] - u.blnneHOK cut greens [kAt gri:nz] - Hape3aHHafi 3eneHb fat - >KVlp fry [frai] ->KapVlTb 1m I!mID garlic ['ga:lik] - eCHOK onion ['Anj;)n] -IlYK parsley ['pa:sli] - nerpYWKa peel [pi:]] -l.fVlCTTb rub [rAb] - HaTpaTb separately ['scpr;)tli] - OTAellbHO slice [slais] -pe3arb TOHKVlMVI KYCOKaMVI sour cream ['sau;) kri:nl] - CMeTaHa stew [stju:] -TyWVlTb 
12. npO'lMTaMTe, nO>Kanyi1cTa, M 03HaKOMbTeCb. 'iTo6bl Bbl 3aKa- 3anM ce6e Ha 3asTpaK? Pa3blrpaMTe. Sasha brought these menus from Great Britain. See what Englishmen serve for breakfast at hotels. GOOD MORNING MENU Room No:... No. of Persons ... Signature ... Time Required ... Date ... Continental Breakfast L7.65 o Orange Juice o Tomato Juice o Grapefruit Juice o 1/2 Fresh Grapefruit o Grapefruit Segments o Stewed Prunes o Cornflakes with fresh milk o Milk o Crossant o Toast o Marmalade o Butter o Jam o Coffee o Tea Please tick appropriate box Scottish Buffet Breakfast L9.95 Full selection from continental breakfast plus: o Boiled Egg 0 Sausage o Fried Egg o Scrambled Egg o Bacon o Tomato o Mushrooms o Scones Please tick appropriate box Total... Please place on outside of door handle before 2 a.m. WORDLIST a choice of cereals and dried fruits - Bbl60p Kaw VI cyweHblx cpPYKTOB a selection of chilled fruit juices, grapefruit segments, prunes, green figs- Bbl60p OXJ1a>KAeHHbIX cpPYKTOBblX COKOB, AonbKVI rpei1ncppyTa boiled [b:)i1d] - BapeHbli1 brew l b ru:] - 3aBapVlTb buffet ['bufei] - 6YCPeT cereal ['siridl] - Kawa fig - VlH>KVlp freshly baked rolls - CBe)f(eViCneyeHHble 6YJ10YKLt1 fried [fraid] ->KapeHbli1 from the Buffet Table we will be able to offer you for Breakfast - Lt13 6YCPeTa Mbl CMO>KeM npeAJlO>KVlTb BaM Ha 3aBTpaK full selection [ful si'lekf(  )n] - nonHbl Bbl60p grilled bacon [grild 'beik(  )n] - )f(apeHbl Ha rpLt1J1e ]  -... --- ... ,  . -- . .. -- - - '.... FALCON HOTEL Stratford-upon-Avon Breakfast Menu Chapel Street Stratford-upon-Avon Telephone: (0789) 205777 Breakfast At The Falcon Hotel Good Morning! From the Buffet Table we will be able to offer you for Breakfast - A Selection of Chilled Fruit Juices, Grapefruit Segments, Prunes, Green Figs. A Choice of Cereals and Dried Fruits Natural and Fruit Yoghurts Freshly Baked Rolls Home Cooked Ham **** From the Kitchen, Cooked to Order Fresh Farmhouse Eggs Boiled, Scrambled or Fried Grilled Bacon, Sausage, Tomato, Mushrooms ***** Brown or White Toast ***** Tea, Hot Chocolate or Freshly Brewed Coffee 6eKOH home cooked ham - AOMaWH BeTYHa mushroom ['mAfru:m] - rpVl6 natural and fruit yoghurts ['j:)gts] - HarypanbHble VI cpPYKTOBble i10rypTbl outside of door handle - PYYKa c BHewHei1 CTOpOHbl ABep please tick approriate box ['pruprit] - nO>KaI1yi1- CTa, OTMeTbTe ranOYKoi1 Hy>KHYIO KJleTKY sausage ['ssict5] - K0J16aca, COCVlCKa scrambled eggs - YHVlu.a-6onryHb segment[lsegmnt] -AOJ1bKa stewed prunes [stju:d pnl:nz] - KOMnOT i-13 YepHOC- nViBa tea, hot chocolate or freshly brewed coffee - yai1, ro- pYVI WOKOnaA VlJ1 CBe>Ke3aBapeHHbli1 Kocpe tomato [t'mQ:tu] - nOMVlAOp I!mD 1m 
E 13. Listen and read. E The Luncheon After S. Maugham It was twenty years ago and I was living in Paris. I had a small apartment in the Latin Quarter and I was earning barely enough money to keep body and soul together. One of my readers, a lady, had read a book of mine and had written to me about it. I answered, thanking her, and soon I received from her another letter saying that she was passing through Paris and would like to have a chat with me. She asked me if I would give her a little lun- cheon at Foyot's. Foyot's is a restaurant at which the French senators eat and it was so far beyond my means that I had never even thought of going there. But I was flattered and I was too young to say no to a woman. So I answered that I would meet her at Foyot's on Thursday at half past twelve. She "vas not so young as I expected, and not so attractive in appearance. She was talkative; but since she seemed incli- ned to talk about me I was prepared to be an attentive liste- ner. I was startled when the menu was brought, for the prices were a great deal higher than I had expected. But she reassu- red me. "I never eat anything for luncheon," she said. "Oh, don't say that!" I answered generously. "I never eat more than one thing. I think people eat too much nowadays. A little fish perhaps. I wonder if they have any salmon." Well, it was early in the year for salmon and it was not on the menu, but I asked the waiter if there was any. Yes, they had a beautiful salmon and I ordered it for my guest. The waiter asked her if she wo- uld have something while it was being cooked. "No," she an- swered, "I never eat more than one thing. Unless you had a little caviare. I never mind caviare." My heart sank a little. I knew I could not afford caviare, but I could not tell her that. .a' . '. . '. . .  .: :: . .. '"' . ,iP I) f ({( ((rl}L I' . J 'S \\\\II; .\ - I : - )V7 \ , Ii I'... I WORDLIST afford [d'f=:>:d] - n03BOJlSHb ce6e apartment [d'pa:tmdnt] - KBapTVlpa appearance [d'pidr( d )ns] - BHeWHOCTb at Foyot's = at Foyot's restaurant-y ct>yao (B pecTopaHe ct>yao) attentive [d'ten tiv] - BHVlMaTeJ1bHbl attractive [d'trrektiv] - npVlBlleKaTeJlbHbl barely ['bcdli] - eABa, TOllbKO be flattered ['flretdd] - 6blTb nOJlbU-teHHbIM be inclined [in'klaind] -ljYBcTBoBaTb CKJlOHHOCTb K ljeMY-llVl60 beyond [bi'j=:>nd] -CBepx, CBblwe caviare ['krevia:] - VlKpa chat [ijret] - 6011TOBHSJ, 6eceAa, HenpVlHy>KAeHHbl pa3rOBOp earn [d:n] - 3apa6aTbiBaTb for [f=:>:] - Vl60, TaK KaK generously ['cten(d)rdsli] - eAPo, BeJlVlKoAYWHO keep body and soul together - CBOAiI1Tb KOHUbl C KOHu.aMlt1 1m I.IBJI listener ['lisnd] - cnywaTeJlb luncheon ['IAtfdn] -llerKi13aBTpaK means [mi:nz] - cpeAcTBo(a) nowadays ['nauddeiz] - B Hawe BpeMSJ, Tenepb Oh, don't say that! - LITO Bbl! perhaps [pd'hreps] - MO)f(eT 6blTb, B03MO)f(HO reassure [.ri:d'fud] - YBepSJTb, ycnoKaViBaTb receive [ri'si:v] - nOJ1yyaTb, nplt1HVlMaTb salmon ['sremdn] -llOCOCb, ceMra senator ['sendtd] - ceHaTOp sink [siJ)k] (sank, sunk) - 3A. ynacTb, eKHyrb startle ['sta:tl] - VlcnyraTbCSJ talkative ['t=:>:kdtiv] - 60J1TJ1i11Bbl£1 unless [An'Ies] - eCJ1V1 He Unless you had a little caviare. - Pa3Be YTO HeMHoro iI1KPbl, eCllVi OHa y Bac eCTb. (rllarOll CTOVIT B COCllaraTellbHOM HaKJ10HeHVI.) wonder ['w Andd] - iI13YMJ1SJTbCSJ, YAiI1BllSJTbCSJ 
I told the waiter by all means to bring caviare. For myself I chose the cheapest dish on the menu and that was a mutton-chop. "I think you are unwise to eat meat," she said. "I don't know how you can expect to work after eating heavy things like chops." Then came the question of drink. "I never drink anything for luncheon," she said. "Neit- her do I," I answered promptly. "Except white wine," she went on as though I had not spo- ken. "My doctor won't let me drink anything but champagne." I think I turned a little pale. I ordered half a bottle. I mentioned that my doctor had absolutely forbidden me to drink champagne. She ate the caviare. She ate the salmon. When my mutton-chop arrived she said: "I see that you're in the habit of eating a heavy luncheon. I'm sure it's a mistake." The waiter came again with the menu. She waved him aside with a light gesture. "No, no, I can't eat anything more unless they had some of those gi- ant asparagus. I should be sorry to leave Paris without having some of them." My heart sank. I had seen them in the shops and I knew that they were horribly expensive. Panic seized me. It would be terrible to find myself ten francs short and be obliged to borrow from my guest. I could not bring myself to do that. I knew exactly how much money I had and if the bill came to more, I made up my mind that I would put my hand into the pocket and with a dramatic cry start up and say my money had been stolen. If she had not money enough to pay the bill then the only thing to do would be to leave my watch and say I would come back and pay later. The asparagus appeared. When she finished eating I said: "Coffee?" "Yes, just an ice-cream and coffee," she answered. It was all the same to me now, so I ordered coffee and an ice-cream for her and coffee for myself. Then a terrible thing happened. The head-waiter came up to us with a large basket full of peaches. Peaches were not in season then. Lord knew what they cost. My guest, going on with her conversation, absent-mindedly took one. "You see, you've filled your stomach with a lot of meat and you can't eat any more. But I've just had a snack and I shall enjoy a peach." The bill came and when I paid it I found that I did not have enough for a good tip. When I walked out of the restaurant I had the whole month before me , - )\ ..... \  tJ - . .( " , I' .,I   ..... '..' ) I/] -- - JL \ r... '_ ( / . -. /: [--I \ '.' . '-r)"'- .- > WORDLIST ... as though I had not spoken -... KaK ecnVl 6bl s:J HYerO He CKa3M absent-mindedly rrebsnt 'maindidli] - pacces:JH- HO, KaK 6bl Me>K)J.Y npOYVlM aside ['said] - B CTOPOHY, npOYb asparagus ['sprergs] - cnap)t(a be obliged l 'blaictd] - 6blTb 06s:J3aHHb1M borrow ['bru] - 3aHMaTb, 6paTb B3aVtMbi by all means - BO YTO 6bl TO HVI CTano champagne [Jrem'pein] - waMnaHCKoe cost [k:>st] (cost, cost) - CTOTb, 06xOAVlTbCs:J exactly [ig'zrektJi] -TOYHO except [ik'sept] -3a VlCKJUOyeHVleM, KpoMe forbid [fg'bid] (forbade, forbidden) - 3anpeli.laTb, He n0380ns:JTb gesture ['ctestfg] - )f(eCT giant rctaignt] - KpynHblVt, orpoMHblVt habit ['hrebit] - npVlBblYKa, 06blyai1 have a snack - nepeKYcblBaTb horribly ['hribli] - cTpawHo, }')KacHo inadequate [in'redikwit] - HeAOCTaTOYHblVt it would be terrible - 6blJ10 6bl acHo mention ['n1enf(  )n] - 3A. HaMeKHyrb mind [Ima i nd] - B03pa)t(aTb mutton ['mAtn] - 6apaHVlHa mutton-chop - 6apaHbs:J oT6V1BHas:J pale lpeil] - 6J1eAHbIVt peach [pi:ifJ - nepcVlK promptly ['pr:>mptJi] - 6bICTPO, cpa3Y, TOaC)f(e seize [si:z] - 3aXBaTbiBaTb unwise [An'wais] - rnynblVt, He6naropa3YMHblVt wave aside [weiv] - oTcTpaHVlTb (PYKOVt) Uni 7 165 
.,.[ :z: o - - .,.  -  g and not a penny in my pocket. "Follow my example," she said as we shook hands, "and never eat more than one thing for luncheon." "1'11 do better than that," I answered. "1'11 eat nothing for dinner to-night." "Humorist, you are quite a humorist," she cried gaily, jumping into a cab. *** I saw the woman at the play the other day. Now I know that I have had my revenge at last. Today she weighs twenty-one stone. 1 . Answer the following questions: 1) Who are the main characters in this story? 2) When did the story happen? · 3) Where did the young writer live at the time? 4) Did he earn much money? 5) What letter did the young writer receive one day? 6) How did the young man get acquainted with the lady? 7) Why did the young man agree to go to such an expensive restaurant? 8) What did the lady look like? 9) Why was the young man so startled when the menu was brought? 10) What dishes did the lady choose? 11) Why did the young man order the cheapest dish for himself? 12) Why was the young man so nervous and excited at Foyot's? 13) What plan did the young writer think of in case he found himself short of money? 14) Did he find himself short of money at the end of the meal? 15) What did he mean by saying he had had his revenge at last? 16) Which character would you like to be and why? 17) What valuable lesson can be learned from this story? 18) Did you like this story? Why or why not? Topics for oral work 15. Retell the story keeping close to the text. 16. Retell the sto a) as if you were the lady; b) as if you were the author. 17. Act out the scene in the stor where the young man and the lady are in the restaurant. 18. Dramatize, using a narrator and actors. Writing practice 19. As a lady, write a letter to the writer. Tell him what you think about his stories. 'Dear Mr. Mau-9ham, WORDLIST cab [kreb] - HaeMHbl£1 3KVlnaJK gaily rgeili] - Beceno humorist ['hju:mdrist] -IOMOpVlCT revenge [ri'venct] - MeCTb stone ['staun] - Mepa Beca, 6,35 Kr B EmlD the other day [od 'AOd de i] - Ha AHX, HeAaBHO tip [tip] - aeBble weigh [wei] - seCVlTb weight [weit] - Bee 
20. As a writer answer the reader's letter. ear Ms. ... 21. Create a menu for Foyot's restaurant. lFOYOTJS RESTAUJRANT   -.& '111111 -..  I 11",...1'.', /- .  It I J' !1iiil11 I'U ;. '_ ' j I,: '; I 11'lml;lI /II. , '_-:..e ... I , - :  I ., . ;IIIILLlhll :--- MENU 22. Write a new ending for this story. , I :': I (, --.. r- ./'\ ,- t '; " ,. This contract is a legal, written agreement bet- ween , owner of the restaurant, and , president, first bank and trust company. This contract states your in- tended efforts to make your restaurant a suc- cess. Read carefully all the possible activities. Think carefully - then check 0 those you decide to accept. All restaurant owners must choose * activities A REST URANT 1.1. MY WN . . J ,--- ,'-:',-, .,-, . - h \ ;.-.  \-,. \ 1r- ,\     I ;l n fl J _' fUr _ .. t[i j' '[i [i -ij, J h j   r- : , [! i i - I I I .1 \ - ! ..,. A Creative writing contrpct that incorporates a variety of writing activities with skills from other subject areas. \ o Activity NO.1 o Activity No. 2 o Activity No. 3 o Activity No. 4 o Activity No. 5 - Menu D Activity NO.6 - Portrait o Activity No. 7 - Advertisement  ( % \\ 1 , fJ ./ -I \ 1 ,I p. RA 'S'B ,'1' ' .' , "'.. -- .. ---. -- --- --- " Student - restaurant owner Teacher - bank president Date I!lMD 1m 
Activity 1 Make a decision What kind of a restaurant would you like to own? ........... hot dog restaurant ....... pizza restaurant f ' . ........... ca e .......Iee cream ........... buffet ....... snackbar ........... cafeteria . . . . . . . . . .. 0 th e r .................................................... Now think of ten possible names for your restau- rant. 1. ................................................................ 2. ................................................................ 3. ......................... ................. ...................... 4. .............................................. ........... .. .. .. . 5. ................................................................ 6. ................................................................ 7. ................ ......... ....... ... .............. ............... 8. ................................................................ 9. ...................:............................................ 10. ................................................................ Now write the best title you thought of below. I't I . V Below are several ways I thought about designing, writing, printing the name of my restaurant. Below is the official name: '-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-      I'   .   I I. I       '- '- '- '- '- '- '- '- '- '-  168 Unit 7 ,... Listed below are some jobs that will need to be fil- led before my restaurant opens 1. 2. . ................... ......... .. ..... ..... .. ...... . ...... . . ...... 3. ................................................................ 4. ................................ .... .... .. . .... . ..... ... . ....... 5. ................................................................ 6. ................................................................ 7. .......................................................... ...... 8. ................................................................ 9. ............. .................................... .... ........... 10. ................................................................ I believe I will need to hire people. The qualifications I will be looking for in the personnel I hire are 1. ................................................................ 2. ................................................................ 3. ................................................................ 4. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 5. ...... ........... ........... .................................... I have designed an application blank for prospecti- ve employees to complete. It is stapled to the baek of this page. Ac y Some good things about owning your very own res- taurant are: 1. ................................................................ 2. ................................................................ 3. ................................................................ 4. . ...... ..... .. .......... ........ ... .... .... . ................ . ... 5. ................................................................ Some bad things about owning your very own res- taurant are: 1. ................................................................ 2. ................................................................ 3. ................................................................ 4. ................................................................ If business gets bad. here are some things I will try to do to improve it: 1. ................................................................ 2. ................................................................ 3. ................. .... ............... .... ........................ 
c . y5 Price List r O-lalO- UIlUlLue u Table No. No. People 0003652 small large Tasty baked potatoes Cheese ............................ $3.00 ........ 53.50 Hamburger ....................... $3.50 ........ $4.00 Sausage .......................... $3.50 ........ $4.00 Mushroom........................ $3.75 ........ $4.25 Add 50 c for each extra item - onions pepper - olives - bacon Sid ......................... small 50 c a as......................... large $1.00 AL THANK YOU FOR COMING Coffee ............................. 20 c Tea (Hot or Iced) .............. 25 c Pepsi Coke ................................ 20 c or 30 c 7 - Up Use the menu to the left and the guest check above and "write up" an order for you and two friends Design a guest check for your restaurant and make 2 sample bills. I I Portrait of my restaurant (exterior) Here is an advertisement I wrote for our TV station " " " "' " ., , ,\ ''''\ '\ \ " " \ n' L \11.'., ....,..,., ..  t, o .,'"' L \ \ "'''''  '" "'"  '\ ") , / "\ ""'" "." \ f , :... t. ...' ':... .. ,  '" "' , . -:_ , \. 'I -,,1 --:--- ---.--...---.... "'\"" '"" . ,",','"""' " ,  ""'\, . ". b ..;,.....:. , ". ' ... ,,' ,- !.. it 169 
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- HeT, HeT,  60JlbWe He CMory HLfero CbeCTb, KpOMe cnap)f(, eCJl OHa Y HX eCTb. 6blJlO 6bl o6AHO nOKHYTb nap)f(, He OTBeAaB ee. y MeH ynaJlO cepAu.e.  BAeJl cnap)f(Y B Mara3Hax  3HaJl, LfTO OHa CTpaWHO Aoporo CTOT. MeH OXBaTJla naHKa. 6blJlO 6bl Y)f(aCHO, eCJl 6bl MHe He XBaTJlO AeCT eppaHKOB l-1 MHe npWJlOCb 6bl OAaJl)f(BaTb X Y Moe rOCTb.  He Mor 3aCTaBTb ce6 CAeJlaTb STO.  TOLfHO 3HaJl, CKOJlbKO Y MeHS1 AeHer, eCJl 6bl C4eT npeBblCJl STY CYMMY,  peW1I1Jl, 4TO  3aCYHY PYKY B Kap- MaH  C TparYeCK1I1M B03rJlaCOM 06bBJlIO, 4TO M01l1 AeHbr1l1 6b1Jl YKpatJ.eHbl. ECJl Y Hee He OKa)f(eTC AOCTaT04HO CYMMbl, LlTo6bl OnJlaT1I1Tb CLleT, eAH- CTBeHHoe, YTO MO)f(HO CAeJlaTb, STO npeAJlO)f(Tb B3Tb M01l1 yaCbl B 3aJlOr  CKa3aTb, LITO  sepHYCb 3a H1I1M n03)f(e 111 3anJlaLlY. np1l1HeCJl1l1 cnap)f(Y. KorAa OHa nOKOHLf1l1Jla c He,  cnpOC1I1Jl: - Koepe? - Aa, TOJlbKO MOpO)f(eHOe  Ko<1:>e,- OTBeTJla- OHa. MHe Y)f(e 6blJlO Bce paBHO,   3aKa3aJl Ko<1:>e  MOpO)f(eHOe e 111 Koepe ce6e. 3aTeM C11YLl1I1JlOCb HeLiTO Y>KaCHoe. K HaM nOAOWeJl OQ:>u.aHT C 60Jlb- WOVI KOP3HO, nOJlHO nepcKOB. An nepcKoB 6blJl ew.e He ce30H,  60r 3HaeT, CKOJlbKO OH Mor11 CTOTb. Mo rOCTb, npOAOJl)f(a CBOIO 60JlTOBHIO, paCCeftHHO B3ftJla OAH nepCK. - BATe 11111, Bbl Han011H1I111111 CBO )f(e11YAOK 60JlbW1I1M KOJlLleCTBOM MftCa 111 He CMO>KeTe Y>Ke 60JlbWe H1I1L1ero CbeCTb. A  TOJlbKO CJlerKa nepeKYC1I1Jla  C YAOB011bCTB1I1eM CbeM nepC1I1K. npHec11111 CLleT, 111 KorAa  paCn11aT1I111C, ft 06HapY>K1I111, LITO Y MeH HeT Aocr.aTOYHO AeHer Ha np1l111111L1Hble LlaeBble. KorAa Mbl BbIWJl 3 peCTopaHa, BnepeA Y MeH 6blJl u.eJlbl M8C5UJ. 111 H rpowa B KapMaHe. - CJleAYTe MoeMY np1l1Mepy,- CKa3aJla oHa, KorAa Mbl npow.aJl1l1Cb,-  He eWbTe 60JlbWe OAHoro 6JllOAa 3a 3aBTpaKoM. -  CAeJlalO Koe-4TO nOJlYLlwe,- OTBeTJl .-  He CTaHY CerOAHft 06e- AaTb. - Aa, Bbl IOMOpCT,- BeCeJlO KpKHYJla MHe OHa, BCKaK1I1Bas:l B SK1I1na)f(. *** Ha AHftX ft B1I1AeJl STY AaMY B TeaTpe. Tenepb  3HalO, 4TO s:I, HaKoHeu,. OTO- Mw.eH CeViLIac OHa SeCLt1T HaMHoro 60JlbWe 1 00 KJlOrpaMMoB. Im![D liD 
Aoporll1e APY3b! Mbl XOTlI1M, T06bl Bbl npll1KOcHynll1Cb K TOMY npeKpaCHOMY 1I1 lI1HTepeCHOMY, TO 6blllO C03AaHO BaWll1MlI1 npeAKaMlI1, a no- TOM coxpaHeHO 1I1 c06paHO B MY3ex. Bc lI1CTOpll1 MlI1POBOCi1 KYllbTYPbl CO- cpeAOToeHa B MY3ex. HaM XOTellOCb 6bl, 4T06bl Bbl HaY4V1Jlll1Cb BocxV1w.aT'C He TonbKO TeM, 4TO C03AaJl lIenOBeK, a 1I1 TBO- peHlI1MlI1 npll1pOAbl, caMblM YHlI1KanbHblM, 4TO eCTb Ha 3eMne. npll1pOAa 1I1 BCeClI1llbHa VI 6e33aw.VlTHa. nocTapaCi1TeCb c6epellb npll1pOAY, lIT06bl elO MorllO HaClla)l(AaTbCSl MHoro llIOAeCi1. OHlI1 BaM 6YAYT 6narOAapHbi. Ba)l(HO 6epe)l(HO XpaHlI1Tb Hawe Hacne- AlI1e. ECllll1 lllOAVI 6YAYT AOpO)l(VlTb pOAHOCi1 3eMlleCi1, nOMHII1Tb ee II1CTOpV1lO, TO He Bbl- paCTeT nOKOlleHVle VlBaHOB-HenOMHlI1X Vl3 PYCCKO CKa3KlI1 VI 6YAeT )l(lI1Tb VI npo- u.BeTaTb Hawa POAlI1Ha. )KenaeM ycnexa! 
npL1rnaWaeM Bac B HecKonbKo MY3eeB AHrnLt1Lt1 Lt1 POCCLt1Lt1. n03Ha£1Te Lt1 no- nY4Te YAoBonbCTBLt1e OT Lt13BeAaHHoro. 1 . Listen, read and retell the st r) ho Teddy bear got its name. The Teddy Bear Museum We are delighted to invite you to visit our Teddy Bear Museum with almost 400 Teddy Bears, many exceedingly rare Bears only seen before in books! Take as long as you please to wander back in time to your childhood. If you, like many millions of people, have your own, you will almost certainly find an example in the Museum where you will see him identified and all details known about him. You will find our "Hall of Fame" where Teddies are assembled with their fascinating stories for you to enjoy. In the museum you'll find many rare and very interes- ting Dolls and toys. Most Dolls Houses are superbly fur- nished . You will also find Puppet theatre showing Rupert, Andy Pandy and Muffin The Mule as well as many other well-known characters. All the exhibits in the Museum form part of Wendy Le- wis's own collection which has been described as one of the best in the world. It is our sole intention to improve the museum. If after viewing you feel you have any comments, Wendy is always available in the shop and will be pleased to have a chat. I .,t  Ii.. 'f'. f. . \ - :;t ,  Vf-;_',i:. ,BI 1\ ----= .... ,.  ) r, \ :;l.tt  ... ...)  ,l- . \ "\ . I . . I  , I , . How did the Teddy bear get its name? Theodore Roosevelt, the president of the United States from 1901 to 1909, was one day out in the wood hunting bears. He came across a little bear cub, and because it was so small, he could not kill it, but let it wander off. An American newspaper heard the story and published a cartoon showing Theodore Roosevelt with the little animal. Some time later, a toy maker wrote to the president asking for permission to make a soft, toy bear and name it after him. As Theodore Roosevelt's nickname was "Teddy" Roosevelt, the toy maker wanted to call his toy a "Teddy" bear. Ever since then, one of the favourite toys of young children everywhere has been a teddy bear. WORDLIST Andy Pandy - MeABe)f(OHOK naHAa AHAt.1 bear cub [be kAb] - MeABe)f(OHOK cartoon [ka:'tu:n] - KapVlKarypa character ['krerikt] - repoi1, Aei1cTBYIOLltee JlVlU.O comment ['kment] -3aMeaHVle exhibit [ig'zibit] -SKcnOHaT fame [feim] -CJ1aBa, Vl3BeCTHOCTb fascinating ['fresineitilJ] -YBJ1eKaTeJ1bHbl£1 furnished ['f:n ift] - 06cTaBl1eHHbl£1 have a chat - 6eceAoBaTb, pa3roBapVlBaTb improve [im'pru:v] - cOBepweHcTBoBaTb intention [iI.1'tenf(  )n] - HaMepeHt.1e, LleJ1b Muffin The Mule ['mAfin O 'mju:l] - MYJ1 MaQ)(pVlH nickname ['nikneim] - np03BVlLlte Puppet ['phpit] - KYKJla-MapOHeTKa sole [su]] - eAVlHcTBeHHbli1 teddy bear ['tedi 'be] - nJ1IOWeBbli1 MeABeAb Theodore Roosevelt ['eid: 'ru:zvlt] - TeoAop Py3- BeJ1bT toy maker ['ti 'meik] - MaCTep t.1rpyweK wander ['wnd] - 6pOATb, CTpaHCTBOBaTb wander off ['w:)nd] -yi1T Wendy Lewis ['wendi: 'lju:is] - YSHAL-1 JlblOViC AJnit 8 173 
2. MY3eM "MeABe>KOHOK T3AM" 6bln OTKpblT Ha OCHOBe KonneKMM MMcTepa nblOMca. npeAcTaBbTe, 'fTO Bbl OTKpblBaeTe CBOM MY- 3eM. aKOM 6bl MY3eM Bbl OTKpbln? KaK aKMe 3KcnOHaTbi f10ryr blTb B HeM .cnonb30BaHbl? Aa£1Te Ha3BaHMe BaweMY MY3elO M npOBeAMTe TaM 3KCKypCMIO. CMO>KeTe nM Bbl C03AaTb cMTyal..\MIO, npM KOTOpOM noceTMTenb 3aXO'leT BepHyrbcSI CIOAa ew,e pa3? nOMHMTe, '1TO B MY3ee nlO6oMY XO'feTCSI TBOpMTb, aH- Ta3MpoBaTb, rpaTb, TporaTb pYKaMM. Why is the Tower 01 London so special? The Tower of London is the oldest palace, fortress and prison in Europe. It is one of the most popular museums nowadays. The great central tower, the White Tower, was built around 1090 by William the Conqueror on the site of a Roman fort built there more than 1000 years earlier. Massive defensive walls and other towers were added later. Through the centuries, the Tower of Lon- don has been a citadel, a palace, a prison for offenders against the State, the home of the Mint, the treasury for the Crown Jewels, a menagerie, and the first royal observatory. Three queens of England have been beheaded within its walls. The Tower's guardians are the Yeomen Warders who wear splendid scar- let and gold uniforms dating back to Henry VII's time. \ I '. f t }. t' ," . -1/11 f - { . I ,- ,  . » WORDLIST add [red] - A06aBIlTb behead [bi'hed] -06e3rJ1aBTb citadel ['sitdl] - KpenOCTb Crown Jewels ['kraun '<Eu:ls] - AparoueHHOCT Vl3 KopoIleBcKoi1 Ka3Hbi defensive [di'fensiv] - 060poHTeIlbHbli1 Europe ['jurp] - EBpana fort [f:t] - <pOpT fortress ['f:tris] - KpenOCTb guardian ['ga:djn] - CTpIDKHVlK Henry VII [henri O 'sevn8] - reHpVl VII menagerie [mi'nrect5ri] -3BepHeu. Mint [111 i n t] - MOHeTHbl1:1 ABOp offender ['fend] - npecTynHK on the site of - Ha MeCTe 1m Unit 8 - . . . . , , .' . . I : ..  'Jf J t ; 'I I palace ('prelis] - ABopeu. prison [prizn] -TlOpbMa Roman ['rumdn] - pLt1MCKt1 royal ['r:>i(  )1] - KOpOJleBcKVlt1 scarlet ['ska:lit] - aIlbli1 u.BeT splendid ['splendid] - BeJlKOJ1enHbli1 the Tower of London [taud(r) v 'lAndn]- nOHAoHcKVli1 T aysp treasury ['tr3(  )ri] - COKpoBVlw.Hu.a, Ka3Ha White Tower ['wait 'taud] - 6eJ1a 6awH William the Conqueror ['kJl)k(  )r] - BVlJ1breJlbM 3aBOeBaTeIlb Yeomen Warders ['jumn 'w:dz] - VlOMeHbl (CTPIDKLt1 Tayspa) 
3. nO)l(anYMcTa, nposeAMTe 3KCKYPCMIO no 6pMTaHcKoMY MY3elO. The British Museum In the beginning ... Sir Hans Sloane was a great collector. He filled his house with raie books and pictures, precious stones, stuffed ani- mals, birds and butterflies, and ancient remains from all over the world. There had never been a collection quite like it, and visitors were amazed by what they saw. When Sir Hans Sloane died in 1753. his will let the King buy the whole collection for just £ 20,000 so that it could belong to the nation for ever. This was the start of the British Museum. It took thirty years and thousands of tons of stone to complete the building and the forty-four massive columns which decorate the front. The building of the British Museum was finished in 1948. British Museum Quiz Do you remember? 1) Who started the collection which grew into the British Museum? 2) How many columns were built along the front of the new British Museum building? From animals to antiquities... The British Museum started as a museum which collected everything. At first it was particularly famous for its natural history collection and its vast lib- rary of books. Three stuffed giraffes used to stand at the top of the stairs in old Montagu house. In the 1880s all the museum's stuffed animals and birds were moved to the new Natural History museum at South Kensington. Children today are sometimes surprised not to find any dinosaurs in the museum ... but there are plenty of other ancient and marvellous things to look at. WORDLIST amaze ['meiz] - 3YMJ1SJTb, nopIDKaTb ancient ['einfnt] -ApeBHVli1. cTapVlHHbli1 antiquity [ren'tikwiti] - ApeBHOCTb. aHTiI1HOCTb butterfly ['bAtflai] - 6a60Ka collector [k'lekt] - KOIlJ1eKu.Lt10Hept C06i11paTeJ1b column ['k31m] - K0J10HHa decorate ['dekreit] -YKpawaTb die [dai] - YMVlpaTb · dinosaur ['daingus:] -A"'H03aBp famous [If e i In s ] - 3HaMeHLt1Tbli1 t "'3secTHbli1 fill- HanOJ1HSJTb front [frAnt] - <t>aca;J. giraffe [c\3i'ra:f] - )J(Vlpa<t> grow [gru] (grewt grown) - paCTiI1 Hans Sloane ['hrens 'slun] - raHc CJ10YH let (let. let) - n03B0J1SJTb, pa3pewaTb marvellous ['ma:vlgs] - Lt13YMLt1TeJ1bHbI, YAecHbl massive [1m resiv] - MaCCiI1BHbl Montagu house [Imntgju:] -AOM MOHTeno move [mu:v] - nepeMeLltaTb nation ['neif()n] - Hau.VlSJ, HapOA particularly [p'tikjulali] - oc06eHHo precious ['prefs] -Aparou.eHHbl quite [kwait] - COBceM rare [r£] - peAKVli1t peAKocTHbli1 remains [ri'meinz] -OCTaTK, OCTaHK stairs [st£z] - J1eCTHVlu.a stone [stun] - KaMeHb stuffed [stAft] (animal, bird) - yYeJ1o ()J(VlBoTHoro, nTUbl) surprise [s'praiz] - YAIliBIlSJTb ton [tAn] -TOHHa vast [va:st] - 06WLt1PHbli1 visitor ['vizit] - noceTTeIlb, rOCTb whole [hul] - BeCb, u.eJ1blL:1 will- 3asew.aHiI1e world [w:ld] -MiI1P, CBeT mIIIDm 
\\ \.:- ""-  f , ) \ \ ,,-  I : ".fv.. .;...--:'"'"i.: .',',,-':.'Y:--'" . ,f"". \ .., , . ("," j .i!:"y-:':i d' . :t. ,I{ I l"t,;;.... J .) ):'"  .. .. t ,j .  '- " . . .j'!! ·  , \..' Jc1r ,t I · .. . .. 'II. ......:f...  ,. .-. ..., -- -- ;' ..... --- --:---'. " ":....-' 1,,':\1' . i4 '7 . f.t .i,.: :',. IJth ,.i. .' t ,'}',.a. ',0 -: . OJ.' ....qJr1.(I...i. __ -"I ') ll'  . f'' , .. , I \ " '. _ ,. . " I . I :;. .-,..... . . ....... . --.. ) J':'  . 1 t. (.. .. .., , . 'to \ .  r '- '.' '(. ..\, : . The museum's huge collection of books and manuscripts has now become the British Library. Many fine examples of famous bo- oks, Bibles, manuscripts and old maps are displayed in the British Library galleries in the museum. For over two and a quarter centuries the collections of "antiquities" have gone on gro- wing. Today the British Museum is a treasure house of old, beautiful and interesting ob- jects. They come from all over the world and from thousands of years of history. The one thing they have in common is that they have all been made by hand. Every exhibit reveals the skill of its maker and tells us something about the time and place in which it was made. , British Museum Quiz Do you remember? 3) Where were the animals from the British Museum taken in the 1880s? I t<EY 1) Sir Hans Sloane. 2) 44. 3) The Natural History Museum. ;v. \ " . ) -. " j j , " , '\' J.    '. i,.r" " .' j :3.'f: ' ' _. '\ ..) '- - :J'.,l' , '\ . I  . ° \ I '\/ ..: :-.):" '.; ). " .. I ,. \"''  ) I i, I ' . :i J I . J ·  " . i , -- t;J "'. ... --- #": ." - " '- WORD LIST display [di'splei] - BbICTaBJ151Tb exhibit [ig'zibit] -3KcnOHaT heavy ['hevi] - T5I)f(ellbl huge [hju:Q)] - orpoMHbli1 library ['laibrri] - 6V16J1V10TeKa manuscript ['mrenjuskript] - PYKOnLt1Cb plenty of ['plenti] - MHoro 176 Unit 8 Inside information The heaviest exhibit is a winged lion made of stone. It weighs 16 tons (as much as two double-decker buses)! There is something odd about its legs. What is it? The tallest exhibit is the totem pole which is over 11 metres high. The oldest exhibits in the museum are stone tools from Africa more than a million years old. :- ,._-'. . '- ,.1' \. .  2IM"'" :::\ :::' i1. ,  \\r.n'l11' .},.... (.fiit- - ,} , , ;   IlYJ.tl. J  0 \9;  .... . .. .' co' 0 T3 \)p-'\ pole [pul] - CT0J16 reveal [ri'vi:1] -3A. nepeAaBaTb skill- MaCTepCTBO tool [tu:1] - i-1HCTPYMeHT. 0PYAi-1e totem ['tutm] -TOTeM treasure ['tre3] - COKpoBVlLlle weigh [wei] - BeCVlTb 
II ,opowaR  aac l1aMRTb? aKpOTe TeKCT ..1 HanWTe 'Bce, TO fEJbl CMornM 3anOMHTb. 6MeHSlMTeCb 3anMCSlMM c aaWMM coce- OM no napTe. Scientists at work What is it made of? What would you think this mirror was made of? Everyone thought it was made of bronze like other Greek and Roman mirrors in the museum. Bronze contains copper and tin, and copper becomes covered with green corrosion like this when it is buried. Scientists in the laboratory were trying to discover more about the metals used by the Greeks and Romans. When they tested a bit of this mirror they were puzzled because the metal did not behave like bronze. They then used a special technique for analysing metal and the results said: Silver 92% Copper 8% Once they knew what it was made of, it was possible to clean it properly. The British Museum now has a rare Roman silver mirror on display! ,. ..... . ..  \ "'.. -   I'  Jo " . .. . , . . J . I t "-4. -,;. , . t -1 ... .. f, . u ' - . -' , . \ '"": I  (. Il1o l . .. WORD LIST behave [bi'heiv] - BeCT ce6SJ bit - KYcOyeK bronze [brnz] - 6poH3a bury ['beri] - XOPOHVlTb, 3aKanbiBaTb contain [kn'tein] -COAep)f(aTb (B ce6e) copper ['kp] - MeAb corrosion [k'ru3()n] - KOpp0351 covered ['kA vd] - nOKpblTbli1 discover [dis'kA va] - 06Hap}')KVlBaTb Greek [gri:k] - rpeyeCKVli1 metal [met)] - MeTal1J1 mirror ['mira] - 3epKaJ10 possible ['p3sabl] - B03MO)f(Hbli1 puzzle [pAZ)] - CTaBlt1Tb B TYnK, 03aAayLt1BaTb Roman [Irumn] - pLt1MCKLt1i1 silver ['silv] - cepe6po technique for analysing metal [tek'ni:k f: 'renaIaiziI) 'metI] - TeXHKa AJ151 aHaJ1V13a MeraJ1Jla test - Lt1CnbITbiBaTb, npOBep5lTb tin - 0J10BO Unit 8 177 
,,.. \ .... :.: " ' - ., f;{ ,--.: ".;;.. .... ';\,.-, .).. _ \ .;:t . Jc> . ,W'.,. '.I';.::")... ".J.'' I;.'/ .. :.' ........._-: - , .......:.,' ... , ' ,,' t..; :..  ... ;-{l:.. ;:'..-..,.\\;....z:.\!;( . . Ii -.;....c,, .,.:... ,:-:. , "::-B.""I-'}. '...:' #, r '.. . ,'!:@..... ...,.. ,, ,". ..... ""'..'. ':... .(:; . \- ...." . .. ,-'' ..  a silver penny a silver testoon or shilling ',/, -. . ..-... I.... -  ,,"\ ...  .. a crown --4 - '- 1m Im!ID . ". t ""1'"' ,---  . ----, 1 "".J..u -'" ... ' ) , ...-,  It. - .  . '.- " _ 1 ->I' , . ... \..  .I  Dragons and pots The Chinese have been making pots out of fine white porcefain for a thousand years. The secret lay in a special type of white stone found in China which was ground to a paste and fired at a high temperature. European potters had great difficulty trying to imitate the porcelain from China which they admired so much. This vase was made over four hundred years ago, when English pots were still being made out of thick coarse clay. It is decorated with six round pictures of dragons. Dragons were thought of as watery rain-bringing crea- tures. Rain makes the crops grow, and crops make the land wealthy and happy, so the Emperors adopted the dragon as their spe- cial symbol. You can see Chinese dragons on pots in the museum. Here are five of them. Coins and Medals The British Museum has a collection of coins and medals spanning 2000 years of British history. Medals were often made to comme- morate great events. Elizabeth I had this medal struck after the defeat of the Spa- nish Armada in 1588. Until the seventeenth century all coins were made of gold and silver and they were worth the value of the metal. As mo- ney values changed over the centuries, so coins changed in size, and new ones were introduced. In the end silver coins became too small to use. Nowadays our coins are made of base metals and their value no longer depends on their size: a silver penny: 240 for £ 1, a silver testoon or shilling: 20 for £ 1. a crown: 4 for £ 1. There are about half a million coins in the British Museum altogether. Many of them come from hidden hoards. like the gold coins, you see below. which were buried in Kent by a Roman soldier. Per- haps he wanted to keep them safe while he was fighting... but he never came back to collect them again. 
....-- \ . , --, .'  .; . p 'Aft" \ p:.' ,.;;. J. \\\ ..  ), \ - \ \ " 1 1J  -:r \' \ ( l_, ""\. :P.J \r"1 \_  :" :  \ ' '1 ;: ' \  Ii.. ,, I. 1 , -J \ ....... "--    ............ I KEY From left to right: King. Queen, Bis- hop, Knight, Rook (Castle) WORDLIST amphorae ['remfri:] - aMcpopbl belong [bi'll)] - npHCWle>KaTb Bishop ['biJ ap] - waxMaTHbl CJ10H carve [ka:v] - Bblpe3aTb, BblceKaTb chequered ['tfekad] - B KJ1eTKY chessboard ['tfesb:d] - waXMaTHaSl AOCKa chessmen [,tfesmen] - waXMaTHble 4>Vlrypbl competition Lkmpi'tiJ( a )n] - copeBHOBaHLt1e inscription [in'skripJ{  )n] - Hap.nVlCb ivory ['aiv( a )ri] - CJ10HOBaSl KOCTb King [kit)] - KOpOllb Knight [nait] - KOHb merchant ['ma:tfant] - KYneu., ToproBeu olive oil ['liv 'i1] - OJ1V1BKOBOe MaCJ10 Panathenaea [,prenreei'ni:] - naHacpHeVl- ApeB- Prizes from the Games Sporting competitions were very popular in Greece. As well as the great Olympic Ga- mes there were many local festivals. Every four years the Great Panathenaic games were held in Athens. The prize for each event was a quantity of olive oil contained in fine painted vases or "amphorae". These amphorae always have a picture of the goddess Athena on one side. The in- scription says "I am one of the prizes from Athens". The other side shows the sport. This prise was won by a champion boxer. Long after the oil ran out the amphorae were valued as fine vases. When the vase with the boxers on it got broken the owner did not throw it away. He drilled holes in the pieces and clamped them together again with lead staples. Ivory chessmen The game of Chess has been played all over the world for a thousand years and more. These chessmen were found in a sand-dune on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides. There were ninety-three pieces altogether from seve- ral different sets. Perhaps they belonged to a merchant who was hoping to sell them. The chessmen were carved in the twelfth century out of walrus tusk ivory. Some of them were stained dark red to make them different from the white ivory pieces, but this has now worn off. Chequered chessboards came into use about the time these chessmen were made. Can you name the chessmen in this pic- tu re? Hewt1 aHTYHblt1 npa3AHK B yeCTb AcpHbl prize [praiz] - npVl3, Harpa.n.a quantity ['kwntiti] - KOJ1V1yeCTBO Queen [kwi:n] -4>ep3b. KopOlleBa Rook [ruk] (Castle) - TYpa, J1a,D.bSl sand-dune ['srend,dju:n] - neCyaHaSl AlOHa sell [sell (sold, sold) - npoAaBaTb the Isle of Lewis [o ail v tlu(:)is] -OCTpOB nblOC the Outer Hebrides [o taut 'hebridi:z] - BHew- HVie r e6pVlAcKe OCTpOBa tusk [tAsk] - KJ1b1K. 6lt1BeHb value ['vrelju:] - u.eHVlTb walrus ['w:lrs] - MOp>K Unit -8 IB] 
A ship-clock This clock in the shape of a ship was made about four hundred years ago to stand on the Holy Roman Emperor's table. The ship could move along, rocking up and down, with music playing and a cannon firing. It must have given the Emperor a lot of fun! 4 npO\lTaTe, nO>KanycTa, 0 MY3ee eCTeCTB03HaH'tSi B nOH- AOHe  0 TOM, '1TO npeAnaraeTCS1 nocerTenSiM. PaCCKa)l(Te, 'ITO Bbl 3anOMHn 06 3TOM MY3ee Ha aHrnMMCKOM Sl3blKe Ba- weMY coceAY no napTe. The Natural History Museum My name is Gina Dobson, and I work as Press Officer at The Natural History Museum in London, England. The Museum houses the finest natural history collection in the world - 68 million specimens of animals, plants, minerals, rocks and fossils. It is my job to publicise the exciting events and exhibitions at the Museum. By placing articles and pictures about the Museum in newspa- pers and magazines and by organising television and radio interviews I also publicise the Museum's science - the work that is hidden behind the scenes. The collections are studied by scientists both at the Museum and all over the world to increase our understanding of the natural world. The Natural History Museum was first opened to the public on Easter Mon- day in April 1881. The Museum was originally just a department of the British Museum. The enormous private collection of Sir Hans Sloane, a wealthy phy- sician, formed the basis of the British Museum on his death in 1753. Then du- ring the 19th century the natural history collections outgrew their British Muse- um accommodation and a stunning terracotta building was designed and built to rehouse them in South Kensington. Today, The Natural History Museum is famous throughout the world for its beautiful galleries. Visitors to the Museum are greeted by "Dippy", the 26 metre long Diplodocus in the Central Hall. Visitors can enjoy exciting exhibi- tions about the natural world ranging from "Ecology", "Human Biology" and "Creepy Crawlies" to the "Meteorite Pavilion", "Dinosaurs" and the UOrigin of WORDLIST cannon firing ['krendn 'fairiJ)] -CTpellb6a 1-13 nyw- K1-1 fun [fAn] - Becenbe, 3a6aBa lEI!] Unit 8 Holy Roman Emperor ['huli 'rumn 'emp(  )r] - VlMnepaTOp CBw.eHHo PVlMCKOi1 VlMnepVlVl rock [rk] - KaaTbC, paCKaVlBaTbC 
Species". There are also educational programmes and special events, talks and tours. For example, each year in March, there is now "National Science Week" when we celebrate the Museum's science. Visitors can take tours behind the scenes into the research rooms and laborato- ries and meet the scientists face to face. Children can take part in workshops, making dinosaur masks or fossil rubbings. Each year there are 1.7 million visitors to the Museum - a fifth are visitors from overseas. But the Museum is also a very important scientific re- search centre. Beyond the public galleries more than 300 scientists study the diversity of nature using the Muse- um's vast and unrivalled collections. The scientists and curators work in five departments: Botany, Entomology, Mineralogy, Palaeontology and Zoology. The research covers nine programmes ranging from environmental qu- ality to human health and cosmic mineralogy. The scien- tists are able to use the world's largest natural history lib- rary at the Museum which holds superb collections of books, periodicals, manuscripts, maps and drawings. As many as 1 ,200 school children visit the Museum each day and each year 200,000 children visit with their schools. Special resources for schools include an assembly area, fact sheets, activity packs and a teacher's centre to make sure each visit is as much fun as it is informative. The Museum is open every day of the year - apart from 3 days at Christ- mas - and there is always something new to see or do! I 'J .. f .. _.... ..... \ r ....' -, . "!' - · ' . 4t  ..ul,' . .:. '/ .: \ .,"  ' - \ \ . \. ,fifth If' "'1;' \' f' , " "" \',' l .. .'1. J I I ...";,. .>\ \ <,\L 1,\ H, , I '. '  !.t; V - 1t . '\ \ iI. : : · :. l \ t. ,r" II ;;' - J. .. ...." I'!I} r !  · «( . '" . ..... .-  u \ ... ., ...'- t  .\ ..  30(.  . ,. Of .,; .  ... General information The Museum is well known for its exhibitions which include Human biology, Story of the earth, Discovering mammals and Britain's offshore oil and gas. Guided tours at the Natural History Museum The Museum offers guided tours covering different topics for school child- ren aged 6-16 years old. Opening times Monday - Saturday Sunday Closed 10.00-18.00 13.00-18.00 Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, May Day, public holiday. The tours are led by guides who have been trained at the Museum and last about an hour. WORDLIST be known [ndun] -6blTb 3BeCTHbIM earth [d:8] - 3eM/15J gas [gres] - ra3 general £'cten(d)r(d)l] -06Ll\Vli1 Human biology ['hju:mdn bai'Jld<t)i] - 60J1or eJ10BeKa mammal ['mrem(d )1] - MJ1eKOnViTalOLl\ee offshore ['JfJJ:] - HaxOA51Ll\i1c AaneKO OT 6epera oil [Jil] - HecpTb I j 8 
5. Bbl6epMTe AJlSI ce6R 3KCKYPCMIO . 3aKa>KMTe ee no Tenecl>oHY. How to book a tour The tours are very popular, please book at the beginning of each term. Bookings can be arranged only by telephone. Ring 01-938 9090. Arrangements for the tour . , . . _. -,,- ,  -.  - .. " !' ifl -- .. .- " . tt ...;- .. . Jt . I' I J' . It . '-!" ..  . 0' I !' . < .. . ' .. . . ... . \ \ , \\ , , . .. (' . \, In the museum Go to the school Assembly area in the Basement where you can leave coats and bags and organize your party into small groups of 10. Ask for your activity sheets or tour, if booked. A guide will join each group and begin the tour. Topic tours We offer a number of tours on special topics - Introductory tour Are the animals real? Where do they come from? How do you get them? This tour is ideal for children visiting a museum for the first time. The tour aims to show how the Museum collects, looks after and displa- ys the natural history materials in its care. Birds This tour provides an introduction to bird life, and investigates bird characteristics, nests, eggs and a va- riety of birds from across the world. Young animals This tour looks in depth at different life cycles, and at how parental care affects a young animal's chances of survival. Mammals Your class will visit a number of the Museum's gal- leries on this tour. They will discover what mammals are and how they are adapted to living in a variety of habitats throughout the world. Life in the sea A tour in which your children can explore animals and plants from many of the world's oceans from the coasts to the ocean depths. WORDLIST affect ['fekt] - B03Aei1cTBoBaTb, BJ1lt1stTb arrange ['rein<B] - AorOBapBaTbCst, YJ1aATb beginning [bi'ginilJ] - HayaJlO chance [tfa:ns] -cJ1yyai1, waHC characteristic Lkrerikt'ristik] - oc06eHHocTb cycle [saikI] - u.KJl depth [dep8] - rJ1y6Ha discover [dis'kA V] - Y3HaBaTb habitat ['hrebitret] -)I(Wllt1w,e, pOAlt1Ha ()I(BOTHoro) introduction Lintr'dAkfn] -3HaKOMCTBO introductory tour [tu] - BBOAHast SKCKYPCVlst 1m I!m[D investigate [in'vestigeit] - VlCClleAOBaTb mammal ['mrem( )1] - MJ1eKOnViTalOw.ee nest - rHe3AO parental [p'rentI] - pOAVlTel1bcKi1 school assembly area [sku:I 'sembli 'cri] - 30Ha c60pa WKOJlbHKOB survival [s'vaiv1] - Bbl)l(VlBaHlt1e term [t:m] - ceMeCTp throughout the world [8ru(:)'aut O w:Id]- BO BceM MVipe variety [v'rati] - pa3HoBVIAHOCTb 
Activity sheets link with concepts and skills that are part of the National curriculum. The aim of the sheets is to structure the pupils' learning and aid the interpretation of the exhibitions. 6. 3anonHTe, nO>KanycTa, 4>OPMY 3aKa3a. BOOKING FORM FOR A VISIT TO THE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM Please complete and return to: British Museum (Natural History). Cromwell Road, London SW7 580. Day and date of visit................................................................................ Name and address of school ................................................................... . I........ 11......1..1. II......... .... II' ......... ..... II....... II..... ...... 1.1.... ...... II ...1...1.1.. II ..... T elephane no .......................................................................................... Howald are the pupils? ........................................................................... Total number of pupils in the party 11.11................................................... "' Activity sheets are available for collection on the day of your visit. Please tick appropriate boxes Are you going to: o purchase sheets from the Museum o duplicate Museum sheets o make your own sheets o not use any sheets (Remember you are welcome to duplicate Museum activity sheets.) What topics would you like to cover during your visit? . II' 11.1........... II II.. ... II..... ........... ... 1......1... I.... ............ .... .......1.1.1 I. ..... I. ......... . II....... I... ........ ......... I' ........ ..........1................ I ..... II.. I" .... ... ... II I' ... I ..... ....... I... I .............1.......... I... 1..1.... ....1........ I I......... I..... I... ......... I""'" I.... I II... ....., I' Do any of your pupils have English as a second language? DYes D No WORDLIST activity sheet [rek'tiviti Ji:t] - pa60Vli1 nViCT (pa3pa- curriculum [k'rikju]m] - nporpaMMa 60TKa no Vl3YLJeHVlIO 3KcnOHaTOB MY3eSl) skill- YMeHVle, HaBblK concept rknsept] - nOHVlMaHVle I!lmD 1m 
Insects A butterfly is an insect. Insects are alike in these ways: 1. An insect has a 3-part body. 2. It has 6 legs. 3. An insect has antennae on its head. 4. Most have 2 pair of wings. Not all insects fly. {drCie'the insects.  - :.  - _ ":!fll/jj} _ \ grasshopper  t - I.. Butterfly Royalty The Monarch butterfly is a very powerful flyer. Some Mo- narchs travel over 1,000 miles during their short life span. In the fall, large groups of Monarchs fly south for the win- ter. Before they migrate south, they eat nectar from flowers and parts of milkweed plants. This food gives them the energy needed to fly the long distance. The adult Monarchs live all winter in the South. The flight back to the North is made individually, not in groups. The fe- male lays her eggs on the return trip. The butterfly has such a short life span that no individual butterfly completes the round trip. Eight months is a long life for a Monarch. Their offspring continue the migration. The Monarch is truly a remarkable insect. Perhaps that is why it is given the royal name - "King of the Butterflies." Turn this paper over. Write down as many facts from the story as you can. Exchange papers with a friend. butterfly , .- - " .. -- ....:  ...... - . -. . "'" -- ",I  - " :,'. .. ....... . .. . .. .. "  .. ........ , .. .. . . -. . .. . . . . , .. ... . ,,-- , " II dragonfly .... --\ 11 ..--- -- ... -, .... '--- ; .. o  '  snail ant -- J'4'--  A I . t? - , m an Insec . ............... . WORDLIST adult ['redAlt] - B3pocnbl£1 fall [f:l] - oceHb individually Lindi'vidjugli] - no 0AVlHOYKe migration [mai'greif(g)n] - MrpaLlVl milkweed plants ['milkw(i:)d pla:nts] - paCTeHVI, . 8 : . BbIAeJ1tOw.Vle MneYHbl£1 COK Monarch ['mJngk] butterfly- "MoHapx" (6a60YKa) nectar ['nektg] - HeKTap offspring ['Jfspril)] - 3A. nOTOMCTBO span [spren] -3A. nepOA 
-. nepeA 8aM 06pa3el.\ pa6o'lero nMCTa. nOpa60TaMTe, nO)Ka- nyi1cTa, C HMM. NOW VISIT THE INSECT GALLERY Follow this sign to the Insect gallery...  Tick these insects as you see them. " -  .....' . i i   . l;t, - "?t. . ) ...., <  . '} D grasshopper D cicada There are many different kinds of insects. What is an insect? Let's find out. How many legs does each insect have? 2 6 8 10 4 Put a ring around your answer.  Now try your skill. Look at the drawings below. How many legs do these animals have? -  'f:...... ,  j ...    -'" D spider , .  \ \- of",  ..' ..., 1\0. . '\. .1 .. .... D bee \ \  i;o. " '" I '11  . ..] D crab . .... ',- D beetle ... Put a ring around the ones that are insects. Most insects have wings. But whose wings are whose? WORD LIST animal ['renimgl] - )I(BOTHOe bee [b i:] - nyena beetle [bi:tl] - )l(YK below [bi'lgu] - HVI)I(e, BHVl3Y body ['b:>di] - reno butterfly ['bAtgflai] - 6a60YKa crab [krreb] - Kpa6 different kinds ['difr( g )nt kaindz] - pa3J1V1lfHble TVlnbl "". \ t f\. t.  Draw a line from the body of each insect to its . r---........ -) wings. \ .". ../"! - \ '.... / I / t;\.. \ '" / I \,. dJ / \ \ I / .. .If \. "-.,j / /1/ 'f'( '--,  y  ,  e-t (/ /"'--'\ ...... ?= d., . 7 I \   x:... 7 ) I ( \ \ Ji' (,./-"'\/.1 \"-..\../-'<..:.)  .j -. . ('......- ------- '''\--..(/--- -- ).- .---__. h;'"\k\ .- :. j f{\--........  .... './ _ ,.//1 ' I \"  0... \ l.... if I\" 1 I/.-J ...---..... " ..... ') \)/ 'f I J -.-.------ ---.-.--- ('--- \:)--- \ \../ I  /.Y A"" )/ Insects have wings so they can ...........  ___ , . f, , 'l . . . .,. ", .. . J 1t; '-\ , , .. "\ --.. ,.. D butterfly D beetle Now you have found out that insects have ......... legs, wings, and ......... parts to their bodies. drawing ['dr:>:il)] - PVlCYHOK grasshopper ['gra:s,h:>pg] - KY3HeYK leg - Hora ring [ril)] - Konbu.o skill- YMeHVle spider ['spaid] - naYK wing [wil)] - KpblJ10: Unit 8 185 
The Science Museum Introduction 1) With nearly 50,000 exhibits, the Museum can be used in many ways. Some visits use museum exhibits in direct support of classroom work, letting children see "in the flesh" things they have heard about in school. Others the "hands-on" galleries where every exhibit is an experiment or demonstration to try for yourself. 60"50   1() . .  fj .. /': , " .. - \ j 1 '\ . ....... ' \ \ \ < \ - ... "- ... 2) Here are some of the galleries most frequently used by schools. The Exploration of Space, Land Transport, Ships, Aeronautics, Time Measure- ment, The Science and Art of Medicine, Electricity & Magnetism, Heat & Temperature, Nuclear Physics & Power, Optics, Chemical Industry, Plastics, Telecommunications. 3) BOQking Procedures Please book your visit as far in advance as possible using the Booking Form. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I BOOKING FORM FOR GROUP VISITS VISIT BOOKING Visit Organiser No. of Children No. of Adults Name of School Address Date of Visit Daytime Telephone No. & Code Age Range of children Approximate times of (a) arrival(b) departure Galleries to be visited Does your group have any special needs? e. g. wheelchair access, partially sighted pupils etc. If yes, please specify: 1m I!lmD 
FLYING MACHINES In the "Aeronautics" gallery at the Science Museum The "Aeronautics" gallery is situated on the third floor. It contains a large collection of aircraft and aero-engines. , " ':_.:*;J;' 1I J' {.. _".-.. -....  -. "., .......... -_.\ ......... "., / \<- ',.' ,/ {- , ; 'J ' " ..:f-:-.(. ,.,) --=-=---- -' A<" '.  .- ff -. \ ' , :; "',. '. ,-', >} _ -', 1>\,.- ''t"'J , ',> ,,' f - V - . , --::S -::- .:-"'L . iJ t"--'-  ) , .*j . ,,( . I .... ,f ,..' . J>I 7 '" . '.t MONTGOLFIER BALLOON This flight on 21 November 1783 was the first time that humans had left the ground and travelled in the sky. The Mon- tgolfier brothers built a paper and linen balloon which was fil- led with hot air. They had already "launched" a duck, a cock and a sheep safely. The first journey lasted 25 minutes and they travelled 5 miles. Questions: 1) Imagine that you are standing in the crowd watching this balloon. Describe what is happening around you. Think about all the things you could hear, see or smell. 2) How tall the balloon was: was it 2.5 m, 22.5 m or 225 m tall? 3) There was a fire burning in the balloon to keep it filled with hot air. What do you think was burnt in it? J KEY 2) 22.5 m. 3) Straw was burnt. MOONLANDER This is a full-size replica of the Apollo 11 or Moonlander, called "Eagle", which took two astronauts down to the surface of the Moon in July 1969. Questions: 1 ) How many legs did Eagle have? 2) Why did Eagle have such big feet? 3) Imagine you are an astronaut on the Moon inside the Mo- on lander. How do you feel? What can you see? (Try to use all tenses) I KEY 1) Four. 2) Large feet prevented the 16.4 tons Lander from sinking into the Lunar soil. Im 
Art Galleries The Tate Gallery The idea of the Tate Gallery took shape in 1890. In that year Henry Tate's gift of sixty-five paintings and two sculptures, almost all of them the work of Victorian contemporaries, was offered to the nation, but a gallery had still to be built to house them. When opened seven years later, the Tate Gallery con- sisted of eight rooms, and was intended as a collection of contemporary Bri- tish painting only; it was, moreover, a mere annex to the National Gallery, Tra- falgar Square. The Tate Gallery has become the national collection of British painting of all periods, and in addition to this the national collection of modern foreign pain- ting, and the national collection of modern sculpture, both British and foreign. British artists Among the best painters represented in the Tate Gallery are Hogarth, Rey- nolds, Gainsborough, Constable, Turner, etc. Here are some of them:   a -.,. . .' r " '-'t. \ . .. '( . ;- ;; ,. . ... t ..... -----"  .... . ........ . -  . , I, . 11 .. -'i ..... "-  .. .... 4. _ ?- '?, . " ,k. .... .  ,z-.I' .. \. "JI "'\ ::::r . \ Thomas Gainsborough. "Robert Andrews and His Wife" WORDIST almost [':lmdust] - nOYTIt1 annex ['reneks] - AOnOJ1HeHVle consist of [kdn'sist] -COCTOSlTb it13 contemporary [kn 'temp( d )rri] - COBpeMeHHVlK gift-Aap, nOAapoK Henry Tate ['henri 'teit] - reHpL/1 TeT, aHrJ1L/1CKL/1 caxapHblVt MarHaT VI cpVlJlaHTpOn; B 1897 r. OCHOBaJl B nOHAOHe ranepelO T eVtT intend [in'tend] - npeAHa3HayaTb mere [mi] - npOCTO moreover [mJ:'rduvd] - KpOMe Toro sculpture ['skAlptfd] - CKYJ1bnTypa take shape - BblpLl1COBblBaTbCSl, nplt1HVlMaTb CPOPMY the Tate Gallery [od 'teit 'grelri] - raJ1epeSl Tei1T victorian [vik't:rin] -BVIKTOpVlaHcKVli1, snoxVi KOpO- lleBbl BIt1KTopVlVl 188 Uni : 
William Hogarth (1697-1764) is one of the greatest English painters. In his pictures he reflected social life and in many of them the beauty of his pain- ting was accompanied by satire. The "Marriage-a-Ia-Mode", "The Election En- tertainment" were painted to show the life very satirically. In 1742 Hogarth painted "The Graham Children" where he brilliantly used his delicate colours to show the charm of childhood. John Constable (1776-1837) was fond of the place where he was born and spent his childhood on the river Stour. He saw very beautiful woods, gre- ens in nature and, being very talented, reflected nature's colours in his sketches which he then composed into pictures. He painted the landscape without any changes and the trees or other objects were in his paintings very true to life. He is said to be the first landscape painter in England. William Turner (1775-1851) began his activity in art as a watercolour master. Light and atmosphere were his characteristic feature. Turner is a su- per colourist. In 1805 he painted "The Shipwreck". He showed a terrible disas- ter at sea. Green was a colour that Turner particularly disliked. In "Snow Storm" he reflected with the help of snow the idea of survival and even in our days it looks very prophetic. It is considered one of his most origi- nal paintings. He studies colour very seriously and is said to anticipate the art of Impressionists and abstract painters of the 20th century. In his "Rain, Steam and Speed" (1844) he worked much on the colour in- terrelation. Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788). A very lyrical painter who succes- sfully connected man and nature. A very strong phsychologist, he painted mostly women on the background of a scenery. He liked blue colours best of all. His portraits are optimistic and the light and shade of colour are in full harmony with the lines. WORDLIST abstract ['rebstrrekt] - a6CTpaKTHbli1 accompany ['kAmpni] -COnpOBO)KAaTb activity (rek'tiviti] -AeTenbHOCTb anticipate [ren'tisipeit] - O)l(AaTb, npeABAeTb background ['brekgraund] - 3a.£\HVI nnaH be fond of - JlI06V1Tb brilliantly ['briljntli] - 6J1eCTe change [1feincBJ - Vl3MeHeHVle charm [1f a: m] - OyapOBaHt-ie colourist ['kAI  rist] - XYAO)l(HVlK-KOnopVlcT connect [k'nekt] -CB3bIBaTb delicate colours ['deli kit 'kAlz] - MrKlt1e TOHa disaster [di'za:st] -6eAcTBe feature ['fi:1f ] - xapaKTepHa YepTa green [gri:n] - aeJ1eHb Impressionist [im,pref'nist] - VlMnpeCCt-iOHVlCT interrelation Lintri'leifn] - B3aVlMOOTHOWeHlt1e John Constable ['<tn 'kAnstbl] - A>t<OH KOH- cTe6J1, aHrJ1lt1CKVli1 )l(VlBOnVlceu.. nei13IDKLt1CT Joshua Reynolds ['<tfw 'ren(  )ldz] - A>Kowya Pei1HOJlAC, aHrJllt1i1cKVli1 )l(VlBOnt-iCeu., nOpTpeTt-iCT landscape ['lrenskeip] - nei13IDK, JlaHAWaT lyrical ['lirik( )1] - flt-ipt-iyeCKt-ii1 "Marriage-a-Ia-Mode" ['mrerict a: la: 'mud] - "MoAHbli1 6paK" optimistic Lpti'mistik] - OnTt-iMVlCTt-iYHbli1 particularly [p'tikjull i] - oc06eHHo prophetic [pr'fetik] - npOpOyeCKVli1 reflect [ri'flekt] - OTpIDKaTb satire ['sretai] - caTVIpa satirically [s'ti rik] i] - VlpOHVlYHO shade [Seid] -OTTeHOK (u.seTa) sketch [ske1f) -SCKVl3, Ha6pocoK "Snow Storm" [.snu Ist:m] - "CHe)l(HaS1 6yp" Stour [stu] -CTayp survival [s'vaivl] - Bbl)l(VlBaHVle talented ['trelntid] - TaJ1aHTJlIt1Bbli1 "The Election Entertainment" [i'lekfn ,ent'teinrnnt] - "BbI60pbl" "The Graham Children" ['gre(i)m] - uAeTVI rpaxeM" "The Shipwreck" [,fiprek] - "Kopa611eKpyweHVle" Thomas Gainsborough ['tms 'geinzb(:) )r J - TOMac rei1Hc60po, aHrllVlcKVI )l(VlBOnlt1Ceu., nopTpe- Tt-iCT, neaIDKVlcT true to life [tru: tu laif] - AocToBepHbli1 watercolour ['w:t,kAl] - aKBapeJ1b William Hogarth ['wiljm 'huga:8] - YJ1b51M XorapT, aHrJ1t-ii1cKIt1i1 XYAO)l(Ht-iK William Turner ['wiljm ':n] - YLt1J1bM TepHep. aHrflt-ii1CI<1t1i1 )f(t-iBOnt-iCeu., Mapt-iHlt1CT Unit 8 mm 
2. bl HaxOAMTeCb B ranepee TeMT. nOpa6oTaMTe, nO)l(anycTa, c pa60'lMM nMCTOM 1. a) What are the girls doing? b) Do you know the name for the kind of lantern they are holding? Sargent wanted to show in this picture a special kind of light which can only be seen at a particular time of day and year. This was the beautiful mauve (a kind of purple) light of twilight (when the sun is just below the horizon early in the morning or evening). This can be seen best of all in late summer. 2. a) Does the picture show: i) earJy morning? ii) or early evening? b) How can you tell? c) What in the picture tells you that it is summertime? There are several things in the picture which look partly mauve because the light is making them look that colour. 3. Find four things which show this mauve reflection. The lanterns are making reflections of a different colour. 4. a) Describe the colour. b) Find four things which show the reflections from the lanterns. c) What colours can you see in the girls' dresses? d) What was their real colour, do you think? Most of the picture has a mauvish look which gives it a certain kind of mood or atmos- phere. 5. What words would you choose from the following to describe this mood? Tick the words of your choice: lively peaceful creepy tranquil romantic miserable happy Add two describing words of your own in the spaces provided above. Twilight usually lasts for just a few minutes each day. Because Sargent painted "Carna- tion, Lily, Lily, Rose" only during these minutes it took a long time - nearly two years- for him actually to finish the picture. y \ "' k \ -. """- . .  .... \ .. ..  .. \0 I I£) CO CO ...... .  rJJ o  ... > an..J M .... O\ .... I .... > .J .... ...... ......J = QJ .... Z =0 en.... ... < = .- Z en .i< U .... John Singer Sargent was an American artist who came to live and work in London. He pa- inted some beautiful pictures of people out of doors and then became famous for grand portraits of rich and fashionable people. "Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose" was painted whi- le Sargent was living in England. It isn't actu- ally a portrait, even though the young girls do look very life-like and take up quite a lot of space, which makes them seem impor- tant. The real subject (what it was about) of the picture is light and how it can affect the way in which we see things-especially the colour of things. This is one of the few pictu- res Sargent painted out of doors during his time in England. . 3TM pa60L1M JlCTOM HaM Il106e3HO pa3peWIl nOJlb30BaTbCS1 P1t1apA X3Mnp1t13. Bbl 3Ha- KOMbl c HM no KHre uCaCTIlBbl aHrIlL1£1cK-1", c. 308. m11!m1D 
. 9. npO'lMTaTe, nO>KanycTa, 'ITO KonMH BMrrMKC HanMcan 0 caOMX nt06MblX KapTMHax B HaL\MOHanbHoM ranepee nOHAoHa. Turner (1775-1851). Rain, steam and speed This is a very rainy day, so rainy that it is difficult to see. Not only is it rainy but the wind is blowing too, blowing very strongly and howling in our ears What can we see? At the first glance very little, but suddenly we notice a steam engine. Can you see its shiny black funnel? Behind it, we can see the railway carriages, as the train speeds along its journey. This is the Great Western Ra- ilway, carrying its passengers from London to the coast. The train is on a bridge and down below is the Ri- ver Thames. In the distance, on the left, is another bridge which also crosses the Thames. Is that a little boat, sailing on the water? It is very stormy weather to be out on a little boat! It is much safer to be on the train with the windows tightly closed. Shut your eyes and you will soon be at your destination. For this is the beginning of the new age of steam, and the railway will allow you to tra- vel through the countryside much more quickly. In the old days you WORDLIST affect ['fekt] - BJ1V1Tb, BOJ1HOBaTb allow ['lau] - n03B0J1Tb atmosphere ['retm,sfi] - aTMocct>epa background ['brekgraund] -3aAHt1£1 nJ1aH, ct>OH blow [blu] (blew, blown)-AYTb carnation [ka:'neiJ()n] -rB03AKa certain [s:tn] - onpeAeJ1eHHbli1 coast [kust] -MopcKoi16eper creepy ('kri:pi] - npoTBHbl design [di'zain] - aaM, blCeJ1 PCYHOK destination (.desti'neiJ(  )n] - 3.0.. ueJ1b especially [is'peJ(  )li] - oc06eHHo fashionable ('freJ(  )nbl] - MOAHbli1 glance [gla:ns] - B3rJ1A grand [grrend] - rpaHA03Hbli1, BeJ1eCTBeHHbli1 horizon [h'raizn] - rop30HT howl [haul] - BblTb, 3aBbiBaTb important [im'p:t()nt] -3HaTeJ1bHbli1 in the distance ['dist()ns] - BAan John Singer Sargent ['sa:<t(}nt] - OH CHrep Cap.Q>KeHT, aMepKaHCI(1.1i1 )I(BOnCeu-nOpTpeTLt1CT journey ['cB:ni] - noe3AKa, nYTewecTBVle lantern ['hentn] -ct>oHapb lively ['laivli] - )I(BOi1. pKVli1 mauve [m  u v] - p030BaTO- J1J10Bblt1 miserable ['rniz()r()bl] -)KaJ1K, HecaCTHbl  ' mood [mu:d] - HacTpoeHe particular [p'tikjul] - oc06eHHbli1, oc06b1ii1 passenger ['presi ncB] - naccaJKp pattern ['pretn] - 06pa3eu, PCYHOK peaceful ['pi:sful] - MpHbli11, cnoKo£1Hbli1 portrait ['p:trit] - nopTpeT railway carriage ['reilwei 'kreric\)] - )l(eJ1e3HOAOp0>K- HbI BarOH real [ril] - peaJIbHbli11 reason [ri:zn] - npVlHa reflection [ri'f1ektf{)n] -OTpaJKeHe rich [ri tf] - 60raTbli1 River Thames [Ite rnz] - peKa T eM3a romantic [r'mrentik] - pOMaHTHbli11 sail [se i I] - nJ1b1Tb nOA napycaM VI shiny [,Jaini] -pKi1. 6J1eCTlltVli11 space [speis] -MeCTO, npocTpaHcTBo speed [spi:d] - CKOpOCTb steam [sti:m] - nap steam engine ['sti:m 'encBin] - napOB03 stormy ['st:m i] - npeABelltCllOlltLt1i1 6ypIO tick - OTMeaTb raJ10Koi1 tightly ['taitli] - nJ10THO tranquil ['trrel)kwil] -YMpoTBopeHHbli1, Mlt1pHbli1 twilight ['twailait] - cYMepKH Unit 8 OIl 
would have to travel by coach, a coach pulled by horses. But now the steam- engine races across the land. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? Steam-engi- nes are, after all, very noisy and very dirty. What will happen to the peace of the countryside? This is a painting called "Rain, steam and speed". It was painted in 18th century by the English artist Turner. Turner often painted subjects showing the impact of the Industrial Revolution upon the country. Constable (1776-1837). The Cornfield A favourite joke of the English is their weather. England is a land where it rains all the time or so they say! In this painting, the weather seems to be very windy and the clouds are grey - perhaps it will rain soon. But the English love their countryside and if it wasn't for the rain, it would not be so green. Here, the trees are green and the corn stands high in the field, waiting for the harvest. This is a typical view of the English rural landscape from the nineteenth centu- ry. The thirsty shepherd boy drinks from the stream, while the ass licks moisture from the leaves. Is the shepherd boy doing his job? He has not noticed that the gate to the cornfield is broken, making a gap in the fence, will the sheep escape into the field and trample the crops? The sheepdog has noticed and will bark to attract the shepherd-boy's attention and the farmer in the field will close the gate. All will be well, but the shepherd -boy should pay more attention to his job! The picture is called "The Cornfield" and was painted by the landscape artist John Constable, in 1824. Constable came from the county of Suffolk, one of the prettiest parts of England and painted its scenery many times. ... } \ . \ f "  "" } -" ...: .. .. ')--. .... ...  . :i · ... , . ... .... or '.. '"  . : \ -, . <iii" \ "' "'.. . ...: . '. o\: "  \, ," , ...., .; ; ... '" .... to ' ... ¥..,:.... 1,; .. , . . \ ... "  tn . -... . ,. ...- , -'" . .- -'-'\, ..  . -t -... .. ..... 4> . . ... . . .' " \ -. . .. ...  .. . . WORDLIST ass [res] - oceJ1 attract ['trrekt] - npVlBJ1eKaTb bark [b a: k] - l1a5JTb coach [kutf] - KapeTa, SKVlnIDK corn [k:n] - nweHVlu.a cornfield ['k:nfi:ld] - nWeHVlYHOe nOJ1e countryside ['kAntrisaid] - cel1bCKa5J MeCTHOCTb, AepeBH crop [krp] - YPo)l(a escape [is'keip] - 6e)l(aTb fence [fens] -3a60p gap [grep] - np0110M, 6pewb harvest ('ha:vist] - )l(aTBa impact ['imprekt] - BJlLt1He, B03Ae£1cTBe Industrial Revolution [in'dAstri1 .rev'luJn] - npo- MblWlleHHa peBOJ1IOUVl5J joke [cBuk] - WYTKa 1m Unit 8 landscape ['Irenskeip] - nei13a)l( leaf [li:f] -J1Lt1CT; MH.4. leaves [Ii:vz] -J1V1CTb lick [lik] - J1V13aTb moisture ['misif] - BJ1ara noisy ['nizi] - WYMHbli1 notice ['nutis] -3aMe4aTb, 06paTb BHVlMaHVle peace [pi:s] - cnoKoi1cTBit1e, TVlWVlHa pretty ['priti] - MVlJ1bli1. npVl5JTHbl rural ['rur( )I] - Cel1bCKi'1i1 scenery ['si:nri] - nei13a)l( seem ['si:m] - Ka3aTbC sheepdog ['Ji:pdg] - OByapKa shepherd ['JepJd] - nacryx stream [stri:m] - PY4ei1 Suffolk ['sAfk] - rpa<pcTBo CYCPCPOJ1K B AHrllLt1i-1 trample ['trrempl] -TonTaTb windy ['windi] - BeTpeHbli1, XMYPbli1  
, Hogarth (1697-1764). Before the marriage Hogarth is the great English satirist of the eighteenth century. On the right we see Lord Squanderfield pointing to his family tree. His family is ancient and noble, but he has wasted his fortune. He is fat and gouty and obviously eats too much. Outside, the builders have stopped work. There is no money to pay them, and without payment, they will not work. They are on strike! Opposite him sits a wealthy merchant. Lord Squanderfield wants some of his money! The merchant has plenty of money, but his family does not have a noble and ancient name. So, a marriage is arranged between their child- ren. Lord Squanderfield's son will marry the merchant's daughter, and the two families will each get what they want. Lord Squanderfield will get the money and the merchant's daughter will have a noble title. But does the merchant's daughter look very happy? What is the lawyer suggesting to her? Lord Squanderfield's son does not seem to care that the two will be shackled together in an arranged marriage. Can you see the two dogs in the corner? They are shackled together with a chain just like the unhappy couple. .... .11 . oJ  'I.   ':"' 7  -  t WORDLIST ancient ['einfnt] -ApeBHVI arrange ['reinct] - YCTpaViBaTb be on strike [straik] - 6acToBaTb chain [tfein] - u.enb couple [kApl] - napa fat - Hbl, )I(PHbl£1 fortune ['f:1f( )n] - COCTOSlHe gouty ('gauti] - nOAarpYecKVI£1 lawyer ('l:j] -lOpVlCT, (lABOKaT merchant ('m:tfnt] - KYneu. noble ('nubl] - 61larOpoAHblt1, 3HaTHbI obviously ['bvisli] - OYeBAHO payment ['peimnt] -OnllaTa plenty ['plenti] - MHoro point to [pint] -YKa3b1BaTb Ha satirist ['sretrist] - caTpK shackle Urekl] - coeAVlHSlTb suggest [slctest] - npeAf)araTb waste [weist] - 3A. npoMoTaTb wealthy ('weI8i] - 60raTbl£1 7 KHHra AI1S1 "ITeHHSI K Y"le6HHKY «C"IaCTI1. aHrl1.-2) IImUD 1m 
\ The State Tretyakov Gallery The building standing opposite the sout- hern walls of the Kremlin, beyond the Moskva River, was built at the beginning of the 20th century from a design by the famous Russian artist Viktor Vasnetsov, a connoisseur of old Moscow. It looks like an illustration to an old Russian tale. The facade is decorated with the ancient coat of arms of Moscow. An inscription on both sides says: "The Moscow city art gallery named after Pavel Mikhailovich and Sergei Mikhailovich Tretyakov. Founded by P. M. Tretyakov in 1856 and presented to Moscow in 1892, to- gether with the collection which S. M. Tretya- kov had bequeathed to the city." Pavel Tretyakov, a merchant by birth and an outstanding patron of Russian art, dedicated 40 years of his life to his main calling - the establishment of a national art museum. From the beginning he sought to build up a collection of realistic, poetic paintings by Russian artists who loved their country. Tretyakov purchased paintings that have become part of the golden trea- sury of Russian art and are regarded as milestones in its history. He supported many Russian painters and commissioned numerous paintings. He was parti- cularly fond of Repin. Many of Repin's paintings can be seen in the gallery, including his masterpiece, "Ivan Grozny and His Son, Ivan". Another giant of Russian art, Surikov, owed a great deal to Tretyakov. His painting "The Execution of the Streltsi", "Boyarinya Morozova" and other fa- mous canvases hold pride of place in the gallery. Some people think that it is as beautiful and important as the Art Theatre, the S1. Basil's Cathedral and everything that is best in Moscow. The gallery has tens of thousands of paintings, drawings, sculptures and icons. Among the icons are some world-famous masterpieces by Andrei Rublyov. A new huge building for the gallery is on the bank of the Moskva River. II .  , .. .. . WORD LIST artist ra:tist] - XYAO)KHlt1K bequeath [bi'kwi:o] -3aBeaTb beyond [bi'jnd] - no Ty CTOPOHY calling ['k:1iI)] - nplt13BaHVle coat of arms [kut v a:mz] - rep6 collection [k']ekfn] - KOJ1J1eKUVlSJ commission [k'mif()n] -3aKa3blBaTb connoisseur Lkn's:] - 3HaTOK dedicate ['dedikeit] - nOCBS1aTb establishment [is'treblifmnt] - C03AaHlt1e execution Leksi'kju:f()n] - Ka3Hb facade [f'sa:d] - ct>acaA from a design [di'zain] - no aCKVl3Y giant ['cBaint] -TLt1TaH illustration Lils'treif(  )n] - J1J1IOCTpau.lt1S1 including [in'klu:dilJ] - BKJ1IOaSJ inscription [in'skripf(  )n] - H(lAnLt1Cb masterpiece ['ma:stpi:s] - weAeBp merchant ['m:tfnt] - KYneu., ToproBeu. milestone ['mai1stun] - Bexa numerous ['nju:mrs] - MHOrOlt1CJleHHbI outstanding patron Laut'strendilJ 'peitrn] - BblAa- 1OLt1i1CS1 nOKpOBVlTeJlb owe (to) [u] -3A. 6blTb 06SJ3aHHbiM particularly [p'tikju]li] - oc06eHHo poetic [po(u)'etik] - noaTVIecKVli1 purchase ['p:tfs] - nOKYnaTb realistic Lri'listik] - peaJILt1CTlt1YHbli1 regard [ri' g a: d] - CYlt1TaTbCS1 seek [si:k] (sought, sought) - cTpeMTbcSJ (K) southern ['sAon] -1O)KHbli1 support [s'p:t] - nOJ]JJ.ep)KVlBaTb. nOMoraTb tale - CKa3Ka treasury ['tre3(  )ri] - COKpOBlt1UJ.HVlu.a 1m I!mID 
10. 5YAbTe rMAOM. npoBeAMTe 3KCKYPCVUO no TpeTbSlKoBCKO ra- nepee. 11. Bbl OTKpblBaeTe MY3eM OAHOM KapTMHbl. Bbl npeA11araeTe B3RTb nlO6oe npoM3BeAeHMe M3 TpeTbSlKoBCKOH ranepe. npoBeAMTe 3KCKYPCMIO B CBoeM M}'3ee. nonpo6YMTe CAenaTb pa6o'fYIO KapTY AJ1R Tex, KTO 3aXO'feT M3Y'1Tb 3TO npOM3BeAeHMe. 12. Listen, read and retell. "Shrovetide" by Kustodiyev This painting is a landscape. I like this work because a Russian national holiday is portrayed. The people are happy and merry. The old Moscow, the Kremlin, and a lot of different Orthodox cathedrals with are painted. There is a street where people are sledging. The artist has created a good holiday mood for people to see and be proud of old Moscow. The colour of the landscape is bright and sunny. In the foreground one can see a horse harnessed in a sledge, trees pow- dered with snow and a lot of tracks of other sledges on the snow. In the bac- kground there are birds, beautiful churches, a lot of trees and the sky that is playing with different kinds of fairy-tale colours. This painting arouses some merry holiday feelings. Y. Erusolimsky, a 10 year old student. <.-;  -r_ ., _ i -& "'f - ;   - ...-  - ......--... - .. -- ." , :.".. - 't , ' . -, . . r J J \ \ I  ' ,) . " I. III t1l , .. ... c r, , I ... . . "  '  . t  \' - WORDLIST arouse [Irauz] - np06}1)KAaTb canvas ['krenvs] - KapTVlHa colouring ['kAlril)] = colour ['kAI] - K0J10pT drawing ['dr:il)] - pLt1CYHOK harness ['ha:nis] -3anpSJraTb huge [hju:cB] - orpoMHbli1, rpoMa.o.Hbl icon ['aikn] - VlKOHa in the background ['brekgraund] - Ha 3aAHeM nllaHe in the foreground ['f:graund] - Ha nepeAHeM nJ1aHe landscape ['lrenskeip] - nei13a)l( orthodox ['=:>:8;}d=:>ks] - npaBOCJ1aBHbJi1 painting ['pei ntil)] - >KVlBOnViCb play - 3A. nepeJ1BaTbCSJ (0 KpacKax) portray [p:'trei] - Lt1306pa>KaTb powdered with snow ['paudd] - 3anopoweHHbie CHerOM sculpture ['skAI ptf;} ] - CKYJ1bnrypa shrovetide [,fruvtaid] - MaCJ1eHVlu.a sledge [sleet] - caH temple ['tempI] -xpaM I!lmD 1m 
13. Try to make a back translation, please. KYCTOAMeB "MaCneHML\a" 3Ta KapTl-1Ha - ne3a>K. MHe HpaBl-1TC 3TO np0l-13BeAeHl-1e, nOTOMY YTO 3AeCb l-1306pa>KeH PYCCKl-1 HapOAHbl npa3AHl-1K. JltOAl-1 CyaCTJll-1Bbl, l-1 l-1M OyeHb BecellO. CTapa MOCKBa, KpeMllb l-1 MHO>KeCTBO npaBOCllaBHblX xpaMOB l-1306pa>KeHbl Ha KapTl-1He. JltOAl-1 B caHX eAYT no Ylll-1L.J.e. XYAO>KHl-1K C03Aall xopowee, npa3AHl-1YHOe Ha- CTpOeHl-1e, YTo6bl lltOAl-1 CMOTpelll-1 l-1 rOPAl-111l-1Cb CTapo MOCKBO. K01l0pl-1T ne3a>Ka pKl-1 l-1 COJlHeYHbl. Ha nepeAHeM nllaHe l-1306pa>KeHbl llowClAb, 3anp>KeHHa B CaHl-1, AepeBb, 3anopoweHHbie CHerOM, l-1 MHoro ClleAOB OT APyrl-1X caHe Ha cHery. Ha 38AHeM nlla- He - nTl-1L.J.bl, KpaCl-1Bble u.epKBl-1, MHoro AepeBbeB l-1 He60, KOTopoe nepelll-1BaeTC pa3HOL.J.BeTHbIMl-1. CKa30YHbIMl-1 KpaCKaMl-1. 3Ta KapTl-1Ha Bbl3blBaeT PClAOCTHoe, npa3AHl-1YHOe ow,yw,eHl-1e. 14. K 8aM B rOCTM npMexanM aHrnM'IaHe. PaCCKa)l(MTe MM 0 MaHe- )ICe B MocKBe. Manezh MANEZH (Manege) is a building on the western side of the Kremlin. It is near Alexan- drovsky Gardens. Now it is the Central Exhibi- tion Hall. Manezh was built in 1817 for parades and the training of the Moscow cavalry, and as a memorial to the Russian victory in 1812. The walls are 166.1 x 44.7 m long. There is not a single internal support. The roof rests on crosswise timber rafters. It is the first building of such construction in Mos- cow. Architect Osip Sove, ornamented the buil- ding with strong half columns and decorated the walls. The building was completed in 6 months. Contemporaries wrote that there was "nothing anywhere in Europe." Many engineers have made a study of the roof, which has been described in many building textbooks. In the 19th century the Manezh became a major cultural centre in the city. It was used for different exhibitions. In 1908 the building was used for the first international exhibition of cars, bicycles and sports equipment.  - - - - '- =-   ;;:- "':---  -.. - - - - - ;ifji_- . -r . -------  --=-- - - WORDLIST cavalry rkrevlri] - KaBallepVlS1 Central Exhibition Hall ['sentr(  )l,eksi'biJ( )n h3:1] - lJ,eHTpaIlbHblt1 BbICTaBOYHblt1 3aIl choir ['kwai] - Xop conduct [kn'dAkt] -ALt1pVl>KVlpOBaTb, PYKOBOATb construction [kn'strAkJ(  )n] - KOHCTPYKl\t.1S1 contemporary [kn'temp()rri] -coBpeMeHHK crosswise ['kr3s'waiz] - KpecT-HaKpecT, CKpe- eHHbli1 describe [dis'kraib] - onVlCblBaTb half column ['ha:f 'k31m] - n0J1YK0J10HHa Kremlin ['kremlin] - KpeMJ1b 1m I!ImD " Manezh [nlre'nei3] - MaHe>K memorial [mi'm:ril] - naMTHLt1K orchestra ['3:kistr] - opKecTp ornament ['3:nmnt] -YKpawaTb parade [pa'reid] - napaA rest - onpaTbCS1 There is not a single internal support. - TaM HeT H eAt.1Hoi1 BHYTpeHHei1 OnOpbl. timber rafter ['timba 'ra:ft]-AepeB5JHHblecTponWla training ('treinil)] - nOArOTOBKa, 06yYeHVle victory ['vi kt (  ) ri] - n06eAa visitor ['vizit] - nOCeTt.1TeJ1b 
The finest musicians in Russia and Europe, including Hector Berlioz, played at gala concerts at the Manezh. On December 27, 1867, Berlioz conducted a choir and orchestra of 700 there, playing his own music and that of Russian composers, before an audience of 12,000. In 1957 it was decided that Manezh should be turned into a Central Exhibi- tion Hall. Since then it has housed many art exhibitions which attract over a million visitors a year. 15. npO'lMTaMTe 06 AnMa3HoM cl>oHAe. The Diamond Treasury The Diamond Treasury of Russia is a world-famous collection of jewellery. For many centuries Russian monarchs kept treasures that amaze with fantastic splendour. There was a special store-room for the tsar treasures in the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg. It was called the Diamond Room. The decree of Peter I of 1719 on special attention to keeping the Crown Regalia as state treasures confirms the significance of the collection. In 1762 the Grand Imperial Crown was created for the coronation of Catherine the Great. The beauty of the crown eclipsed every other crown of all countries and all times. It was the symbol of power and might of the Russian emperors. The sceptre crowned with the two-headed eagle, the Emblem of the Russian Empire, was the symbol of temporal power. The scep- tre was decorated with the world-famous Or- lov diamond. The gold orb crowned with a blue sapphire and a cross was the symbol of ecclesiastical power. Three gems in the regalia - the Orlov diamond, the blue sapphire and the scarlet spinel symbolized the colours of the Russian banner - white, blue and red. In 1896 the Russian Emperor Nicholas II was the last to use these regalia during coronation. In 1914, when the First World War broke out, treasures from the Diamond Room were transferred to the Moscow Kremlin. i t , " .. - . . .' I : ..  A. \. ' -.. ... \. \'- 'I . " " "':'.(= "'c.( f . .  ). i':\ t · '"- " 4' , , I' ... ....... .. Greater Imperial Crown, Sceptre, Orb, Lesser Imperial Crown, Coroniation chain of the Order of St. Andrew, the First-Called Apostle, the Star of the Order of St. Andrew. the First-Called Apostle, Coroniation mantle. II HanMWMTe, TO Bbl 3anOMHMnM M3 npO'fMTaHHOrO. 06MeHSlMTeCb C coceAOM no napTe TeM, 'ITO Bbl HanMcanM. WORDLIST attract ['trrekt] - npBJ1eKaTb audience [':djns] - aYALt1TOp, ny6J1V1Ka, 3pTeJ1Lt1 be turned into [t:nd] -6blTb npeBpaeHHblM BO "ITO- /l60 gala ['ga: 1] - npa3AHLt1"1Hblt1 house [hauz] -nOMeaTb, pa3MeaTb I!lmD 1m 
16. npO'lMTaMTe TeKcT, cAenaMTe o6paTHbiM nepeBOA. Alexander Pushkin Museum Flat The Museum is situated at No. 12 Moika Embankment in St. Petersburg and was opened in 1925. The poet lived there from September 12, 1836 till his death on, January 12, 1837. The sad news that Pushkin had been seriously wounded spread around the city at once. He died two days later. Thousands of people walked to the house to bid farewell to their dear poet. In 1987 the museum was restored after long repairs. Unfortunately there are few of Pushkin's things and most of them are in his study, where he died. The study is a large, light and clean room. There is a desk with an armchair, bookshelves with four thousand books in 14 languages, a writing bureau, a fireplace with a mantelpiece clock showing the time of the poet's death. One can see some sheets of paper, books, a goose-quill pen and a bronze inkstand with a figure of a Negro boy. The figure reminded him of his great grandfather Ibrahim Hannibal. In his study there are portraits of his fellow poets Anton Delvig, Jevgeny Baratynsky and Vasily Zhukovsky. The bookshelves with different books oc- cupy much space. During his life the poet was fond of collecting old and rare books. In the hall visitors can see the poet's wais- tcoat he was wearing at the duel, his death- mask and the locket with a lock of hair. Tourists from different countries of the world visit and admire the Pushkin Museum Flat. If you're in st. Petersburg do visit this museum. -.--- \ t \. . , ..... --... Questions and answerers: 1) Where is the Pushkin Museum Flat situated? It is situated at No. 12 Moika Embankment in St. Petersburg. 2) Whom was the duel with? The duel was with Dantes. 3) Why did people mourn on January 29, 1837? People mourned because of the poefs death. 4) Whose portraits are there in the study? There are the portraits of V. Zhukovsky, Anton Delvig, Jevgeny Baratynsky.  ;::: VII 111 -  gNi WORDLIST be wounded ['wu:ndid] -6blTb paHeHHblM . bid farewell [bid .fE'wel] - npow.aTbc bronze [br3nz] - 6POH30Bbli1 bureau ['bjuru] - 61Opo death-mask ['de ma:sk] - nocMepTHa MaCKa desk - ni1CbMeHHbli1 CTOJ1 embankment [im'brelJkmnt] - Ha6epe)l(Ha fireplace ['faipleis] - KaMH goose-quill pen ['gu:skwil pen] - pKa 3 ryCLt1- Horo nepa inkstand ['iIJkstrend] - YepHJ1bHi1u.a 1m EmD lock of hair [lk v hE] - npAb B0J10C locket ['13kit] - MeAaJlbOH mantelpiece clock ['mrentlpi:s] - KaMVlHHble 'iaCbl Negro boy ['nigru] - HerpTeHOK old - 3A. cTapHHbI rare [rE] - peAKVli1 repairs [ri'pEz] - peMoHT restore [ri'st:):] - BOCCTaHaBJ1i1BaTb spread [spred] (spread, spread) - pacnpOCTpa- Hffib( C) waistcoat ['weistkut] - )l(i1lleT 
I KEY -- - " '". lilt m MY3eii-KBapTMpa A. C. nYWKMHa MY3e paCn0110)l(eH Ha Ha6epe)l(HO MOKLt1. 12 B CaHKT-neTep6ypre  6blll OTKpblT B 1925 rOAY. nOST )l(Lt111 3AeCb C 12 ceHT6p 1836 rOAa AO cBoe CMepT 12 HBap 1837 rOAa. CKop6Ha BeCTb 0 TOM, TO nYWKlt1H TSJ)I(e110 paHeH, pacnpOCTpaHlt111aCb no ro- POAY cpa3Y )l(e. OH YMep ABYM AHMlt1 cnYCT. TbIClt1 11IOAe W111t1 K AOMY. T06bl npOCTlt1TbCfI CO CBOM 11106Lt1MbIM n03TOM. B 1987 rOAY MY3e 6bl11 BOCCTaHOB11eH nOC11e AJlLt1Te11bHbIX peMOHTHblX pa60T. K CO)l(aJleHlt1IO, COXpaHLt1JlOCb HeMHoro Bew.e nYWKLt1Ha. lt1 60JlbWafi Lt1X yaCTb HaxOALt1TC B Ka6Lt1HeTe. rAe OH YMep. Ka6Lt1HeT - 60JlbWafl, CBeTJlafi Lt1 Lt1CTafi KOM- HaTa. B HeM nLt1CbMeHHbl CTOll C KpeCJlOM, KHLt1)1(Hble CTeJlJla)l(Lt1 C YeTblpbMfI TblCfI- aMlt1 KHlt1r Ha 14 3bIKax, nLt1CbMeHHoe 6IOPO, KaMLt1H C yaCaMLt1, nOKa3bIBalOLlJ,lt1Mlt1 BpeMfi CMepTlt1 n03Ta. 3Aecb MO)l(HO YBLt1AeTb lllt1CTbl 6YMarlt1, KHlt1r, PYKY 3 ryClt1- Horo nepa lt1 6pOH30BYIO yepHLt1JlbHLt1LJ.Y C <prypo Herplt1TeHKa. ct>rypa HanOMHa- l1a eMY 0 Belllt1KOM npaAeAe 6parMe raHHlt16alle. B Ka6HeTe - nopTpeTbl APY3e-nosToB - AHToHa AellbBLt1ra. EBreHLt1f1 6apa- TblHCKoro Lt1 BaCLt1llLt1f1 )f(YKoBcKoro. KHlt1)1(Hble CTelllla)l(Lt1 C pa3JlLt1YHbIMLt1 KHLt1raMlt1 aaHLt1MalOT MHoro MeCTa. np )f(Lt13HLt1 nOST YBJleKallCfI K0l1lleKLJ.Lt10Hlt1pOBaHLt1eM CTaplt1HHbIX Lt1 peAKLt1X KHLt1r. B XOJll1e nOCeTLt1TeJlLt1 MOryT YBLt1AeTb )l(lt1l1eT. KOTOpbl 6blJl Ha HeM OAeT 80 Bpe- Mfl AY3ll. nocMepTHYIO MacKY Lt1 MeAallbOH C npfiAblO BOllOC. TYPlt1CTbl Lt13 pa3Hbix CTpaH MLt1pa nocew.alOT Lt1 BOCXLt1w.aIOTCfI MY3eeM-KBapTtI1- po nYWKlt1Ha. ECJlLt1 Bbl 6YAeTe B CaHKT-neTep6ypre, 06SJ3aTeJlbHO CXOALt1Te 8 3TOT MY3e . 17. npolfMTaMTe, nO)KanYMcTa, M cpaBHMTe PYCCKMM M aHrnMM- CKM BapMaHT CTMxoTBopeHMR. BcnoMHMTe, KTO HanMcan MY3blKY K HeMY. EcnM BaM nOHpaBMnCR aHrnM£1cKM CTMX, BbI- YIfMTe ero. Those evening bells By Thomas Moor Be'lepHMM 3BOH TOM8C Mop Those evening bells! those evening bells! How many a tale their music tells Of youth, and home. and that sweet time When last I heard their soothing chime! BelfepHti 3BOH, BelfepHti 3BOH! KaK MHoro AYM HaBOAT OH o IOHblX AHS1X B KpalO POAHOM. rAe S1 111061'111, rAe OTlfti AOM,  KaK S1, C HM HaBeK npocTS1Cb, TaM cl1ywal1 3BOH B nocl1eAHti pa3! Those joyus hours are pass'd away And many a heart. that then was gay, Within the tomb now darkly dwells And hears no more those evening bells! Y>Ke He 3peTb MHe CBeTl1blX AHet1 BeCHbl 06MaHlfBoti Moeti!  CKOl1bKO HeT Tenepb B >KBbIX TorAa Becel1blX, M0I10AbIX!  KpenOK X Morl1bHbl COH - He Cl1blweH M BelfepH 3BOH. And so 'twill be when I am gone, That tuneful peal will still ring on, While other bards shall walk these dells, And sing you praise, sweet evening bells. Jle>KaTb  MHe B 3eM11e CbIPOti! Hanes YHbll1bl HaAO MHO B A011He seTep pa3HeceT; Apyroti neseLl no He npot1AeT I  Y>K He S1, a 6YAeT OH B pa3AYMbe neTb BelfepHt1 3BOH! nepeBOA VI. K03flOBa Thomas Moor, a close friend of G. Byron, was born in Dublin in 1779. Unit 8 1m 
18. npoBeAMTe AnSI aHrnM'IaH 3KCKYPCMIO no KpeMnlO Ha TeMY "KpeMneBcKMe KonoKona". Kremlin Bells The ringing of bells accompanied the whole life of Moscow in ancient days. Bells rang for invasions and during the frequent fires, in cases of popular up- risings, and to announce victories or holiday celebrations. Even today bells ring from the Kremlin's Spassky Tower. At present there are 29 ancient bells in the Moscow Kremlin. Some of them hang in the Belfry of "Ivan the Great" and in its surrounding buildings. The biggest bell weighing 65 tons 320 kg can be seen in the embrasure of the "Filaret building" which rises next to the Belfry under a golden dome. The bell is called the Assumption Day Bell. It was cast by Yakov Zavyalov with metal taken from an even older bell which used to hang in the building and was broken when the Bell Tower blew up in 1812. The most famous of all bells, the Tsar Bell, stands on the ground at the foot of the Belfry of "Ivan the Great", and is surrounded by people from morning till night. Its history, in brief outline, is the following. In 1730 Empress Anna Ivanovna ordered that a bell weighing 9,000 poods (126 tons) should be cast. Germain, the casting master of the French king, thought it was a joke. Ivan Motorin, the most famous casting master in Moscow in those days, dec- lared that it was possible. r 11 III , . I I " -. .1 I t nf I . .. , . . . . ,I I - r !l , II I I'  II I I J I '\ ,II .1.1 . , I I I I r , , .. . . . ( ! I I I I I ", ,.,. f- l. I I f. . , , .... tt II If I! i I I -- - WORDLIST accompany ['kAmpni] -COnpOBO)KJJ.aTb ancient ['einfnt] -ApeBHVI announce ['nauns] - co06w.aTb Assumption Day ['sAmpfn] -AeHb YcneHLt1 belfry ['belfri] - K0J10K0J1bH blow up [blu] - B3pblBaTb(c) cast [ka:st] (cast, cast)-J1l-1Tb, OTJ1BaTb (MeTaJIll) celebration [.seli'breif(  )n] - npa3AHOBaHl-1e declare [di'kle] - 3aBJ1Tb dome [dum] -t<ynOJ1, CBOA embrasure [im'brei3] - aM6pa3ypa Empress ['empris] - VlMnepaTpVla Em!] I!ImD I ,It" Ii · f °1 . j , foot [fut] - nOAHO)f(l-1e, Hl-1)f(HS1S1 aCTb frequent ['fri:kwent] - acTbli1 in brief outline [bri:f] - BKpaTLte, KOpOTKO, B 06w.Lt1x epTax invasion [in'vei3n] - HaweCTBe joke [ctuk] - wyTKa pood [pu:d] -nYA (Mepa Beca) ringing ['riIJil)] - 3BOH surround [s'raund] - OKp}I)KaTb surrounding [s'raundil)] - OKPY>KalOw.Vli1 uprising [Ap'raizil)] - BOCCTaHVle weighing ['weiil)] - Becw.i1i1 
--... :::. <..  AlII Tel. lITO l8'IeT JHm. 6DJ1 A special casting pit was dug in Ivanovskaya Square in the Kremlin. The pit was 10 metres deep. Much copper, tin and sulphur, as well as 72 kg of gold and more than 500 kg of silver were used. Ivan Motorin failed to finish the casting, and it was completed by his son Mikhail. Apart from all kinds of ornaments found on the bell, there is the follo- wing inscription: "This bell was cast by Russian craftsman Ivan Motorin, the son of Fyodor Motorin, and his son Mikhail Motorin." The casting was successful and finally the bell stood ready for lifting on an iron grating. During a very bad fire that raged in the Kremlin on May 29, 1737, the wooden building above the pit caught fire. People ran .to extinguish the fla- mes and poured water onto the burning log that had fallen into the pit. Due to uneven and fast cooling, the metal cracked and a fragment weighing 11.5 tons fell out. The bell remained in the pit for a hundred years. In the 19th century it was hoisted onto a white stone pedestal for public observation. Here are a few figures about the dimensions and weight of the giant. It is 6 metres 14 cm tall, has a diameter of 6 metres 60 cm, and weighs 202 tons 924 kg. Hence its name - the Tsar Bell. The National Treasure of Russia 1. The Depository's collection of historical and artistic pieces began to take shape in 1922. It comprised articles of jewelry from the eighteenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century and the Russian Crown Jewels, which were previously kept in the Diamond Room of the Winter Palace in St. Peter- sburg. These articles, known as the Russian Diamond Treasury, made up the nucleus of the future collection. 2. The Diamond Treasury is one of the world's major collections of unique precious stones and rare pieces of jewelry. It is one of the "big three" (the other are the Tower of London and the Teheran Markazi Bank): depositories holding exceptional treasures. 3. Intended by Peter I to store Russia's Crown Jewels, the Diamond Room held the tokens of Imperial power, of which the main were the crown, the orb and the sceptre. 4. The political significance and enormous value of the crown jewels, which were the symbol of power, necessitated special custody regulations. The list of officials responsible for their safe-keeping and their duties were specified in WORDLIST apart from ['pa:t] - He rOBOpS1 0, KpoMe burning ['b:nil)] - rOpS1Ll.ll-1i1, nbl11alOLl.llt1i1 catch [kretf] fire (caught [k:t]) - 3aropeTbCS1 complete [km'pli:t] -3aBepwaTb cooling ['ku:l iJ)] - OXJlIDK,lJ.eHl-1e copper ['kp] - MeAb crack [krrek] -TpeCKaTbCS1, pacKMbIBaTb(cS1) craftsman ['kra: ftsm n] - peMeC11eHHl-1K, MaCTep deep [di:p] - r11y60Kl-1i1. rJ1y6l-1Ha diameter [dai'remit] -AL-1aMeTp dig [dig] (dug, dug) - pblTb, KonaTb (dig up - OT- KanbiBaTb) dimension [di'menf()n] -pa3Mepbl, BeJ1V1VlHa due to [dju:] - Vl3-3a extinguish [iks'tiJ)gwin - raCVlTb. ryWVlTb fail [feil] - He CYMeTb (CAeJ1aTb TO-11V160) figure ['fig] - u.L-1cJ>pa flame [fleim] - n11aMS1 fragment ['frregmnt] -ct>parMeHT, OCK0J10K grating [greitil)] - peweTKa hence [hens] - OTCIOAa hoist [hist] - nOAHLt1MaTb (rpY3) inscription [in'skripf(  )n] - H(lAnViCb observation [.bz'veifn] - Ha611IOAeHVle ornament [':nmnt] -YKpaweHVle, opHaMeHT pedestal ['pedistl] - nbeAeCTM, OCHOBaHVle pit [pit] - S1Ma rage [rei] - 6yweBaTb, CBVlpenCTBOBaTb remai n [ri 'n1 e in] - OCTaBaTbCS1 successful [sk'sesful] -ycnewHbli1. YAaYHbl£1 sulphur ['sAlf] - cepa tin - 0110BO uneven LAn'i:vn] - HepaBHoMepHbl£1 wooden [wud n J - AepeBS1HHbli1 I!lmD fm 
Badge of St. Andrew Order The grand Imperial Chain with St. Andrew Order .. . . # y " '" " r # - ,.. ., ."... Minor Imperial Crown -4 .. .... . , . ...... ... '- )  . --.  .. -- . ....-."V. . ..:'. + --. . . "- . }o.' .. . . I ¥ . i.... -:c.: ...  ... \.. \... ; .."".ti. , ,,. , ...  't' " .., .. ,." .. - .. . t, ....:<  ,( t" .J. .. :. ; !/r' t}  't. .-\ \\.. -.L '', \ -,. . J - '..f'  1,1 , \ " .. . " . I J .\ ! t , \ (, \. 1 .. . ?  'i. l \  · ... '".. . ..... .1... "t' _' 1 " :t-1..\{ ., J"I '.J "T. ..,. .II.:,.!" ....... '- . "' . ... . " .*" . . . . , '. · t... '. ... .;. I( '" t ( . \ Co Star of St. Andrew Order \' 1{.1 .-.. .. r  .... , .  . - . t. , ..... ... Large Clasp-Agrafe ukasy issues by Peter I in 1719; for example, each of the officials had to secure the treasury doors with its own lock. But in the years that followed the monarchs began to use pieces from the Diamond Room to bestow gifts of various kinds, including gifts to high-placed persons abroad; some of the articles were redesigned according to current fashions and some were sold. 5. After the outbreak of World War I in August 1914 the stock of the Di- amond Room was taken to Moscow along with some of the other treasures so as to forestall the possible threat Petrograd. From 1914 to 1920 valuab- les from the palaces and country estates of the Russian Imperial family were also brought to Moscow. A large part of these was installed in the Armoury Chamber of the Moscow Kremlin. 6. But in 1927 and 1932, in keeping with the rulings of the USSR Council of People's Commissars and the Board of the State Bank of the USSR, some of the treasures were sold abroad. 7. Along with the famous pieces crafted in the eighteenth and ninete- enth centuries, this display includes unique selections of nuggets, magnifi- cent specimens of uncut diamonds from Yakutia and gemstones from the Urals, East Siberia and other sites, which the Depository received from the 1930s to the 1990s. There is also a new line: jewelry crafted in our own time; many of the pieces, specially designed for the display by masters from the Depository's own workshop, the pieces are remarkable for their technical excellence. 8. In the 1980s and the following decade a full-fledged collection of art objects began to take shape on the basis of the Depository's stock. It in- cludes exhibits by Russian and foreign jewellers, gold and silver tableware, and decorative appointments from the mid-eighteenth century to the 1980s. fI!B Unit 8 
I KEY II HaMOHanbHaR COKpOBMI1I.HMa POCCMM 1. KOJlJleKu, CToplieCKX  xYAO>KeCTBeHHblx u,eHHocTe£1 r oCYAapcTBeHHoro XpaHJlw.a HaliaJla CKJlaAbIBaTbC B 1922 rOAY. KOllIleKu. BKlltOliana B ce6 npo- 3BeAeH tOBeIlpHoro CKyccTBa XVIII - nepBo£1 nOllOBHbl XIX BeKa  KOPOHbl POCC£1CKO£1 it1Mnep, KOTopble AO SToro XpaHJlCb B 6pJlIlaHTOBo£1 KOMHaTe 3MHero ABopu,a B neTep6ypre. aT COKpoBw.a. nOllYliBwe Ha3BaHe Pocc£1- CKoro AnMa3Horo cpOHAa, CTall APOM 6YAYW.e£1 KOllIleKu,. 2. AnMa3Hbl£1 CPOHA - OAHO 3 Ha6011ee 3Ha4TeJlbHbIX B Mpe c06paH£1 YHVI- KaJlbHblX Aparou,eHHblX KaMHe£1  peAlia£1wx TBopeH£1 tOBellpHoro CKyccTBa. HapAY C 60raTcTBaM nOHAOHcKoro Tayspa  6aHKa MapKaa B TerepaHe AIlMa3- Hbl£1 CPOHA POCCit1 BXOAT B COCTaB "60Ilbwo£1 Tpo£1K" COKPOBW.HU., B KOTOpOM xpaHTC YHKallbHble u.eHHOCT. 3. B 6pIlIlit1aHTOB0£1 KOMHaTe, aaAYMaHHo£1 neTpoM I KaK xpaHIlw.e COKpO- Bit1W. KOPOHbl POCCit1£1CKO£1 II1Mnep, XpaHllit1Cb CMBOIlbl it1MnepaTopcKo£1 BllaC- T, rIlaBHbIMit1 CpeAit1 KOTOpblX 6b1Ilit1 KopOHa, Aep>KaBa it1 CKneTp. 4. nOllTit1lieCKa 3Haliit1MOCTb it1 orpOMHa u,eHHOCTb 3TX COKPOBW., KOTopble 6b11l CMBOIlaMit1 BIlaCT, 06YCIlOBIlit1 oc06yIO Tw.aTellbHOCTb x xpaHeH. Cn- COK IlU" OTBeTCTBeHHblX 3a coxpaHHocTb COKPOBW., it1 it1X 063aHHocT 6b1Il on- peAeIleHbl B YKaae, aAaHHOM neTpoM I B 1719 rOAY; HanpMep. Ka>KAbl£1 3 OTBeT- CTBeHHblX 1lU, AOJl>KeH 6bl1l 3anit1paTb ABep COKPOBW.HU,bl Ha cBo£1 3aMOK. OAHaKo B nOCJleAYIOw.e rOAbl KopoHoBaHHble OC06bl Haliallit1 cnOIlb30BaTb COKpoBw.a 6pJlJlaHTOBo£1 KOMHaTbl AJl pa3Horo pOAa AapOB, B TOM 4CIle Ait1n1l0MaTlieCKX; HeKOTopble Bew. nepeAeIlblBaIlCb B COOTBeTCTBit1 C Tpe60- BaHM MOAbl, a'HeKOTOpble npoAaBaIlcb. 5. nOcIle Halialla nepBo£1 MPOBO£1 Bo£1Hbl. B CB3 C yrpoao£1 neTpOrpClJJ.Y, B aBrycTe 1914 rOAa COKpOBit1w.a 6pIlllaHTOBo£1 KOMHaTbl BMeCTe C liaCTbfO APY- rx Aparou,eHHocTe£1 6b1Jl nepeBeaeHbl B MocKBY. B nepOA C 1914 no 1920 rOA Aparou,eHHocT a ABOPU,OB  aaropoAHblX MeHit1£1 POCC£1CKO£1 MnepaTopCKo£1 ceMb 6b1Jl TalOKe nepeBe3eHbi B MOCKBY. 3HaliTeJlbHYtO liaCTb u,eHHOCTe£1 no- MeCTll B MocKOBCKOM KpeMlle, B 3AaH OPY>Ke£1HO£1 naJlaTbl. 6. Ho B 1927 it1 1932 rOAax, B COOTBeTCTBit1it1 C peweHM COBeTa HapoAHblX KOMccapoB CCCP  npaBlleH rOc6aHKa CCCP, liaCTb xYAO>KeCTBeHHblx u,eH- HocTe£1 AIlMa3Horo <poHAa 6blIla npOAaHa aa rpaHit1u,y. 7. HapAY C 3BeCTHbIM 3KcnOHaTaM, coaAaHHblM B XVIII-XIX BeKax, 3Ta 3KCn03it1u, BKlltOliaeT YHit1KaIlbHble KOIllleKu.it1 caMopoAKOB Aparou,eHHblx MeT all- 110B it1 Bellit1KOllenHble 06paau,bl Kpit1CTaIlIlOB KYTCKX allMaaoB, u.BeTHblx Aparo- u.eHHblx KaMHe£1 MeCTOpO>KAeH£1 YpaIla, BOCTOliHO£1 C6pit1  APyrx perit10HOB cTpaHbl, nOCTynit1BWX B rOxpaH B nepit10A 1930-1990-x rOAOB. Cyw.eCTByeT TalOKe HOBoe HanpaBJleHe - Aparou,eHHble 3AeIlit15t. C03AaHHbie B Haw AHit1; MHore it13 Hit1X coaAaHbl cneu,it1aIlbHO AJl 3Kcnoau, tOBellit1paM 3 MaCTepCKo£1 roxpa- Ha. it13Aells:I OTIlit1liaeT BbICOK£1 YPOBeHb it1CnOJlHeHit1s:1. 8. B 80-e rOAbl B rOxpaHe Ha4alla CKllaAblBaTbCs:I KOlllleKu,it1S1 xYAO>KeCTBeHHblx u,eHHocTe£1. B Hee BOWllit1 npO3BeAeHs:I PyccKoro  3apy6e>KHOrO tOBeIlit1pHOrO it1CKyccTBa, 301l0Tbie  cepe6pHble CTOIlOBble np60pbl  AeKOpaTit1BHble YKpawe- Hit1s:1, Ha4Ha C CepeAit1Hbl XVIII BeKa AO 80-x rOAOB XX CTOlleT. HanMWMTe, 'ITO Bbl 3anOMHMnM M3 npO'lMTaHHoro. 06MeHSlMTeCb C BaWMM coceAOM no napTe TeM, 'ITO HanMcanM. I!lmD fm 
19. A Tenepb n03HaKOMbTeCb C KOnneKL\MeM PYCCKMX M coseTCKMX oPAeHoB B CTOpM'IeCKOM MY3ee B MocKBe. Russian Orders 1. The State Historical Museum is one of the world's biggest repositories of historical relics. The Museum's numismatic collection is of world importance. numbering more than 1.5 million objects - medals. orders, coins, paper money, etc. 2. The Russian award system originated almost simultaneously with the formation of the Russian state. The customs of awarding a special sign of dis- tinction for military exploits, a neck gold ugrivna" (medallion), existed in Kiev Russ already in the 11th-12th centuries. Later, in the 15th-16th centuries, the tradition of the mass awarding of special medals to all participants in a campa- ign originated in Russia, and it was the only country in the world at the time to do so. The award was presented to all the participants in the event irrespective of deg ree of participation. 3. In England, for instance, the first mass awarding of a specially minted medal to the participants in a battle was recorded only in 1670. As to other countries, they resorted to this practice even later, only in the middle of the 18th century. The first Russian order, that of St. Andrew, was instituted at the very close of the 17th century. Peter the Great indicated who was eligible for this order and for what: U.. . To some as an appreciation of and award for loyalty, courage and various services to us and the country." -4.,.. I , tI, "1 " ..,. \ 'A.. -. ,' ..  ", 'II o. ."'"  c' ... .  "t1GaG I r 1)' . .. . J'  ..t, 't! ...\., - '*' jin\\\\   . . . . . ., ': ,,., ,. -: 1..' ,., · (t.  ..... . . . ... ..... . ". .  . - . -- . -.w.e -- - } (.o J1 X /) ,\' 'l O <....  r '1.. J ......-   1\ . "'e . 0. 'T ..., \ " I - , -'/ '- . From left to right: Star of S1. Andrew Order, Badge of S1. Andrew Order, The S1. Catherine Order, Order of Suvorov, Star of St. George, Badge of S1. George (George Cross), Order of Alexander Nevsky, Order of the Red Banner of Labour. fm I!linD 
Peter himself received the St. Andrew Order only five years after it was instituted - for military exploit in 1703. In May of that year Russian Guards infantrymen approached in rowing boats two ships Swedish, one armed with ten guns and the other with fourteen. The Russian captured them although being armed only with muskets and sabres. The operation was commanded by the emperor himself. Peter the Great won the award for this action. 4. The famous Battle of Poltava between Russian and Swedish troops took place in June, 1709, and sealed the outcome of the difficult Northern War that Russia had been conducting to secure an outlet into the Baltic Sea. The entire Russian artillery in that battle was commanded by one of Peter's closest associates, General Yakov Vilimovich Bruce. The latter was one of the few military commanders to receive the St. Andrew Order for the victo- rious Battle of Poltava. The star of the St. Andrew Order, which belonged to General Bruce, is now on display at the Museum. It is the only surviving Rus- sian star of the first half of the 18th century. 5. The St. Catherine Order for women appeared in Russia during Peter's reign. It was instituted in memory of events connected with the unsuccessful Prut campaign undertaken by the Russian army in 1711. This order was presented to a male only once - to Alexander, the 13-year- old son of A. D. Menshikov, for his extremely shy, Ufemale" character. 6. Peter the Great also instituted another order for outstanding military distinctions and it was named after the famous Russian military commander Alexander Nevsky. 7. But the idea of an award presented exclusively for military services had not been forgotten and the St. George Order was instituted in 1769. The Museum's Department of Numismatics has a precious relic - the star and ribbon of orders of George which General Suvorov himself had worn. 8. A special George Cross made of silver was instituted early in the 19th century for soldiers and non-commissioned officers. This cross, for instance, was awarded to the famous ucavalry woman" N. A. Durova who began her mi- litary service as an uhlan and later became the first woman officer in the Rus- sian army. 9. The award system in tsarist Russia was of a markedly class nature. 10. The Soviet award system fundamentally differs from the tsarist one. 11. The first Soviet republican order appeared in Azerbaijan. 12. The All-Union Order of the Red Banner of Labour was introduced in 1928. The Order of Lenin, the supreme award in the country, was instituted on April 6, 1930. 13. The highest signs of distinction in the USSR - the titles of Hero of the Soviet Union and Hero of Socialist Labour were introduced in the USSR in the 1930s. Additional signs of distinction - the Gold Stars of Hero of the Soviet Union and Hero of Socialist Labour were instituted somewhat later. 14. Several military awards appeared in the course of the Soviet Union's Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. As a rule, the new awards were named after outstanding military commanders of our country. Instituted, thus, were the combat orders of Suvorov, Kutuzov, Alexander Nevsky and Bogdan Khmelnit- sky. Two orders named after our great admirals F. F. Ushakovand P. S. Nak- himov were awarded to officers and admirals of the Soviet Navy. I!ImD fI!m 
I KEY M3 MCTOpMM PYCCKMX OPAeHOB 1. rOCYAapcTBeHHblt1 cTopVlllecKVlt1 Myaet1 flB/1f1eTCfI OAHVlM Via KPynHewVlx B MVipe XpaHVI/1V1w. VlcTopVlllecKVlx' pe/1V1KBVlt1. HYMVlaMaTVIlIecKafi KO/1/1eKUVlfl Myaefl VlMeeT MVipOBoe aHalleHVle VI HaClIVlTblBaeT CBblwe nO/1yropa MVI/1/1V10HOB npeAMeToB - MeAaJle, OPAeHOB, MOHeT, 6YMa)f(HbIX AeHe)f(HbIX aHaKOB VI T. A. 2. PyccKafi HarpaAHafi CVlCTeMa BoaHVlKlla nOllTVI OAHOBpeMeHHO C 06pa30BaHVI- eM PYCCKoro rOCYAapCTBa. Y)f(e B XI-XII BB. B KVleBCKO PYCVI cyw.eCTBOBa/1 06bl- lIat1 HarpIDf<JJ.aTb aa BoeHHble nOABVlrVl OC06blM aHaKOM OT/1V1l1V1f1 - a0/10Tot1 we- HOt1 rpVlBHO. B Aa/1bHet1weM, B XV-XVI BB., Ha PYCVI BoaHVlKaeT OTcyrcTBoBaBWVl B APyrVlx CTpaHax MVipa TOro BpeMeHVI o6blllat1 MaCCOBoro Harpa>KAeHVlfI Bcex YlIaCTHVlKOB Toro VI/1V1 VlHoro nOXOAa OC06blMVI HarpaAHblMVI aHaKaMVI - MeAa/lMVI. HarpaAY nO/1YlIa/1V1 Bce YlIaCTHVlKVI C06bITVI, HeaaBVlCVlMO OT CTeneHVI YlIaCTVI B HeM. 3. B AHr/lVlVl, HanpVlMep, nepBoe MaCCOBoe Harpa)f()J.eHVle Bcex YlIacTHVlKoB Cpa)f(eHVlfI Cne4V1a/1bHO OTlIeKaHeHHblMVI MeAa/1f1MVI 6bl/10 OTMeLieHO /1V1Wb B 1670 rOAY. B APyrVle CTpaHbl 3TOT 06blllat1 npVlwe/1 ew.e n03)f(e, /1V1Wb B cepeAVlHe XVIII CTO/1eTVlSL B caMOM KOHue XVII B. 6bl/1 YlIpe)I(.QeH nepBblt1 PYCCKVI OPAeH CB. AHApefi nep- B03BaHHoro. CaM neTp YKaaa/1 KOMY VI 3a LITO AO/1)f(Ha BoaAaBabCfI 3Ta HarpCiAa: "B BoaAaflHVle VI HarpIDf<JJ.eHVle OAHVlM aa BepHOCTb, xpa6pOCTb VI pa3Hbie HaM VI OTe- lIeCTBY aaC/1yrVl". CaM neTp nO/1YlIVi/1 OPAeH AHApefi /1V1Wb lIepea nflTb /1eT nOC/1e ero yrBep)I()J.e- HVlfI, B 1703 rOAY, aa KOHKpeTHblt1 BoeHHblt1 nOABVIr. B Mae 3Toro )f(e rOAa CO/1Aa- Tbl PYCCKOt1 rBapAet1cKo neXOTbl nOAn/1bl/1V1 Ha ABYX BeCe/1bHbiX /10AKaX K ABYM wBeAcKVlM Kopa6/1f1M. Ha OAHOM AecflTb, a Ha APyrOM lIeTblpHaAuaTb OPYAVI. Pyc- CKVle B3f1/1V1 VlX Ha a60PAa)f(, 6YAYlIVI BOOPY)f(eHbl OAHVlMVI /1V1Wb MywKeTaMVI VI wna- raMVI. PYKOBOAVI/1 onepaUVle caM neTp I. 3a 3TOT 60 neTp 6bl/1 YAocToeH 3T0t1 HarpaAbl. 4. B VltOHe 1709 rOAa npOVl30W/l0 3HaMeHVlToe nO/1TaBCKOe Cpa)f(eHVle Me>KAY PYCCKVlMVI VI WBeACKVlMVI BocKaMVI, npeApewVlBwee VlCXOA TfI)f(e/10 CeBepHot1 BOt1Hbl, KOTOPYtO Be/1a POCCVlfI aa BblXOA K 6a/1TVlt1cKOMY MOPtO. Bcet1 PYCCKO ap- TVi/1/1epVlet1 B 3TOM 60tO KOMaHAOBa/1 OAVlH Via 6/1V1)f(at1wVlx CnOABVI)f(HVIKOB neTpa I reHepa/1 KOB BVI/1V1MOBVIlI 6ptOc. . B. 6ptOC B lIVlC/1e HeMHorViX BOeHallaJIbHVlKOB 6bl/1 Harpa>KAeH oPAeHoM AHApe nepBoaBaHHoro aa n06eAY B nO/1TaBcKot1 6V1TBe. 3Be3Aa oPAeHa AHApe nepB03BaHHoro, KOTopa npVlH8Af1e)f(a/1a reHepa/1Y 6ptO- cY. 3KcnoHVlPyeTcfI Tenepb B MY3ee. 3TO eAVlHCTBeHHa PyccKafi 3Be3Aa nepBo nOl1OBVlHbl XVIII CTOl1eTVlfI, coxpaHVlBwaflcfI AO HawVlX AHe. 5. npVl neTpe I B POCCVlVI nOflBVll1CfI )f(eHCKVI OPAeH CB. EKaTepVlHbl, YLlpe)f(AeH- Hbll:1 B naMflTb Co6bITVll:1, CBfl3aHHbiX C HeYAallHblM npYTCKVlM nOXOAOM PYCCKO apMVlVI B 1711 rOAY. 1I13BecTeH /1V1Wb OAVlH c/1YlIa Harpa)f(AeHVI 3TVlM oPAeHoM MY)I(lIVlHbl - ero nOllYlIVi/1 TpVlHaAuaTVI/1eTHVI CblH A. A. MeHwVlKoBa A/1eKCaHAP 3a He06blLlat1Ho 3acTeHlIVlBblt1, ")f(eHCKVI" xapaKTep. 6. neTpoM I 6bl/10 3CiAYMaHo YlIpe>KAeHVle ew.e OAHoro OPAeHa, npeAHa3HaLiaB- weroc B HarpClAY /1V1Wb 3a BoeHHble OT/1V1l1V1 VI nO/1YlIViBwero VlMfI 3HaMeHVlToro PyccKoro nO/1KOBOAua A11eKcaHApa HeBcKoro. 7. VlAe Harpa)I()J.eHVI VlCKJltOlIViTellbHO 3a BoeHHble 3acllyrVl He 6bll1a 3a6blTa,  B 1769 rOAY 6bl/1 YlIpe>KAeH OPAeH CB. reoprVl. B OTAelle HYMVl3MaTVlKVI MY3efl xpaHVlTcfI AparoueHHa pellV1KBVI - 3Be3Aa 1-1 lleHTa oPAeHa reoprVlfl, KOTopble HOCVll1 caM A. B. CYBOpOB. 8. OC06bll:1 cepe6pflHbll:1 reoprVleBcKVlt1 KpeCT 6blll YlIpe>KAeH B HaLialle XIX B. All Harpa)f(AeHVI COllAaT VI YHTep-0<f>Vl4epOB. MeHHo 3T0l:1 HarpaAbl 6bl/la YAocToeHa 3HaMeHVlTafi "KaBal1epVlcT-AeBVlua" H. A. AYPoBa, HallaBwa BoeHHYIO Em) ImnD 
cll6y PAOBbIM YllaHOM 1I1 CTaBWa BnOClleACTBlI1l11 nepBot1 B POCClI1t1CKOt1 apMlI1l11 )f(eHw.lI1Hot1-0<p1I1 u.epOM. 9. HarpClAHa ClI1CTeMa u.apcKot1 POCClI1l11 HOClI1lla pKO Bblpa)f(eHHbl Kllacco- Bbl xapaKTep. 1 O. HarpaAHa ClI1CTeMa COBeTcKoro rocYAapcTBa OTllll1aeTC OT u.apcKo ClI1C- -TeMbl. 11. nepBblt1 cOBeTCK!A pecny61l1l1KaHCKiI1£1 OPAeH nOBiI1IlC B A3ep6a£1A>f(aHe. 12. B 1928 rOAY 6blll BBeAeH o6w.ecoI03Hbl£1 OPAeH TpYAoBoro KpacHoro 3Ha- MeHlI1 CCCP. nOcTaHOBlleHlI1eM npe3111AlI1YMa UV1K CCCP OT 6 anpell 1930 rOAa 6blll ype)f(- AeH OPAeH JleHlI1Ha - Bblcwa HarpaAa CTpaHbl. 13. 8 30-e rOAbl 6blll1l1 BBeAeHbl BblCWll1e CTeneHlI1 OTllll1lI1 CCCP - 3BaHlI1 repo COBeTcKoro COt03a 1I1 repo Cou.lI1aJlll1CTlI1eCKOro TpYAa. 14. PA HOBblX 60eBbix HarpClA nOBlI1JlC B XOAe Bellll1KO OTelfecTBeHHo BO- Hbl COBeTcKoro COlO3a 1941-1945 rr. KaK npaBlI1ll0. HOBbie HarpaAbl nOIlYlfall lI1MeHa Bellll1KiI1X nOIlKoBoAu.eB Hawe CTpaHbl: CYBopOBa. KyrY30Ba. AneKcaHApa HeBCKoro. 60rAaHa XMellbHlI1u.Koro. ABa OPAeHa. nOIlYiI1BWlt1e It1MeHa HaWlI1X Bellll1- KIt1X <pIlOToBoAu.eB q,. q,. YwaKoBa It1 n. C. HaXIt1MOBa. BPyallll1Cb ocpll1u.epaM lI1 ap.- Mlt1pallaM COBeTcKoro BoeHHo-MopcKoro q,1l0Ta. 20. npeAcTaBbTe, 'I TO Bbl OTKpblsaeTe CTOp'fe.cKMM MY3eM CBO- ero KpaSi. nOArOTOSbTe 3KcnOHaTbl: peenTbl KywaHMM, npM- HSlTblX y sac, MOAenM HapSlAHOM OAe)l(Abl, pa3b1rpaMTe CBa- Ae6HblM 06PSlA, npHSlTbIM B saweM Kpae. >KenaeM ycnexa! Unit 8 fIiJ 
ENVIRONMENT NO ECOLIG Ecology is the science of how living things are related to their environment. Many Americans are concerned about their ecology today. They are concer- ned about protecting the environment from pollution, overcrowding, and des- truction of natural resources. I  I Ir f!;; i 1 \\ALk1 , ..  I I _, I . {  . .  I   "f f "' .\ , 'I !!!' ;""'i;" ....- ..,,' ..--.... \to.. .1.1)  - #.:-.. ,.' -  '1'" t Ij. r 4 "', i,; ,_ I" , . ," I  L . I / \ L' "'II"',  . . .. . .. .  L't..., . "". (J ..... , ..  ; I  1 . r t 1 ....i. ,-. "'\ -  L.. \ I... ,\ -a 'I : , ". t o ) y"- --- ,;. ,. ,-\. ,\ .... ,"v, -- f , .  v { 7 -.__ r-   I .r I . L - ; _ (C:::  Jgj - -', !i . = la -=-   1 1 G.!i! ' - _ ....., "'J'..)(T  --. - ,F=--7 ==-= -  h r?'\"\=::1 , 11 ",T II r r f I -'A These are the names of the environmental problems of today: - Littering - Air pollution, smog - Water pollution - Overcrowding, overpopulation - Endangered species, animals which are almost extinct - Destruction of natural resources J_ :_"  ,  ,,- ! .:.-' :' .    . .-- .- . , . . . 10 . I ,-  ::s. -- ...... it.. " - . Questions: 1) Have you noticed any of these environmental problems where you live? 2) Which of these problems does your native country have? 3) What can be done to protect the environment? WORD LIST air [E] - B03AYX, aTMoccpepa be extinct [iks'tilJkt] - 6blTb BbIMepWLt1M be related [ri'leitid] - 6blTb CB3aHHbIM concerned [kn's:nd] -03a.60lfeHHbl destruction [dis'trAkf()n] - pa3pyweHVle, YHlfTO)f(eHVle ecology [i:'klcBi] - SK0J10rVl endangered [in'deincBd] -nOABep)f(eHHble onaCHocrn environment [in'vairnmnt] - oKPY>KalOU¥i cpeACl littering ['litarilJ] - 3acopeHVle natural resources ['nretf r( a ) 1 ri 's:siz] - npVlpOA- Hble peCYPCbl overcrowding ['auv'krudilJ] - nepeHaCeJ1eHVle, nepenOJ1HeHVle overpopulation ['auva,Ppju'leif( a)n] - nepeHace- J1eHHOCTb pollution [pa'] u:f( a)n] - 3arp3HeHe protecting [pra'tektilJ] -3aw.VlTa, oxpaHa smog [smg] -CMor, TYMaH c AbiMOM species ['spi:fi:z] - pa3HoBAHOCTVI, KJlaCCbl, POAbi , f1m] I!lmD 
Ecology suggests activity! 21. nepeBeAMTe M cAen3MTe o6paTHbiM nepeBOA, nO)l(anYMcTa. Recycle aluminium cans Making aluminium from recycled aluminium uses 90% less energy than making aluminium from scratch. In 1993 alone, aluminium can recycling saved more than 11 billion kilowatt hours of electricity, enough to supply the residential electric needs of New York City for six months. The energy saved from one recycled aluminium can will operate a television set for three hours. If you throw an aluminium can out of the train window, it will still litter the Earth up to 500 years later. When you toss out one aluminium can you waste as much energy as if you'd filled the same can half full of gasoline and poured it onto the ground. Recycle!!! I KEY nepepa6aTbiBaMTe anlOMMHMeBble 6aHKM np n011Y4eH a11IOMH5t 3 a11IOMHeBoro BTOpCblpb5t 3Hepr cn011b3Y- eTC5t Ha 90% MeHbwe, 4eM np n011Y4eH ero 3 a11tOMHeBo CTp}')KK. T011bKO B 1993 rOAY nepepa60TKa a11IOMHeBbIX 6aHoK C3KOHOMVl11a 6011ee 11 M1111OHOB KVl110BaTT-4aCOB 311eKTp03Hepr, AocTaT04Ho AJl5t 06ecne4eHVl5t 311eKTp4ecTBoM )f(11bIX KBapTanoB ropOAa HblO-C1opKa B Te4eHe 6 MeC5tLl.eB. 3Hepr5I, C3KOHOM11eHHa5t npVl nepepa60TKe OAHO anIOMHVleBo 6aHKVI, AaCT B03MO)f(HOCTb pa60TaTb OAHOMY Te11eB30PY B Te4eHe Tpex 4aCOB. EC11 Bbl Bbl6pocTe a11IOMHeBYtO 6aHKY 3 OKHa noe3Aa, 3TO 3arp5t3HT 3eM- 1110 Ha 500 11eT. KorAa Bbl Bbl6pacblBaeTe OAHY a11IOMHeBYIO 6aHKY, TO MO)f(eTe nOTep5tTb CT011bKO 3Hepr, KaK eC11 6bl Bbl Han011Hl1 3TY caMYIO 6aHKY Han0110BVlHY 6eH- 3V1HOM VI Bbl11Vl11Vl 6bl ero Ha 3eM11IO. Y4aCTBYTe B nepepa60TKe!!! 22. CAenaMTe nnaKaTbl "3KOHoMbTe 3HeprMIO!", "nepepa6aTbl- BaMTe!", "nepepa6aTblBaMTe anlOMMHMeBble 6aHKM!". OAMH - H3 PYCCKOM Sl3b1Ke, APyrMe - Ha aHrnMMCKoM. Pyc- CKMM nnaK3T nownMTe MeCTHblM BnaCTSIM. nonpocMTe MX op- raHM30BaTb MecTHblM nepepa6aTblBalOMM eHTp. Don't Buy Drinks in Plastic Bottles FACT: Americans use 2.5 million plastic bottles every year. These bottles can't be recycled and won't ever degrade. WHAT TO DO: Only buy soda and other drinks in aluminum cans or glass bottles. Buy milk or juice in cartons. Then recycle them. WORDLIST aluminium can Leelju'minjm keen] - aJ1IOMLt1He- Ba5J 6aHKa carton ['ka:tn] - 3A. naKeT degrade [di'greid] - pa3pywVlTb fill [fi1] - HanOnH5JTb gasoline ['gresli:n] - 6eH3V1H litter ['lit] - aarp5J3H5JTb operate ['preit] - npi'1BOAi'1Tb B Aei1cTBVle pour [p:x] - J1i'1Tb.. recycle [ri'saikl] - nepepa6aTbiBaTb residential Lrezi'denf{  )1] - )l(i'1J1ble KBapTaIlbl scratch [skrretf] - CTp}')KKa supply [s'plai] - 06eCneYLt1BaTb toss out [ts aut] - Bbl6pacblBaTb waste [weist] -TpaTVlTb, paCTOyaTb IJlmD mJ 
I KEY He nOKynaMTe HanMTKM B nnaCTMKOBblX 6YTbinKax CbAKT: AMepKaHu.bl cnollb3YIOT 2,5 MIlIlL10Ha nllaCTKOBbIX 6YTbillOK Ka)I(AblVi rOA. 3T 6yrblllK He MOryr 6blTb nepepa60TaHbl,  OH HKorAa He pa3pywalOTc . 'ITO p'EnATb: nOKynaViTe BOAY  APyre HanTK TOllbKO B alltOMHe- BblX 6aHKax ll CTeKJ1HHbIX 6yrblllKax, a MonOKO  COK - B naKeTax. 3aTeM nepepa6aTbiBaViTe X. Use paper, not plastic FACT: It takes a whole tree to make about 500 paper grocery bags. But plastic bags are worse because they can't be recycled, and the plastic will never decompose. t KEY '1cnonb3YMTe 6YMary, a He nnaCTMK CbAKT: LJ.elloe AepeBO TpaTTc A1l Toro, T06bl cAellaTb OKono 500 6y- Ma>KHbIX npoAYKTOBblX naKeTOB. nnacTKoBble naKeTbl xY>Ke, nOToMY TO x Hellb3 nepepa6aTbiBaTb  nllaCTK HKorAa He pa311araeTc. Recycle newspapers Recycled paper could easily be substituted for virgin paper in many cases without any loss of quality. Making newspaper from "old" paper uses 30% to 55% less energy than making paper from trees; and it reduces air pollution by 95%. REUSE OLD NEWSPAPERS!!! It takes an entire forest-over 500,000 tre- es - to supply Americans with their Sunday newspapers every week. Americans use 50 million tons of paper annually - which means we consu- me more than 850 million trees. That means the average American uses about 580 pounds of paper each year! Use less paper FACT: American offices throwaway enough paper every year to build a wall 12 feet high across the country. But, right now, we save 200 million of paper a year by recycling. . WHAT TO DO: Most paper thrown away in the office just has printing on one side. Ask your parents to bring home some of this paper so you can use the blank side for writing or drawing, or cut it into smaller sizes and staple it together to make note pads. FACT: It takes 500,000 trees just to make the newspapers we read every Sunday. WHAT TO DO: Save your family's newspapers. Find out how to recycle newspapers in your area. WORDLIST annually ['renjuli] - e>KerOAHO average ['rev rict] - CpeAHLt1 blank side [blrenk said] - YLt1CTa CTopOHa case [keis] - cJ1yYai1 consume [kn'sju:m] -3A. YHLt1YTO>KaTb decompose [.di:km'puz] - pa3J1araTbC entire [in'tai] - u.eJ1b1i1 loss [13s] - nOTep note pad ['nut 'pred] - 6J10KHOT office [':)fis] - KOHTopa paper grocery bag ['peip 'grusJri 'breg] - 6YMIDKHbli1 npoAYKTOBbli1 naKeT pollution [p'1 u:f{ )n] - 3arp3HeHe print [print] - neyaTaTb quality ['kw3liti] - KayeCTBO recycle [ri'saikl] - nepepa6aTbiBaTb save [seiv] - 3KOHOMTb staple [steipl] - CKpenJ1Tb substitute ['sAbstitju:t] - 3aMeHTb virgin paper ['v:ctin] - 3A. 6YMara, He nOABepraB- Wa51 nepepa60TKe whole [hul] - u.eJ1b1i1 om II!1DJD 
t KEY nepepa6aTbiBaMTe ra3eTbi nepepa60TaHHa 6YMara BO MHOrL-1X C11Y4aX MO:>KeT 11erKO 3aMeHL-1Tb 6YMary, He nOABepraBWYtOC nepepa60TKe, 6e3 nOTepL-1 Ka4eCTBa. Ha np0L-13BOACTBO ra3eT L>13 uCTapo" 6YMarL-1 TpaTL-1TC Ha 30-55% 3HeprL-1 MeHbwe, 4eM Ha np0L-13BOACTBO 6YMar L-13 ApeBeCL-1Hbl; 3TO CHL-1:>KaeT 3arp3HeHe B03Ayxa Ha 95%. cno11b3YTe BHOBb CTapble ra3eTbi. TpaTL-1TC u.e11bl 11ec - 6011ee 500 000 AepeBbeB - AJl Toro, 4T06bl cHa6>KaTb aMepKaHu.eB BOCKpeCHbIML-1 ra3eTaM KIDKAYtO HeAe11tO. AMepL-1KaHu.bl L-1Cn011b3YtOT 50 ML-11111L-10HOB TOHH 6YMarL-1 e>KerOAHO. 3TO 3Ha4T, 4TO Mbl YHL-14TO>KaeM 6011ee 4eM 850 ML-11111L-10HOB AepeBbeB. 3TO 3Ha4T, 4TO cpeA- HeCTaTL-1CTL-14eCK aMepL-1KaHeu. nOTpe611eT OK0110 580 <:PYHTOB 6YMarL-1 e)l(erOAHo! 3KoHoMbTe 6YMary tPAKT: AMepL-1KaHCKL-1e Y4peeHL-1 e>KerOAHO Bbl6pacblBatOT 6YMary, KOTOPO 6bl XBaTL-1110 AJl Toro, 4T06bl nOCTpOTb cTeHY 12 <:PYTOB BbICOTO BA011b Bce CTpaHbl. Ho npMO ce4ac Mbl 3KOHOML-1M 200 M1111L-10HOB B rOA C nOMObtO nepe- pa 60TKL-1. 'ITa EnATb: 6011bWa5t 4aCTb 6YMarL-1, Bbl6paCblBaeMa5t B Y4pe)I()J.eH, Me- eT TeKCT Ha OAHO CTopOHe. nonpOCTe CBOX pOAL-1Te11e npL-1HeCTL-1 AOMO 3TY 6YMary, 4T06bl Bbl MOr11L-1 L-1Cn011b30BaTb 4L-1CTYtO CTOPOHY AJl nCbMa L-111L-1 pL>1COBa- HL>1 11L-1 pa3pe3aTb X Ha 6011ee Me11Ke KYCKL>1 L>1 CKpenL-1Tb L-1X BMeCTe, 4T06bl no- 11Y4L-111L-1Cb 6110KHOTbl. tPAKT: TpaTTC5t 500 000 AepeBbeB npOCTO A115t Toro, '-IT06bl 4TaTb ra3eTbi KIDKAoe BOCKpeceHbe. 'ITa EnA Tb: COXpaH5tTe ra3eTbi Bawe ceMb. Y3HaTe, KaK nepepa6aTbl- BatOTC5t ra3eTbi TaM, rAe Bbl >KL-1BeTe. 23. Make two posters "Recycle newspapers": one in English and another in Russian. Send the Russian poster to your local government. Ask them to organize a local newspaper recyc- ling centre. Don't throw your old batteries in the trash FACT: Americans throw out 2.5 billion pounds of batteries a year. Toxic chemicals in batteries can be released into the environment, especially if they are burned. WHAT TO DO: Save your old batteries and take them to a recycling ce ntre . I KEY He Bbl6pacblBaMTe CTapble 6aTapeMKM C/JAKT: AMep1t1KaHbl Bbl6pacblBalOT 2,5 M1t1/l/l1t10Ha cPYHTOB 6aTapeeK 8 rOA. s:lAOB1t1Tble BeLU.eCTBa B 6aTapeKax MOryr nonaCTb B OKpy)I<alOLU.YIO cpe- AY, oc06eHHO eC/l 1t1X nOA>Keb. LITO p,EnA Tb: COXpaHftTe BaW1t1 cTapble 6aTapeK1t1 1t1 np1t1B031t1Te 1t1X B nepepa6aTbIBalOLU.1t1£:1 eHTp. WORDLIST battery ['bretri] - 6aTapei1Ka burn [b:n] - >KeYb chemicals ['kemik(  )lz] - XMLt1Kal1V1 environment [in'vairnmnt] - oKpy>KalOUJ,a51 cpeACl pound [paund] - Q>YHT (400 r) release [ri'li:s] - BbICB060>KJ].aTb throw out [eru aut] - BbJ6paCbIBaTb toxic ['t3ksik] - 5IAOBTblt1 trash [trreJ] - OTXOAbl I!mD fDI 
24. Make posters on every topic, for example, "Pick Up Litter." Pick up litter FACT: Litter is not only ugly, but it can be harmful to wildlife. Small animals can get hurt on sharp cans or broken bottles. WHAT TO DO: Pick up litter you see as you are walking. Throwaway trash. Recycle bottles and cans. t K nOA6MpaMTe MYCOP ClJAKT: Mycop He TOllbKO OTBpaTTelleH, HO  MO)l(eT np4HTb BpeA AKO nppOAe. MalleHbKe )I(BOTHble Moryr nopaHTbC OCTpbIM 6aHKaM  pa36- TbIM 6YTblllKaM. "ITa IJ,EnATb: nOA6paTe MYCOP, KOTOPbl Bbl BATe BO BpeM npory/lK. Bbl6pacblBaTe OTXOAbl. nepepa6aTblBaTe 6yrbl/lK  6aHK. Save water Find the Leaky Toilets in Your House. FACT: A leaky toilet can waste 20,000 gallons of water a year. That's eno- ugh to fill up a swimming pool. Find the leaky faucets in your house FACT: A leaky faucet can waste 3,000 gallons of water a year. WHAT TO DO: Check all the faucets in your house. Check the ones outside, too, where the garden hose is. Make sure that it is turned off, then watch for a minute to make sure that there are no drips. If there are, get someone to fix it. Water the lawn early in the morning FACT: If you water the lawn in the middle of the day when the sun is hot, most of the water evaporates before it gets to the roots. WHAT TO DO: It is best to water the lawn in the coolest part of the day. The best time to water is early in the morning, before the sun gets hot.  3KOHOMbTe BOAY HaMAMTe B BaweM AOMe TyaneTbl, B KOTOpblX npoTeKalOT 6a"lKM ClJAKT: npoTeKalOw. TyalleTHbl 6a4oK MO)l(eT nOTepTb 20 000 raJ1J10HOB BOAbl B rOA. SToro AOCTaT04HO AJl Toro, 4T06bl HanOJ1HTb nJ1aBaTellbHbl 6ac- ceH. HaMAMTe KpaHbl, KOTopble TeKyr B BaweM AOMe ClJAKT: TeKYw. KpaH MO)l(eT 3paCXOAOBaTb 3000 raJ1J10HOB BOAbl B rOA. "ITa p'EnATb: npoBepbTe Bce KpaHbl B BaweM AOMe. npOBepbTe X TalOKe CHapY)l(. rAe HaXOATc CaAOBbl WJ1aHr. Y6eAL-1TeCb, 4TO KpaH Ha HeM 3aKpblT, 3aTeM nOHa6J1IOAaTe B Te4eHVle ML-1HYTbl, 4T06bl y6eATbc, 4TO Vl3 W/laHra He KanaeT. ECllVi KanaeT, nonpOCTe KOrO-HL-16YAb n04HTb ero. WORDLIST drip [drip] - KanaHbe evaporate [i'vrepreit] - iJlCnapSlTbcSI faucet ['f:sit] - KpaH fill up - HanOJ1HiJlTb fix [fiks] - HTb gallon ['greln] - raJlJ10H (4.54 J1V1Tpa) get hurt [Iget h:t] - nOpaHiJlTb harmful ['ha:mful] - BpeAHbI hose [huz] - WJ1aHr lawn [l:n] - ra30H leaky ['li:ki] - npoTeKalOw.iJI litter ['lit] - MYCOP pick up ['pik lAp] - 3axBaTbiBaTb C c060i1 root [ru:t] - KopeHb sharp Ua:p] -OCTpbl ugly ['Agli] - OTBpaTiJlTeJ1bHbI water [IW:t ] - nOJ1iJ1BaTb fIB mJmD 
nonMBaMTe ra30Hbi paHO yrpOM CPAKT: ECll Bbl nOllBaeTe ra30H B cepeAHe AHS1, KorAa COllHue >KapKOe, 6011bwaS1 ljaCTb BOAbl cnapS1eTcS1 AO Taro, KaK Aoi:1AeT AO KopHei:1. liTO EnA Tb: J1Yljwe nOllTb ra30H B Ha6011ee npOXllaAHoe BpeMS1 AHS1. J1Yljwee BpeMS1 AJl nOllBK - 3TO paHo yrpOM AO BOCXOAa COllHUa. Turn out the lights and appliances when you are not using them FACT: The electric company burns coal to produce the energy that keeps your lights on. That burning coal gives off gases that cause the greenhouse effect and acid rain. WHAT TO DO: Turn off the lights when you leave the room, and turn off the lights in the room that you really don't need. In the daytime, sit closer to the window to read instead of turning on a light. Turn off the TV or the stereo when you aren't watching or listening. om BblKnlO"IaMTe CBeT M 3neKTponpM6opbl, KorAa Bbl MMM He nonb3yeTecb CPAKT: TenlloueHTpallb C>KraeT yrollb AJlS1 Taro, ljTo6bl Bblpa60TaTb 3HeprtO, KOTopaS1 AaeT CBeT B Baw AOMa. STaT C>KraeMbli:1 yrollb BblAellS1eT ra3bl, KOTO- pble AatOT napHKoBbli:1 3c:Pc:PeKT  KCllOTHbli:1 AO)I(Ab. Llro p'EnATb: BblKlltOljaTe CBeT, KorAa Bbl BbIXOATe 3 KOMHaTbl, a Haxo- AS1Cb B KOMHaTe, BblKlltOljaTe Te CTOljHK CBeTa, KOTopble BaM He HY>KHbl. AHeM. AJlS1 Taro ljTo6bl nOljTaTb, CC1ATeCb 611)f(e K OKHY, BMeCTO Taro ljTo6bl BKlltOaTb CBeT. BblKlltOljai:1Te TelleB30p ll nporpbIBaTellb. KorAa Bbl He CMOTpTe  He cllywaeTe. Life Skills Dear boys and girls! Take care of your motherland. Don't cut the wild flowers. They may all di- sappear. Plant one oak tree a year. From one oak a forest grows. It is very simple. Put one acorn ()I(eIlYAb) into the land. Never throw or break glass bot- tles. You damage the land. Take only what you need from the land. Give more to the land than what you take. Dmitry S. Krukov (Tatyana Klementyeva's Grandfather) 25. AonMwMTe, nO)l(anYMcTa, Te Ao6pble cOBeTbI, KOTopble AanM M AalOT 8aM 8aWM pOAHbie M 6nM3KMe. CnacM60. Y'IaCTBYMTe B oxpaHe npMpOAbl: HaATe Ha60Ilee 3arp3HeHHble MeCTa B Bawe oKpyre  c<t>oTorpa<t>- pYTe x. OpraH3YTe KaMnaHtO B CBoe WKOIle no x 04CTKe. CAeIlaTe nIlaKaTbl  np3blBbl AJl51 peKllaMbl Bawe KaMnaH no 04CT- Ke. cnoIlb3YTe AJl51 SToro <t>oTorpa<t>. HanWTe CTaTbtO B WKOJ1bHYIO ra3eTY. nOCTYnTe TaK, BeAb Bbl J1106Te CBOIO POAi'1HY! nYCTb SK0J10reCKe np06JleMbi CTaHYT AOCTOHeM rJ1aCHOCT, Bawe Ka>KAOAHeBHo 3a60To. fD] 
6. XopowaS1 nM y sac naMS1Tb? 3anonHMTe 3TOT nMCT. CHOICES OBJECTS ANSWERS 2 months traffic ticket 1 month 3 months -- up to 2 months banana peel up to 4 months up to 6 months 1 year wool sock . 4 years 3 years 6 years wooden stake 4 years 3 years 5 years wax paper cup 1 year 3 years 10 years painted wooden 15 years stake 13 years . 200 years tin can 1 00 years 150 years up to 300 years aluminum can up to 400 years plastic bottle up to 500 years forever glass container 1000 years 10 years Em I!mD . 
KEY HOW LONG LITTER LASTS traffic ticket.................................. 1 month banana peel................................. up to 6 months wool sock..................................... 1 year wooden stake ............................... 4 years wax paper cup.............................. 5 years painted wooden stake................... 13 years tin can.......................................... 1 00 years aluminium can, plastic bottle ......... up to 500 years glass containers ........................... forever 27. Listen, read and work with a partner. Write your ideas below. ee ing the Earth clean When air, land, or water becomes dirty, we say it is pol- luted. We know that polluted air, land, and water are harmful to plants, animals, and people. We are the ca- retakers of the earth. How can we keep our earth cle- an?  ( , . . , ,  "- WORDLIST air [E] - B03AYX aluminium ['relju'minjm] -aJlIOMHi1 below [bi'lu] - BH3Y, H>Ke can - >KeCT5IHa51 6aHKa caretaker ['k£,teik] - 6blTb OTBeTCTBeHHblM container [kn'tein] - KOHTeHep glass [gla:s] - CTeKJlO harmful rha: mful] - BpeAHbli1, nary6Hbli1 last [la:st] - AflTbC5I, npOAOJl>KaTbC5I peel [pi:l] - KO>KYpa plant [pla:nt] - paCTeHe plastic ['plrestik] - nJ1aCTMaccoBbli1 polluted [p'lu:tid] - 3arp5l3HeHHbli1 stake (steik] - KOll, CTOJl6 traffic ticket ['trrefik 'tikit] - npoe3AHoi1 6vIlleT wax [wreks] - BOCK wooden [wudn] - AepeB5IHHbli1 wool [wul] - wepCTb Unit 8 fIE) 
Plants are the basis of our life on Earth. Yet now, in Britain's countryside, wild plants are being destroyed on a scale never known before, by pollution, neglect and wanton habitat destruction. Meadows, heaths, hedges, bogs and woods - gone forever Each year 5,000 miles of hedgerow disappear - and the insects. birds and animals they support. Half our ancient woods have been destroyed; and, in the remainder, bluebells, wild daffodils and snowdrops are plundered for the horti- cultural trade. Plantlife's vital purpose Plantlife is Britain's only charity exclusively saving wild plants and the- ir habitats - from 121 m seashore to mountain top. Positive action by Plantlife Plantlife is busy. The highly successful "Back from the Brink" prog- ramme is saving plants threatened with extinction. You can help save many more. Plantlife is buying flower-rich meadows - plant nature reserves -to conserve cowslips, orchids and hundreds more species. Plantlife is campaigning to stop peatlands being destroyed. Plantlife needs you Anyone can join Plantlife - no need to be an expert. To help save our wild flo- wers. join Plantlife today. , .,  , ...... Save our wild flowers Destroyed since World War II 97% of our wildflower meadows 190,000 miles of hedgerow Half our ancient woodlands 75% of our heaths 98% of our unique lowland raised bogs, dug up for garden peat 22 flower species extinct since records began, 317 standing on the brink WORDLIST ancient wood ['einfnt 'wud] -ApeBHVI J1ec animal ['reniml] ->KVlBOTHOe basis ['beisis] - OCHOBa bird [b:d] - nTVlu.a bog [bg] - 60J10TO brink [bril)k] - Kpa, rpaHb countryside ['kAntrisaid] - CeJ1bCKa MeCTHOCTb daffodil ['drefdil] - HapuVlCC destroy [dis'tri] - pa3PywaTb, YHVlliTO>KaTb destruction [dis'trAkf{  )n] - pa3PyweHe, YHVlli- TO>KeHVle disappear Ldis'pi] - Clie3aTb extinct [iks'til)kt] - BblMpaTb habitat ['hrebitret] - MeCTO pacnpocTpaHeHVI, ec- TeCTBeHHa cpeAa heath [hi:8] - nycTowb, nopocwa BepecKoM hedgerow ['hecBru] - n0J1e3aw.VlTHa nOJ1oca horticultural Lh3:ti'kAltfr1] - CaAOBbli1 BE Unit 8 lowland ['lulnd] - AOJ1V1Ha, HVl3V1Ha meadow ['medu] -J1yr neglect [ni'glekt] - He6pe>KHOCTb plant [pla:nt] - paCTeHVle plunder ['plAnd] - pacxVlw.aTb pollution [p'l u:f( )n] - 3arp3HeHe record ['rek:d] - 3anVlCb, OTlieT remainder [ri'meind] - OCTaTOK save [seiv] -coxpaHTb, c6epelib scale [skeil] - MacwTa6 snowdrop ['snudr3p] - nOACHe>KHVlK species ['spi:fi:z] - BVlAbl support [Slp:t] -nOMoraTb, nOMep>KBaTb trade [treid] -TOprOBJ1 unique [ju:'ni:k] - YHKaJ1bHbli1 wanton ['wntn] - 6eCCMbICJ1eHHbli1, 6e30TBeT- CTBeHHbli1 wild [waild] - AKLt1i1 
  .... Tel. litO U"!T JIlin. 60nwuf npLo1Mep nopa3Lo1TeIlbHo SBOIlIOl\Lo1Lo1 C03HaHLo1: 200 IleT Ha3aA AMepLo1Ka npOB03rIlaCLo1Ila AeKllapal\Lo1IO He3aBLo1CLo1MOCTLo1, a ce4ac aMepLo1KaHCKLo1e SKO- 110rLo1 pa3pa60TaIl AeKllapal\Lo1IO B3aLo1M03aBLo1ClI1MOCTLo1 - OC03HaHLt1e Taro, 4TO Bce B ML1pe B3aLt1MOCB3aHO  cnaCTLo1 nIlaHeTy OT SK0110rLo14eCKoro KpLt13Lo1Ca Mbl MO>KeM TOl1bKO Bce BMeCTe. Declaration of Interdependence This We Know We are the earth, through the plants and animals that nourish us. We are the rains and the oceans that flow through our veins. We are the breath of the forests of the land, and the plants of the sea. We are human animals, related to all other life as descendants of the first- born cell. We share with these kin a common history, written in our genes. We share a common present, filled with uncertainty. And we share a common future, as yet untold. We humans are but one of thirty million species weaving the thin layer of life enveloping the world. The stability of communities of living things depends upon this diversity. Linked in that web, we are interconnected- using, cleansing, sharing and replenishing the fundamental elements of life. Our home, planet Earth, is finite; all life shares its resources and its energy from the sun, and therefore has limits to growth. For the first time, we have touched those limits. When we compromise the air, the water, the soil and variety of life, we steal from the endless future to serve the fleeting present. We may deny these things, but we cannot change them. WORDLIST animal ['reniml] ->KVlBOTHOe breath [breS] -AblxaHVle cell [se I] - KI1eTKa common ['kman] -06w.Vli1 community [ka'mju:niti] - 0611leCTBO compromise ['kmpramaiz] - CTaBVlTb nOA yrp03Y declaration LdekI'reiJ(  )n] - AeK/lapau.VlSJ deny [di'nai] -OTpVlaTb, He corllawaTbCSJ depend upon [di'pend a'pn] -3aBVIceTb OT descendant [di'sendant] - nOTOMOK diversity [dai'v:siti] - pa3Ho06pa3e element ['elimant] - SJ1eMeHT endless ['endlis] - 6eCKOHeYHbli1 envelop [in'velp] - oKPY>KaTb finite ['fainait] - OrpaHVlyeHHbli1 firstborn ['fa:stb:n] - nepBopoAHbli1 fleeting present ['fli:tilJ 'preznt] - CKOpOTeYHOe HacToow.ee flow [flau] (flew, flown)-TeYb, CTPYVlTbCSJ fundamental LfAnd'mentl] - OCHOBHOi1 gene [<t)i:n] - reH growth [gruS] - pa3BVlTVle human ['hju:man] -yeJ10BeyeCKVli1, yeJ10BeK interconnect Lintak'nekt] - CBSJ3blBaTb, coeAVlHSJTb interdependence (.intadi'pendans] - B3aIt1M03aB- CLt1MOCTb, B3aVlMOCBSJ3b kin-pOA, ceMbSJ, pOACTBO layer ['lei] - CllOi1, nllaCT limit ['limit] - npeAeJ1 link [lil)k] - CBSJ3blBaTb living thing ['livil) Sit)] - >KVlBOe cyw.eCTBO nourish ['nArin - KOpMVlTb plant [pla:nt] - paCTeHVle relate [ri'leit] - CBSJ3blBaTb replenish [ri'p Ie n in - nOnOJ1HSJTb resources [ri's:siz] -cpeACTBa, pecYPcbI serve [sa:v] - nOAXOAVlTb, rOALt1TbCSJ share Uea] - AeJ1, It1Tb pa3AeJ1SJTb soil [sil] - nOYBa species ['spi:Ji:z] - BVlAbl stability [sta'biliti] - YCTOi1YVI BOCTb, cTa6Lt111bHOCTb steal [sti:)] (stole, stolen) - nOX1t1w.aTb therefore ['oeaf:] - n03ToMY touch [tA tfj- npVlKacaTbCSJ uncertainty [An'sa:tnti] - HeYBepeHHocTb, COMHe- HLt1e untold ['An'tauld] - HepaccKa3aHHbI variety [va'raiati] - pa3J1"iHbli1 vein [vein] - BeHa weave [wi:v] (wove, woven) - nJ1eCTVI web [web] - CnJ1eTeHVle IImDD Em 
This We Believe Humans have become so numerous and our tools so powerful that we have driven fellow creatures to extinction, damned the great rivers, torn down anci- ent forests, poisoned the earth, rain and wind, and ripped holes in the sky. Our science has brought pain as well as joy; our comfort is paid for by the suffering of millions. We are learning from our mistakes, we are mourning our vanished kin, and now we build a new politics of hope. We respect and uphold the absolute need for clean air, water and soil. We see that economic activities that benefit the few while shrinking the in- heritance of many are wrong. And since environmental degradation erodes biological capital forever. full ecological and social cost must enter all equations of development. We are one brief generation in the long march of time; the future is not ours to erase. So where knowledge is limited, we will remember all those who will walk after us, and err on the side of caution. This We Resolve All this that we know and believe must now become the foundation of the way we live. At this turning point in our relationship with Earth, we work for an evolution: from dominance to partnership; from fragmentation to connection; from insecurity, to interdependence. WORDLIST ancient ['einfnt] -ApeBHVI believe [bi'li:v] - BepLt1Tb (B) benefit ['benifit] - npVlHOCVlTb n0J1b3Y brief [bri:f] - KOpOTKVli1, MVlMOJ1eTHbli1 capital ['krepitl] - Kanit1TaJ1 caution ['k:f(  )n] - OCTOpO>KHOCTb, OCMOTp- TeJ1bHOCTb connection [k'nekf( )n) - CB513b cost [k:)st) - CTOMOCTb creature ['kri:tf) - C03AaHVle damn [drem) - 3ary6V1Tb degradation [,degr'deif( )n) - BblpO)I(JJ.eHit1e development [di'velpmnt) - pa3Bit1Tit1e dominance ['d:)minns] - rocnOACTBO drive [draiv) (drove, driven) - 3A. npLt1BOAit1Tb ecological Li:k'leBikl) - SK0J10rVlyeCKLt1i1 economic activities Li:k'n:)mik rek'tivitiz) - SKOHOMVlYeCKaAeTeJ1bHOCTb enter ['ent] - 6blTb cocTaBHo yaCTblO environment [in'vairnmnt) -OKpY>KeHVle equation [i'kweif()n] -ypoBeHb erase [i'reiz) - CTit1paTb erode [i'rud] - pa3MbiBaTb err [:] - oWVl6aTbC51, 3a6J1}')KAaTbc51 evolution L i:v 'I u:f(  ) n] - pa3BLt1Te. 3B0J1IOU.it151 extinction [iks'tiI)kf( )n] - BbIMLt1paHLt1e (poAa) forever [f'rev] -HaBcerAa foundation [faun'deif()n] -OCHOBaHLt1e, OCHOBa fIE] Unit .8 fragmentation Lfrregmen'teif(  )n] - pa3pblB generation LeBen 'reif( ) n] - nOKOJ1eHVle hope[hup]-HaAea inheritance [in 'herit(  )ns] - HaCJ1eAVIe insecurity Linsi'kjuriti] - HeHaAe>KHOCTb knowledge ['nlieB] - 3HaHVle, 3HaHVlSI limit ['limit] - OrpaHVlYVlBaTb march [ma:tf]- WeCTBit1e, Mapw mourn [m:n] - OnJ1aKit1BaTb need [ni:d] - HaA06HOCTb, H}')KAa, nOTpe6HocTb numerous ['nju:mrs] - MHOrOYVlCJ1eHHbl pain [pein) - 60J1b partnership ['pa:tnsip] - napTHepCTBO poison [pizn] - OTpaBJ151Tb powerful ['paufuI] -CMbHbl, MOUJ.Hbl relationship [ri'leif(  )njip] - OTHOWeHit1e resolve [ri'zlv] - pewaTb respect [ris'pekt] - YBIDKaTb, nOYVlTaTb rip holes [rip huI}- npOAeJ1blBaTb Ablpbl shrink ['friI)k] (shrank, shrunk) - cOKpaTb social ['suf( )1] - cou.VlaJ1bHbl suffering ['sAfriI)] - CTpClAaHit1e tear [ti] (tore, torn) - 3A. YHVlYTO>KaTb tool [tu:l] - 0PYAVle turning point - nOBopoTHblt1 nYHKT uphold [Ap'huld] (upheld, upheld) - nOMep>KVlBaTb, OKa3blBaTb nOAQep>KKY vanished ['vre n ift] - it1Cye3alOUJ.Vli1 
DEVELOPMENTS 28. npO'fMTaHTe M nepeCKa)l(MTe TeKCTbl. John Muir: American naturalist John Muir was an inventor. conservationist, explorer. naturalist, and teac- her. He dedicated his life to preserving nature. Born in Scotland on April 21. 1838. John was one of eight children. He star- ted school when he was three years old. The Scottish countryside was the perfect playground for John. He watched birds, explored meadows and fields, and climbed the ruins of a nearby castle. His early love for hiking, climbing, and nature followed him throughout his life. In 1849 John's father decided to move to America. He took John and his two younger children with him. The rest of the family arrived from Scotland nine months later. The Muirs settled in Wisconsin. Pioneer work was very hard for young John. Land had to be cleared, and logs had to be cut and split to make fences. Fields had to be plowed, planted, and harvested. John continued to work on the family farm until he was 22 years old. He then packed his bags, moved to Madison and entered the University of Wis- consin. At the university, John studied chemistry, biology, and geology. In the spring of 1864. John set out for Canada. He began a lifelong journey to explo- re and eventually protect parts of the North American wilderness. On his first journey to California, John was amazed by the beauty he saw. The clear rivers, towering waterfalls, and great variety of plants and wildlife convinced him that California would be his home. While working for a shep- herd, John realized that sheep's hoofed feet damaged the delicate plant life. From these experiences grew John's love of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. When he saw sheep destroy the wilderness. he became more dedicated to finding a way to save it. He became a famous writer on the Sierras. Through his writings and continuous work, Yosemite Valley was soon protected by the state of California. He found so much destruction of the environment that he set out to save it His efforts helped make Yosemite a national park in 1890. By 1892, he formed WORDLIST California Lkreli'f3:nj] - KaJlVlcpOpHLt151 castle ['ka:sl] - aaMOK climb [klaim] - nOAHVlMaTbC51 concentrate ['k3 nse n tre it] - cocpeAoT04V1BaTb conservationist Lkns(: )'veiJnist] - AVipeKTOp 3anOBeAHLt1Ka convince [kn'vins] -y6e)l(AaTb countryside ['kAntrisaid] -CellbCKa51 MeCTHOCTb damage ['dremict3] - HaHOCTb BpeA dedicate ['dedikeit] - nOCBS1LWlTb destroy [dis'tri] - pa3pywaTb destruction [dis'trAkJ()n] - pa3pyweHe, YH4- TO>KeHe eventually [i'ventjuIi] - B KOHu.e KOHU.OB experience [iks'pirins] -onblT explorer [iks'pI:r] - CCJ1eAOBaTellb fence [fens] -orpaAa, aarpIDKAeHVle form [f:m] - 06pa30BbiBaTb harvest ['ha:vist] - YPo>Kai1 hiking ('haikilJ] - AJlLt1TeJ1bHaS1 nporyJ1Ka, nOXOA hoof [hu:f] - KonblTO inventor [in'vent] - Vl306peTaTeJ1b log [Ig] - 6peBHo meadow ['medu] -J1yr nearby ['nibai] - 61lVl3KVli1, coceAHVI playground ['pleigraund] - cnopTVlBHa51 nJ10lJ..l.aAKa plow [pIau] - naxaTb preserve [pri'z:v] - coxpaH51Tb ruins ['ruins] - PYHbI set out [set aut] -OTnpaBJ1S1TbCS1 B nYTeweCTBe settle [setl] - nOCeJ1L-1TbCS1 shepherd [:repd] - nacTyx split [split] - pa3py6V1Tb the rest [o rest] - OCTaJlbHbie throughout [Sru:'aut] - 4epe3 towering ['tauriI)] - BblCOKVI, B3AbIMalOlJ..I.CS1 valley ['vreli] - AOllVlHa variety [v'raiti] - pa3Ho06pa3e waterfall ['w:tf:l] - BOAOnaA wilderness ['wildnis] - AVlKaS1 MeCTHOCTb I!lmD Em 
and became the first president of the Sierra Club. He was a respected consul- tant on conservation matters from then until his death. When John Muir died in 1914, he left behind a new way of looking at America's wilderness. Instead of seeing it as something to be conquered, he taught us that we must learn to preserve and enjoy the wilderness. John said it best when he encouraged people to "Climb the mountains. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshin flows Jnto trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, while cares wili drop off like autumn leaves." Answer the questions, please: 1 ) John Muir lived most of his life in America. But in what country was he 'born? 2) How old was John when he moved to America? .. 3) What did John do until he was 22 years old? How did this affect his interest in nature? 4) At what age did John begin his travels across North America? 5) In what state did John finally settle? Why did he settle there? 6) What quality in John do you like the most? 7) If he were alive today, what do you think John would say about the environ- ment? .... 0' - 0 29. npeAcTaBbTe, 'ITO Bbl BblcTynaeTe Ha KOH4>epeHL\MM no npo- 6neMaM 3KonorMM. 3Ta TeMa Ao6aDMT DaM MAeM no 3TOM np06neMe. Do you love nature? Ecology is a science about nature and about the relations of man with it. Practically, it is a science studying whether we, human beings keep our com- mon house, our Planet Earth, in a good state and how we use the gifts it is giving us: water, air, land, minerals, plants, animals etc. I am Irina Sutokskaya, an ecologist. I've been working in environmental protection for 20 years now. When I was a little girl I felt already that nature was the place where I was feeling most natural. From that time my favourite season has been autumn when I could stroll in the woods enjoying the autumn trees, gold and purple, gathering mushrooms and thanking Mother Nature for each of them. Later, when was studying biology, doing research in ecology and reading books on physics, I understood the physical basis and the energy of those feelings. We are really one with nature, our planet and the Universe being connected with them by every cell of our being. The feeling of being one with the world is WORDLIST a consultant [kn'sAltnt] on conservation matters- KOHCYJ1b TaHT no BonpocaM coxpaHeHVI (oKp}')KalOw.e cpeAbl) basis ['beisis] - OCHOBa care [k£] - 3a60Ta common ['k3m  n] - 06w.VI connect [k'nekt] -coeAHTb conquer ['k3IJ k] - aaBoeBblBaTb encourage [in'kAricB] - noow.pTb environmental protection [in'vair( ) nmntl pr'tekf(  )n] - 3aw.Ta OKp}')KalOw.ei1 cpeAbi favourite ['feivrit] - J1106Mbli1 feel [fi:l] (felt, felt) - YBcTBoBaTb m!] I!mID freshness ['fref n is] - CBe)f(eCTb gather ['greo] - c06V1paTb gift [gift] -Aap human beings ['hju:mn 'bi:iQz] - J1IOA mushroom ['mAfrum] - rpVl6 natural ['nrerl] -3A. eCTeCTBeHHO nature ['nei] - nppoAa plant [pla:nt] - pacTeHe purple ['p:pl] - nypnYPHbl research [ri's:if] - CCJ1eAOBaHe science ['sains] - HaYKa stroll [strul] - nporyJ1BaTbC Universe ['ju:nivs] - BceJ1eHHa 
ftt  . -  ,.f . :\. 'L -:; 6 ,. ::'.1" ,  - - -.: ." , · 4 . ,. " . .: 1; ...  ... ... t \ '\ ,.' . '. \ . . '" .# .11_ ..  -;\..L...- :, c -- -. ... -  --- '., . " ... '  ". .  1L'" .:  ...- ... " ?, I. ..;:-J' ."':-.. 0'(, .' '..C""l!:- ;.- .t# '(": fJi....;::,. . . .....,.. -'" ... . .,' . _,._II>,, '....f1ai"",. .. - ,,' ..-, . -. ·  . . . -::.".r:'' f." - ...I' _ _ ' , .;- , ., . .." y. y.- ),. . .. - ..  -..- .... - -».... .." '. +' . .. - .,' ";.., , WORDLIST ancestor ['rensist] - npeAoK ancient reinfnt] -ApeBHVli1 as follows [z 'fluz] - cJ1eAYIOVlM 06pa30M balance ['brelns] - paBHOBeCVle birch [b:tJ] - 6epe3a cell [sel] - KlleTKa challenge [,1frelinct] - 3a.o.aa civilization [.sivilai'zeif(  )n] - U.VlBi-1J1Lt13au.VI clearing [kliril)] - npOCBer cover rkA v ] - nOKpblBaJlO create [kri:'eit] - coaAaBaTb deer [di ] - OJ1eHb destroy [dis'tri] - paapywaTb eagle [i:gl] - opeJ1 experience [iks'pirins] - onblT express [ik'spres] - BblpIDKaTb foliage ['fulii<t] - J1V1CTBa generation LQ)en'reif(  )n] - nOKOJ1eHVle holy rh uli] - cBsnoi1 hum [hAm] ->K,)I()KaTb image ['imi<t] - 06pa3 insect ['insekt] - HaceKOMoe '!' very ancient. It is expressed in many old bo- oks and myths of different countries. For in- stance, Chief Seattle in his famous speech at a tribal meeting in 1854 expressed the feeling of North American Indians as follows: UEvery part of this earth is sacred to my people. Eve- ry shining pine needle. every sandy shore. every mist in the dark woods, every clearing and every humming insect is holy in the me- mory and experience of my people... We are part of the earth and it is part of us. The perfumed flowers are our sisters; the deer. horse. the great eagle - these are our brothers" . The same wonderful feeling of being one with nature was always typical also for Rus- sian people in old times. Every Russian vil- lage family had the images of nature eve- rywhere in the house - the flowers on the cups, bed covers and clothes, the leaves on the towels as if reflecting that time when our ancestors were wiping their faces and hands after washing with green foliage of birch tree. Unfortunately. later our technical civilizati- on thinking only of material goods succeeded in destroying Nature and creating the ecolo- gical crisis on our planet. And it is your chal- lenge, young people, to restore an ecological balance on our planet and to leave it clean and healthy for future generations. ... .., leaves [l i:vz] - J1V1CTb memory ['memri] - naMTb mist [mist] -TYMaH myth [mi8] - M1-1cp needle ['ni:dl] - VlrJ1a part [pa: t] - yaCTb perfume [p'fju:m] -apOMaT pine [pain] - COCHa reflect [ri'flekt] - oTpIDKaTb restore [ri'st:] - BOCCTaHaBJ1V1BaTb sacred ['seikrid] - CBTOi1 sandy ['srendi] - necaHbli1 shore U:] - 6eper speech [spi:tJ] - peb succeed [sk'si:d] - cYMeTb the same [o seim] - TOT >Ke caMbli1 towel ['taul] - n0J10TeHu.e tribal meeting [traibl] - C06paHLt1e nJ1eMeHVI village ['vilict] - AepeBH wipe [wai p] - BblTVlpaTb wonderful rw Andful] - npeKpacHbli1 I!mID fm 
30. npOliMTaMTe M nepeBeAMTe nMCbMeHHO nepBble BoceMb CTpO- '1eK. npoBepbTe ce6S1.no KII10'lY. BbIY'IMTe MX M cAenaMTe nMCb- MeHHO o6paTHbiM nepeBOA. npoMrpaMTe 3TOT paCCKa3 B nMax. The Nightingale and the Rose After Oscar Wilde "She said that she would dance with me if I brought her red roses," cried the young Student, "but in all my garden there is no red rose." From her nest in the oak tree the Nightingale heard him, and she looked out through the leaves and wondered. "No red rose in all my garden!" he cried, and his beautiful eyes filled with tears. "Ah, on what little things does happiness depend! I have read all that the wise men have written, and all the secrets of philosophy are mine, yet for want of a red rose is my life made wretched." "Here at last is a true lover," said the Nightingale. "Night after night have I sung of him, though I knew him not: night after night have I told his story to the stars and now I see him. His hair is dark as the hyacinth-blossom, and his lips are red as the rose of his desire; but passion has made his face like pale ivory, and sorrow has set her seal upon his brow." "The Prince gives a ball tomorrow night," murmured the young student, "and my love will be of the company. If I bring her a red rose she will dance with me till dawn. If I bring her a red rose, I shall hold her in my arms, and she will lean her head upon my shoulder, and her hand will be clasped in mine. But there is no red rose in my garden, so I shall sit lonely, and she will pass me by, and my heart will break." "Here, indeed, is the true lover," said the Nightingale. "What I sing of, he suffers; what is joy to me, to him is pain. Surely love is a won- derful thing. It is more precious than emeralds and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and pomeg-   , , .J . .. . '"  J 1 f-'.- :.;l /,. . II  ,.II> . ".. '- :-  -  "\ (\ '" ') L\'t-'  \ :"' L U1  P' 'I')  .....- "' S\ "-.. ,'- --  - WORDLIST .. .and sorrow has set her seal upon his brow - VI CKop6b HaIlO)f("1J1a neyaTb Ha ero yeJ10 Ah, on what little things does happiness depend!- Ax, OT KaKL-1X nycTKoB 3aBL-1CL-1T nopolO CyaCTbe! ball [b::>:I] - 6aJ1 clasp [kIn: sp ] - C)f(Lt1MaTb dawn [d:n] - paCCBeT desire [di'zaig] - )f(ellaTb emerald ['emar(a)Id] - 3YMPYA hyacinth-blossom ['haiasin8 Iblsam] - u.BeTYLt1L1 rVlau.VlHT I shall hold her in my arms.- s:l6YAY Aep)f(aTb ee B CBOVIX 06bSUVlSJX. it is more precious ['prefas] - OHa Aparou.eHHee ivory ['aiv( a )ri] - CJ10HOBaSJ KOCTb lean one's head [li:n] - CKJ10HL-1Tb rOJlOBY lip - ry6a fm I!lmD lover [IIA va] - BIl106J1eHHbl murmur ['ma:ma] - 60pMoTaTb my love will be of the company - MOSJ 1l106MaSJ 6YAeTCpeAL-1rOCTe nest [n est] - rHe3AO nightingale ['naitilJgeil] - C0J10Be oak ['auk] - Ay6 opal ['aup( a)1] - onaJ1 pass by [pa:s bail - npOT"1 MViMO passion ['pref( g)n] - cTpacTb pearl [pa:l] -)f(eMyyr philosophy [fi 11 safi] - ct>VlJ10COct>SJ What I sing of, he suffers. - To, YTO 51 BocneBalO, AJlSJ Hero CTp8AClHVle. wise [waizJ - MYAPblt1 wonder ['wAnda] -YALt1BJ1SJTbCSJ wretched ['re1fid] - HeCyaCTHbli1 
ranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the market-place. It may not be pur- chased of the merchants, nor can it be weighed out in the balance for gold." "The musicians will sit in their gallery," said the young Student, "and play upon their stringed instruments, and my love will dance to the sound of the harp and the violin. She will dance so ligt=\tly that her feet will not touch the floor, and the courtiers in their gay dresses will throng round her. But with me she will not dance, for I have no red rose to give her;" and he flung himself down on the grass, and buried his face in his hands, and wept. "Why is he weeping?" asked a little Green Lizard, as he ran past him with his tail in the air. "Why, indeed?" said a Butterfly, who was fluttering about after a sunbeam. "Why, indeed?" whispered a Daisy to his neighbour in a soft, low voice. "He is weeping for a red rose," said the Nightingale. "For a red rose?" they cried; "how very ridiculous!" and the little Lizard, who was something of a cynic, laughed outright. But the Nightingale understood the secret of the Student's sorrow, and she sat silent in the oak-tree, and thought about the mystery of Love. Suddenly she spread .her brown wings for flight, and soared into the air. She passed through the grove like a shadow and like a shadow she sailed across the garden. In the centre of the grass-plot was standing a beautiful rose-tree, and when she saw it she flew over to it, and lit upon a spray. "Give me a red rose ," she cried, "and I will sing you my sweetest song." But the Tree shook its head. "My roses are white," it answered; "as white as the foam of the sea, and whiter than the snow upon the mountain. But go to my brother who grows ro- und the old sun-dial, and perhaps he will give you what you want." So the Nightingale flew over to the Rose-tree that was growing round the old sun-dial. "Give me a red rose," she cried. "and I will sing you my sweetest song." But the Tree shook its head. "My roses are yellow," it answered; "as yellow as the hair of the merma- iden who sits upon an amber throne, and yellower than the daffodil that blo- oms in the meadow before the mower comes with his scythe. But go to my WORDLIST amber ['rembd] - SlHTapb bloom [blu:m] - u.BeCT butterfly ['bAtdflai] - 6a60'-lKa courtier ['k:tjd] - npABopHbl cynic ['sinik] - U.HK daffodil ['drefddiI] - Hapu.VlCC daisy ['deizi] - MaprapVlTKa fling [fl ilJ] (flung) oneself down - ynacTb H'-IKOM flutter ['flAtd] - 3A. nopxaTb foam [fdum] - neHa gallery ['greldri] - XOpbl gay [gei] - HapSlAHblVi grass-plot ['gra:s 'plt] -llY>Kai1Ka, raaOH grove [grduv] - poa, J1eCOK harp [ha:p] -apcpa laugh outright [Ia:f 'autrait] - OTKpblTO CMeSlTbCSI lightly [laitli] - llerKO lizard ['I iZdd] - SlLl.tepu.a merchant ['md:U'dnt] - ToproBe mermaiden ['md:meiddn] - cVlpeHa mystery of love ['mistdri dV ItA v] - TaHCTBO J1106BL-1 nor is it set forth in the market-place - 3A. He npOAaeTCSI OHa (J11060Bb)  Ha pblHKe pomegranate ['pmi,grrenit] - rpaHaT purchase ['Pd:U'dS] - nOKYnaTb ridiculous [ri'dikjulds] - cMewHoi1 soar [s:] - nOAHVlMaTbCSI BBblCb spray [sprei] - BeTO'-lKa stringed instrument ['striQd 'instrumdnt] - CTPYHHbli1 HCTpYMeHT sun-dial ['sAndaidl] - COJ1He'-lHble '-IaCbl sunbeam ['sAnbi:m] - COJ1He'-lHbli1 J1Y'-l throne [Srdun] -TPOH, npeCTOJl throng [SrlJ] - TOJ1nTbCSI violin [tvaid'lin] - CKpnKa weep [wi:p] (wept, wept) - nJ1aKaTb weigh out in the balance - BblMeHBaTb whisper ['WiSpd] - wenTaTb I!mD mJ 
brother who grows beneath the Student's window, and perhaps he will give you what you want." So the Nightingale flew over to the Rose-tree that was growing beneath the Student's window. "Give me a red rose," she cried, "and I will sing you my sweetest song." But the Tree shook its head. "My roses are red," it answered, "as red as the feet of the dove, and redder than the great fans of coral that wave and wave in the ocean-cavern. But the winter has chilled my veins. and the frost has nipped my buds, and the storm has broken my branches, and I shall have no roses at all this year." "One red rose is all I want," cried the Nightingale, "only one red rose! Is _ there no way by which I can get it?" "There is a way," answered the Tree; "but it is so terrible that I dare not tell it to you." "Tell it to me," said the Nightingale, "I am not afraid." "If you want a red rose," said the Tree, "you must build it out of music by moonlight, and stain it with your own heart's-blood. You must sing to me with your breast against a thorn. All night long you must sing to me, and the thorn must pierce your heart, and your life-blood must flow into my veins, and beco- me mine." "Death is a great price to pay for a red rose," cried the Nightingale, "and Life is very dar to all. It is pleasant to sit in the green wood, and to watch the Sun in his chariot of gold} and the Moon in her chariot of pearl. Sweet is the scent of the hawthorn, and sweet are the bluebells that hide in the valley, and the heather that blows on the hill. Yet Love is better than Life, and what is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man?" So she spread her brown wings for flight, and soared into the air. She swept over the garden like a shadow, and like a shadow she sailed through the grove. The young Student was still lying on the grass, where she had left him, and the tears were not yet dry in his beautiful eyes. "Be happy," cried the Nightingale, "be happy; you shall have your red rose. I will build it out of music by moonlight, and stain it with my own heart's-blo- ad. All that I ask of you in return is that you will be a true lover, for Love is wiser than Philosophy, though he is wise, and mightier than Power, though he is mighty. Flame-coloured are his wings, and coloured like flame is his body. His lips are sweet as honey, and his breath is like frankincense." The Student looked up from the grass, and listened, but he could not un- derstand what the Nightingale was saying to him, for he only knew the things that are written down in books. WORDLIST bluebell ['blu:bel] - K0J10K0J1bYK bud [bAd] - nOYKa cavern ['krevn] - neLltepa chariot ['tfrerit] - KOJ1eCHVlu.a chill [tfil] - CTYAVlTb coral ['kr(  )1] - KOpaJ1J1 dove [dAv]-rony6b fan [fren] - Beep flame [fleim] - nJ1aMs:I frankincense ['frreIJki n.se ns] - naAaH hawthorn ['h:e:n] - 60s:lPbIWHK honey [lhA n i] - MeA I dare not tell it to you.- Y MeHs:I He XBaTaeT AYXY OTKpblTb ero Te6e. mower ['mu] - Koceu. nip [nip] (nipped, nipped) - n06V1Tb MOp030M pierce [pis] - npOH3aTb scent [se n t] - 3anax scythe [said] - Koca stain [stein] -3A. oKponTb thorn [e:n] - wn valley ['vreli] - AOJ1Ha vein [vein] -)f(VlJ1a 9 Em Im!D 
But the Oak-tree understood, and felt sad, for he was very fond of the little Nightingale who had built her nest in his branches. "Sing me one last song/' he whispered; "I shall feel lonely when you are gone. " So the Nightingale sang to the Oak-tree, and her voice was like water bub- bling from a silver jar. When she had finished her song, the Student got up, and pulled a note- book and a lead-pencil out of his pocket. "She has form," he said to himself, as he walked away through the grove- "that cannot be denied to her; but has she got feeling? I am afraid not. In fact, she is like most artists; she is all style without any sincerity. She would not sacrifice herself for others. She thinks merely of music, and everybody knows that the arts are selfish. Still, it must be admitted that she has some beautiful notes in her voice. What a pity it is that they do not mean anything, or do any practical good!" And he went into his room, and lay down on his little pallet- ped, and began to think of his love; and, after a time, he fell asleep. And when the moon shone in the heavens the Nightingale flew to the Rose- tree, and set her breast against the thorn. All night long she sang, with her breast against the thorn, and the cold crystal Moon leaned down and listened. All night long she sang, and the thorn went deeper and deeper into her breast, and her life-blood ebbed away from her. She sang first of the birth of love in the heart of a boy and a girl. And on the topmost spray of the Rose-tree there blossomed a marvelous rose, petal fol- lowing petal, as song followed song. Pale was it, at first, as the mist that hangs over the river - pale as the feet of the morning, and silver as the wings of the dawn. As the shadow of a rose in a mirror of silver, as the shadow of a rose in a water-pool, so was the rose that blossomed on the topmost spray of the Tree. But the Tree cried to the Nightingale to press closer against the thorn. "Press closer, little Nightingale," cried the Tree, "or the Day will come before the rose is finished." So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and louder and lou- der grew her song, for she sang of the birth of passion in the soul of a man and a maid. And a delicate flush of pink came into the leaves of the rose, like the flush in the face of the bridegroom when he kisses the lips of the bride. But the thorn had not yet reached her heart, so the rose's heart remained white, for only a Nightingale's heart's-blood can crimson the heart of a rose. And the Tree cried to the Nightingale to press closer against the thorn. "Press closer, little Nightingale," cried the Tree, "or the Day will come before the rose is finished." So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn and the thorn, touched WORDLIST admit [gd'mit} -AonYCKaTb bride [braid] - HeBeCTa bridegroom ['braidgrum] ->KeHLt1X bubble [bAb]] - KLt1neTb, nY3blpVlTbCst crimson [krimzn] -TeMHo-KpacHbli1 crystal ['kristl] - np03pallHbtti delicate flush ['de] ikit flAf] - He}l(Hbl OTTeHOK deny [di'nai] -oTpVlu.aTb ebb [eb]-3A.noKVlAaTb jar [cBa:] - KYBWLt1H lead-pencil ['led 'pensl}- rpa<t>iI1ToBbli1 KapaHAaw marvellous ['ma:vls] - t.13YMVlTef1bHbl£1, YAVlBVlTef1b- Hbl£1 pallet-bed ['prelit bed}- Y3Kast nOCTeJlb petal [petl] - J1eneCTOK pink [pil)k] - P030Bbti1 sacrifice ['srekri fais] - >KepTBOBaTb selfish ['selfif) - SrOLt1CTLi1l1Hbli1 sincerity [sin'seriti} - t.1CKpeHHOCTb topmost ['tp m ust] - caMblii BepXH&t1£1 8 KH....ra AJ1 4Teli.... K Y4e6HHKY «C4aCTJ1. aHrJ1.-2» II!mID fm 
her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot thro- ugh her. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and vJilder grew her song, for she sang of the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb. And the marvelous rose became crimson, like the rose of the eastern sky. Crimson was the girdle of petals, and crimson as a ruby was the heart. But the Nightingale's voice grew fainter. and her little wings began to beat, and a film came over her eyes. Fainter and fainter grew her song, and she felt something choking her in her throat. Then she gave one last burst of music. The white Moon heard it, and she forgot the dawn, and lingered on in the sky. The red rose heard it, and it trembled all over with ecstasy, and opened its petals to the cold morning air. Echo bore it to her pur- ple cavern in the hills, and woke the sleeping shepherds from their dreams. It floated through the reeds of the river, and they carried its message to the sea. "Look, look!" cried the Tree, "the rose is finished now;" but the Nightingale made no answer, for she was lying dead in the long grass, with the thorn in her heart. And at noon the Student opened his window and looked out. "Why, what a wonderful piece of luck!" he cried; "here is a red rose! I have never seen any rose like it in all my life. It is so beautiful that I am sure it has a long Latin name;" and he leaned down and plucked it. Then he put on his hat, and ran up to the Professor's house with the rose in his hand. The daughter of the Professor was sitting in the doorway winding blue silk on a reel, and her little dog was lying at her feet. "You said that you would dance with me if I brought you a red rose," cried the Student. "Here is the reddest rose in all the world. You will wear it tonight next to your heart, and as we dance together it will tell you how I love you." But the girl frowned. "I am afraid it will not go with my dress," she answered; "and, besides, the Chamberlain's nephew has sent me some real je\Nels, and everybody knows that jewels cost far more than flowers." "Well, upon my word, you are very ungrateful," said the Student angrily; and he threw the rose into the street, where it fell into the gutter, and a car- twheel went over it. wr c 1 . Jr l   .  _ jf.Q\. -t \ t '\ \ ,,'  \ t f, - .. . I ! . WORDLIST a film came over her eyes - rna3a ee 3aryMaH- nLt1Cb choke [tf  uk] - 3a.c\blxaTbCSJ ecstasy ['ekstdsi] -3KCTa3. BOCTopr fierce [fids] - CII1J1bHbli1 float [fldut] - npoHocVlTbCSJ frown [fraun] - HaXMYPIl1TbCSJ girdle [gd:dl] - SeHljlt1K I am afraid it will not go with my dress.- 601OCb. OHa (p03a) He nOAoi1AeT K MoeMY nJ1aTblO. em I!mID ,..' J 10. Latin ['lretin] - naTLt1HCKII1i1 linger [IIi I)gd] - 3(lAep)f(VlSaTbcSJ pang [prel)] - BHe3anHaSJ oCTpaSJ 60J1b pluck [pIAk] - cpblBaTb reed [ri:d] - KaMblW reel [ri:l] - KarywKa ruby ['ru:bi] - py6V1H shepherd [If epdd] - nacl)'X 
"Ungrateful!" said the girl. "I tell you what, you are very rude; and, after all, who are you? Only a Student. Why, I don't believe you have even got silver buckles to your shoes as the Chamberlain's nephew has;" and she got up from her chair and went into the house. "What a silly thing Love is!" said the Student as he walked away. "It is not half as useful as Logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true. In fact, it is quite unpractical, and, as in this age to be practical is everything, I shall go back to Philosophy and study Metaphysics." So he returned to his room and pulled out a great dusty book, and began to read. KEY conOBEM M P03A OCKap YaMflb,D, - OHa CKa3alla, '-ITO nOTaHLJ.yeT co MHOJ eCllll1 51 nplt1Hecy e KpaCHblX P03.- BOCKllIt1KHYll MOllOAO CTYAeHT,- HO B MoeM CaAY HeT HII1 OAHO KpaCHO p03bl. Ero YCllblWaJl COllOBe B CBoeM rHe3Ae Ha Ay6eJ 111, YAIt1BlleHHbl, Bblr1l5lHYll 1113 11Il1CTBbl. - HIt1 eAHO KpaCHo£1 p03bl BO BceM MoeM caAY! - npOAOll)1(all ceTOBaTb CTY- AeHT, It1 ero npeKpaCHble rlla3a HanOllHIt111It1Cb Clle3aMIt1.- Ax, OT KaKIt1X nycTKoB 3aBL-1CT nopotO c4acTbe!  npOyell Bce, '-ITO Hanlt1Calllt1 MYAPble JltOAIt1,  nOCTr Bce TaHbl CPIt1JlOCOCPIt1,- a )l(1t13Hb M051 pa361t1Ta 1t13-3a Toro TOllbKO, YTO Y MeH HeT KpaCHO p03bl. WORDLIST buckle [bAk 1] - npS1>KKa cartwheel rka:twi:l] - Koneco TenerVi chamberlain ['tfeimb;}lin] -- KaMeprep gutter ['gAt] - KoneS1 jewel ['cBu:l] -Aparou.eHHbl KaMeHb logic ['Ict3ik] - norViKa Metaphysics Lmet'phiziks] - MeTa<t>Lt13i11Ka EBlfm 
Aopore APY3b! Mbl XOTLt1M, To6bl Bbl npOLt1TaJlLt1 0 )f(Lt13HLt1 Lt1 TBOpeCTBe HeKOTOpblX BblAatO- LlJ.Lt1XCfI JlKJAeC1, KOTOpble CBOLt1M reHLt1eM Lt1 ynopHblM TPYAOM npOCJlaBLt1J1J/1 CBoe OTe- eCTBO Lt1 060raTLt1JlLt1 Bce MLt1pOBOe coo6- w.eCTBO. A ew.e Mbl XOTlI1M, lIT06bl Bbl nosepLt1J1Lt1 B TO, LITO TaJ1aHTJ1V1BbIM p0)KAaeTCfI Ka)f{- Abl eJlOBeK, rnaBHoe OTKpblTb B ce6e CBO TaJlaHT, pa3BLt1Tb ero. )l(enaeM ycnexa! 
Knowledge is a city, to the building of which every human being brought a stone. Emerson, P. Ralph Waldo (1803-1882) Famous Englishmen 1. Listen, read and find out. London has been the home of many famous Englishmen. Some were born there. Some lived there all their lives. Others lived in London only for a short time but all gave something to this great city. One of the first names of importance is that of Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet. He lived most of his life in London. He knew the courts of King Richard II and King Henry IV. His most famous work, is "The Canterbury Tales. n Chaucer held official posts in London and is buried in Westminster Abbey. William Shakespeare also lived in London. He lived there for more than twenty years. He acted at the Globe Theatre and wrote his plays in London. But London"s famous men are not only writers. Sir Christopher Wren, the archi- tct, speot most of his life in London. He designed many beautiful churches, including St. Paul's Cathedral. He also designed palaces and fine houses. Music is represented by a very interesting figure. This is George Frederick' Handel. He came to London from Hanover in 1710. He lived for a time at Bur- lington House, Piccadilly, now the Royal Academy. After some success and some failure he at last became famous. This happened when he composed "The Messiah, II and "The Music for the Royal Fireworks. n Like Chaucer and many other great artists, Handel is buried in Westminster Abbey. Another famous London figure is one of England's greatest seamen, Admi- ral Lord Nelson. He has a very special memorialrn Trafalgar Square. The mon- ument consists of a very tall column. On top of it stands a figure of Nelson. It is called Nelson's Column. Equally famous is the general who led the army at the battle of Waterloo in 1815. This was the Duke of Wellington. His house stands at Hyde Park Corner. It is sometimes known as Number One, London. Like Admiral Nelson, the Duke of Wellington is buried in St. Paul's Cathedral. WORDLIST Admiral Lord Nelson ['nelsn] - aAU1paJl llOPA HellbcoH Burlington rbg:lit)tn] - 6epniHrToH Christopher Wren ['kristfJ 'ren] - KpVlcTocpep PeH - aHrllL-1CKVli1 apXL-1TeKTOp-KllaCCVlLJ.VlCT design J di'zain] - npOeKTL-1pOBaTb failure rfei1j] - HeYAaya, npOBan Geoffrey Chaucer [,ctefri lij J:Sg] - A>t<eCPPt1 LJocep - aHnlVlcKVI n03T, OCHOBOnOnO)l(HVIK aHrll1i1cKoro llViTeparYPHoro 3blKa George Frederick Handel rcB:ct 'fredrik 'hrendl] - reopr CPpAPVlX reHAellb (1685-1759)- KOMn03V1TOp VI opraHVlcT Hanover ['hrendv] -raHHoBep (ropoA B repMaHiI1i-1) King Henry IV ['henri] (Bolingbroke rblit)bruk]) - aHrnVli1cKt1£1 KOpOllb reHpVlIV (1367-1413), Ha npecTone C 1399 r. lead [li:d] (led, led) - PYKOBOAt1Tb, B03rnaBflTb Piccadilly r.pik'dili 1- n1t1KClAL-1nVl (nnOll.laAb B nOHAOHe) represent [.repri'zent 1- npeACTaBnTb Richard II ['riU"Jd] - PVlyapA II (1367-1400)- aHrnVlCK1t1 KOpOllb, npaBVIll B 1377-1399 rr. seaman ['si:mJn] - MOpK, MaTpoc liThe Canterbury Tales" ['krentJb:>ri] - "KeHTep6e- pVlCKiI1e paccKa3bl" (1387-1400) the Duke of Wellington ['dju:k v 'Welil)tn]- repllor BennVlHrToH (1769--1852) - aHrnVli1cK1t1 cpenbAMapwan Lt1 rocYAapcTBeHHbli1 AeTellb. B 1815 r. pa36i-111 apM1t1tO HanoneoHa npVl BaTeplloo. the Globe Theatre ['glJub 'eit;)] -TeaTp "rJlo6yc" "The Messiah" [mi'sai J - opaTopVlS1"MeccVI" (1741) liThe Music for the Royal Fireworks" [faiw:ks] - "MY3bIKa AJlS1 cpei1epBepKa" Waterloo Lw:t'lu:] - BaTepnoo (ropoA B 6enbrVl1t1) William Shakespeare [\viljJm 'Jeik,spi] - Yi-1J1b5lM WeKCn1t1p (1564-1616) - aHrn1t1CKi-1£1 n03T t1 ApaMarypr Westminster Abbey ['westminstd 'rebi] - BecT- M1t1HCTepCKoe a66aTcTBo Unit 9 Em 
Composers For whom did Vivaldi compose his music? Antonio Vivaldi, the Italian composer who lived from 1678 to 1741, composed most of his music for the pupils of a girls' or- phanage in Venice. His job was to teach the violin, but because the choir and or- chestra there were so good, he composed music for them. His most famous work includes the Four Seasons concertos- but he wrote hundreds of other pieces. Questions: 1) How did Antonio Vivaldi start to compose music? 2) What Vivaldi pieces do you know? 3) What Italian composers do you know? 4) What city is Vivaldi's life connected with? 2. Explain, please: "He composed music". ......r::5, ,;.. - I. \\\\\ I l ")..,:.,...-.,. r' \ J'.,  "y !  it ' - .\' "",J 't.  ' " . h\ -, .' " ,X\.. \  \, 'f.j.).\ \  . ,,) '-' t. . ., .J.. "",t " \ ' r ;. ,/, '"" \ -  ' ........... , "". ' 3. BblnMwMTe rnaronbl B Past Simple M KpaTKO nepeCKa>KMTe TeKCT Hcnonb3YSl 3TH rnaronbl. . AMCKYCCMR 1) A. Vivaldi liked children, didn't he? 2) Do you know anything about Italy? (Find the answer in the text, please.) 3) How can you show that he was fond of nature? 4) Was his job to teach the violin or to compose music? .  ('.  ,- . .....,. . ,. ,< _.. ............ ... . " ..1 Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) Joseph Haydn is a great Austrian composer He was born in a village not far from Vienna. He composed more than 80 string quartets, 100 symphonies, 52 sonatas, about 30 operas. Sympho- nies, quartets and sonatas are considered to be his best musical compositions. He was called "Papa" of symphonies and quartets, because he made them classical. He lived a long life and knew Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, who highly appreciated his talent. Haydn's contemporaries adored his music. Questions: 1) Joseph Haydn is a great Austrian composer, isn't he? 2) Why are symphonies and quartets considered to be his best musical compositions? 3) What films about foreign and Russian composers have you seen and what is your opinion of them? WORDLIST A. Vivaldi [vi'va:Jdi] - A. BVisanbAi1, VlTanbHcKVli1 CKpVlnall VI KOMn03V1TOp (1678-1741 ) choir ['kwaid] - xop concerto [kdn'tfcndu] - KOHl\epT famous ['feimds] - Vl3BecTHbl, 3HaMeHVlTbl fB] Unit.g orchestra ['3:kistrJ] - opKecrp orphanage ['J:fdnicB] - npVlIOT AJl CVlpOT piece [pi:s] -3A. MY3blKanbHoe npoVl3BeAeHVle Venice ['vcnis]- BeHelI1 violin (.vaid'lin] - CKpVlnKa 
Who was Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven has been called the greatest com- poser who has ever lived - yet he was deaf for much of his life. Beethoven lived from 1770 to 1827 He was born in Bonn in Germany. At the age of 17 he went to Vienna to study under Mozart. The teacher and the student soon became friends. Later, he studied with Joseph Haydn, but we know he was not satisfied and took extra lessons in secret! By the age of 32, he knew he was going deaf. Deeply de- pressed, he had to give up playing, but was able to go on com- posing because he could still hear the sound of the music in his head. He used to go for long walks, carrying a sketch book in which he wrote down his musical ideas. We remember him for many great works - including masterpieces such as the Moonlight Sonata and his famous Ninth Symphony, in which he intro- duced choral music for the first time in a symphony. . '"'t, :>- , '.,. . .&:. . <\ t ..- it..... rt ... .  "\\ \" - .j!." " I ....-. I .. . . ...... \. "" '.A   \. ..J\- -,\{ "t   '"'l -"- " , , :(  < ; Questions: 1) What other German composers do you know? 2) What Beethoven masterpiece do you know? 3) Who was his teacher? 4) What happened with Beethoven when he was 32? 5) What is your opinion of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata?   z: o 9 -= . U'a c 8'  I think... nO-MoeMY... In my opinion... no MoeMY MHeHlI1tO... I fi nd it... $1 HaXO>KY ee... To my mind... nO-MoeMY... Well, to my mind it is one of his greatest works. 5. Explain. 1) "He took extra lessons in secret." 2) "He had to give up playing.," 3) "We remember him for many great works." 6. BblnHwTe M3 TeKCTa no a 3aaM cneAYIOw.e rpaMMaTH'fe- CKMe SlBneHMSI  nepeCKa)l('1Te KpaTKo ,a>KAbIM a63a1.\: 1) rnaronbl 8 Passive Voice, 2) rnaronbl 8 Past Simple, 3) rnaronbl B cpopMe Gerund, 4) cyw.ecTBVlTenbHble c onpeAeneHHblM apTVlKlleM "the" \lVORDLIST be able to - 6blTb B COCTOfJHVIVI be satisfied ['sretisfaidl- 6blTb AOSOJlbHblM Bonn [bn] - 60HH choral ['kJr( J)1] - XOpOBOi1 compose ('kJm'pguz] - COYVlHfJTb deaf [defJ - rJ1yxoi1 deeply ['di:pli] - rlly6oKo depressed [di'prest] - nOAasneHHbli1, yrHeTeHHblVt Germany [,ct3:mJni]- repMaHVI give up - OTKa3aTbC OT. 6POCVlTb idea [ai'diJ] - VlAeSJ, MbiC/lb including [in'klu:dil)] - BKlltOyaSJ, B TOM YVicne masterpiece ['ma:stgpi:s] - weAeBp opinion ['pinjJn] - MHeHt-1e . sketch ['skeif] - Ha6pocoK, 3aMeTKa sound [saund] - 3SYK symphony ['simfJni] - CVlM<t>OHVI "The Moonlight Sonata" ['mu:nJait sg'na:tJ] - "J1YHHa cOHaTa" theory ['8iJri] - TeopVl Vienna [vi'en] - BeHa Unit 9 m 
7. ACKYCC"SI. 1) No physical defects can make a talented person give up creating, can they? (Give your arguments, please.) 2) Have you ever heard Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata? 3) Why is his Ninth Symphony so popular for the theory of composing music?" 8. Are you sorry or proud for such people as Beethoven? (Give your reasons, please.) \  , , I Who was Johann Sebastian Bach? Johann Sebastian Bach was a famous German composer. Bach was born in 1685. He was taught music first by his father, who was a professional musician, and then, when his father died, by his brother. He composed 48 preludes and fugues which are studied in every musical school now. He also wrote a lot of church music. His music for church choirs includes 200 cantatas. He led a life full of hardships. Unfortunately, neither his contemporaries nor his sons who also were talented musicians could understand how talented Bach was. His name became world famous only in the nineteenth century. In 1747. he lost his sight. He died very soon after- wards, in 1750. Questions: 1) Who took part in teaching Bach music? 2) What other composers were Bach's contemporaries? 3) Do you like choral singing? 4) Have you ever heard church music? What can you say about it? 5) Do you often go to the concerts in the Conservatoire? _ 'Io.1  . .';j' A.,. , .ir\"' - . ", .J . I" J' . ,,,,0- . , t' 'I  ; I   ' - \, -::- ' '" A ,,' ,\ ):'" 'fl \I\ , ' ...11\ .., . , ..: . \, 0.. . '. - . 9. Explain, please. "He was taught music by his brother." 1 o. BblnW"Te rnaronbl B Passive Voice M KpaTKO nepeCKa>KTe TeKCT. 11. A"CKYCCS1. 1) Was A. Vivaldi S. Bach's contemporary? (Did they live in the same century?) 2) Why could Bach's father teach him music? 3) Do you like to listen to A. Vivaldi or S. Bach? (Give your arguments, please. ) 4) S. Bach was a catholic, wasn't he? (Give your arguments, please.) WORDLIST afterwards ['a:ftd\Vddz] - BnOCJleACTBiI1V1, nOTOM argument ['a:gjulnnt] - AOBOA, aprYMeHT cantata [kren'ta:td]- KaHTaTa catholic ['kedlik] - KarOJlVlK choir ['kwaid] - Xop conservatoire [kdn'S;):vt\va:J - KOHcepBaTOpVl contemporary lkgn'tcmp(:) )rgri]- COBpeMeHHVlK die [dai] - YM1t1paTb include [in'klu:d] - BKJltOaTb musician r nlju:'zifn 1- MY3blKaHT physical defect ['fizik( ) 1 di'fekt] - <pVl3lt1YeCKiI1 HeAOCTaTOK professional [pr'fef(:) )nl] - npo<peccVloHanbHbl sight [sait] -3peH1t1e talented rtldntidJ - TanaHTJ1V1Bbli1 Em I!-.J 
Who was Mozart Mozart was the greatest Austrian composer. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart lived only 35 years, but in that time he became one of the world's most famous composers. Mozart was born in Austria in 1756. He began composing at the age of five. His father was a musician and he taught his son to play different instruments. As a very young child his father took him on a tour of Europe, playing before royalty. From the age of six he toured Europe and gave concerts in Austria, Germany, France, Italy and Switzerland. As a young man, Mozart settled in Vienna. He wrote symphonies and several great operas, including "The Marriage of Figaro", and "The Magic Flute". He died very suddenly after a short illness. Rumour had it that he had been poisoned, but it is more likely that he had a weak heart. He died so poor that only the gravedigger attended his funeral. There are many legends around Mozart's death. They say two weeks before his death a man in black visited him anonymously and ordered him to write a requiem. Mozart agreed because he needed money badly. He was a romantic and impressionable nlan. He felt sure that it was his death. The visitor in black was just a certain count who wanted to publish the requiem as his own composition. Questions: 1 ) What can you tell us about Mozart's childhood? 2) Have you seen any films about Mozart's life? 3) What Mozart operas do you know? 4) What instruments could Mozart play? 5) What do you think of the legends around Mozart's death? ........ ,I. ,\ -. .-t... \ "J. __ \"':W":'jI,. , ' ,....r.. 1,' 1 .  \ "':I.. ' \" . ..\,.... , t y .... .-- , g.. .. - . 12. Explain, please: "He died very suddenly." 13. BblnHwTe H3 TeKCTa cneAYIOw.e rpaMMaT'IeCKe SlBneHR H KpaTKO nepeCKa)l(MTe TeKCT: 1) rnaronbl B Past Simple, 2) cyecTBTenbHble c HeonpeAeneHHblM apTKneM "a", 3) C04eTaH cyw.ecTBTenbHblx c npeAllOraM. WORDLIST agree [g'gri:] - cornaWaTbCs:l anonymously ['n::>niIl1sli] - aHOHVlMHO Austria [':->:stri] - ABcTps:I Austrian ['::>:stridn] - aBCTpVlelt certain [Isg:tn] - onpeAeneHHbl, 3A. OAH count [kaunt] - rpacp death [dg8] -CMepTb France [fra: ns] - <PpaHUVls:I funeral ['fju:n;)rdJ] - noxopoHbl gravedigger [greiv'digJ] - MOrnbL1tVlK illness ['il n is] - 60ne3Hb impressionable [i m IpreJ( J)n db I] - BneaTJlVlTeJlb- H,BocnpVlMVlBi1 Italy ['itJli] -lt1TaJ1V1s:1 legend f'lect5( d )nd] - nereHAa marriage ['mrerict3] - 6paK, )f(eHVlTb6a opera ['::>p( d )rJ] - onepa poison ['p:->i zn] - OTpaBns:lTb poor [pUJ] - 6eAHbl publish ['pAbJin - ny6J1KOBaTb, 3AaBaTb requiem ['rekwiJm, 'rekwienl] - peKBVleM romantic [rd'mrentik] - pOMaHTYHbI, pOMaHTVI- ecKi1 royalty['r::>idlti] - neHbl KoponeBcKo ceMbVl rumour ['ru:md 1- cnyx, MOJlBa settle [se t]] - nOCens:lTbCs:l several ['sevr{ d)l] - HeCKonbKO suddenly ['sAdnli] - BAPyr. BHe3anHO Switzerland rs\.vits]Jnd] - WBe£1uaps:I liThe Magic Flute" ['mrect3ik flu:t] - "Bonwe6HaSJ neTa" tour [t U;)] - cOBepwaTb rypHe Unit 9 Em 
14. ACKYCCMSI. 1 ) Mozart was a very talented composer, wasn't he? (Give your reasons, J please.) I 2) Why is his music so popular all over the world? 3) Have you heard any of his operas? 4) Which music do you prefer: that by A. Vivaldi, S. Bach or Mozart? Tchaikovsky Pyotr lIyich Tchaikovsky, an outstanding Russian composer, was born in Votkinsk in 1840. He was fond of music since his early childhood. His mother sang him. beautiful-songs and taught him to play the piano. But Pyotr lIyich graduated from the Petersburg Conservatoire only in 1866 because. of his poor living conditions. He was the best pupil of Anton Rubinshtein. When the Moscow Conservatoire was founded Pyotr lIyich became a professor there. He created wonderful music: ten operas, three ballets, six symphonies, seven large symphonic poems and many other musi- cal pieces. "Eugene Onegin", a new type of opera. was a great success all over the world. His "Swan Lake", "The Nutcracker", "The Sleeping Beauty" are musical m?sterpieces. Besides, Tchaikovsky was a great conduc- tor, and he conducted lot of operas and symphonies himself. In his music he used folk melodies for the musical descriptions of Russian nature and life. Tchaikovsky became the first Russian doctor of music abroad. He came back from Cambridge famous all over the world. Tchaikovsky's compositions are full of realism. Though he wrote his operas and ballets in the 19th century they are real to us now. Tchaikovsky died in 1893, but his music continues to live; it will live forever. His'music is played by the musicians of all countries and continents. In 1958 at the First International festival named after Tchaikovsky an American pianist Van Cliburn won the first prize, brilliantly performing the first concert for the piano and orchestra by T chaikovsky. I .il I # 1--\ ilI Iii < · . "I", - ;'.. ' ,t _';$,"f:<. .:\ :p .. ';Jl' .I: . \ '" , 11 II . . -' 1 ..... .. ...-, ,",\" "', ," I ' JI' f' 1r I .ti }fj I .I  ..,,1)- '''' .' . :\. ,i' ll- J"' - , . . .'\.... 1 . 'I . . / 1/' :, rl. II ,.t ' \\ .. - -,".  \' 1/1 I ua ., . a:: .. ==:;  ==- . 0" Questions: 1) What operas by Tchaikovsky do you know? 2) Whose play did Tchaikovsky use for his "The Romeo and Juliet Overture"? 3) Who is your favourite Russian composer? WORDLIST Anton Rubinshtein ['ru:binItain] - AHTOH Py6HwTeH Cambridge ['keimbrictJ - r. KeM6pVlA)K (AHrJl) conductor [kJn'dAkt J - AVlpVl>Kep conservatoire [kdn'S;}:vdtwU:] - KOHcepBaTOp description [dis'kripI(;} )n] - OnLt1CaHVle doctor of music - AOKTOP (yYeHa cTeneHb) MY3blKVI "Eugene Onegin" [ju:'<ti:n n;}'gin] - UEBreHVlM OHerVlH" folk melody ['f;}lk 'melgdi] - HapOAHa MeJ10AVI graduate from rgrredjueit] -OKOHVlTb ye6Hoe 3aBeAeHVle 234 Unit 9 "Nutcracker" ['nAt,k rrekg] - "li.leJ1KYHYVlK" perform [p;}'f:m] - VlcnonHTb, VlrpaTb Petersburg ['pi:tgzbg:g] - neTep6ypr pianist ['piJnist] - nVlaHVlCT "Swan Lake" ['swn 'leik] - "Ile6eAVlHoe 03epo" "The Romeo and Juliet Overture" ['r;}uo1idU dnd 'ct5u:ljgt ';)UVgtjUg] - YBepnopa uPoMeo VI A>t<ynbeT- Ta" "The Sleeping Beauty" ['sli:pil) 'bju:ti] - "Cn KpacaBVlu.a" Van Cliburn ['vren klai'bdn] - BaH KnVl6epH (aMepVlKaHCKVI nVlaHVlcT) 
4) What concert halls do you know in Moscow? (The Tchaikovsky Hall, the Bolshoi Conservatoire Hall, the Maly Conservatoire Hall) 5)' When did you last go to the Tchaikovsky or the Bolshoi Conservatoire Hall? 6) Where does the Tchaikovsky contest take place? 15. Explain: "P. Tchaikovsky is probably best known as the com- poser of ballet music." 16. BblnMwMTe M3 TeKCTa cneAYlO114Me rpaMMaT'IeCKe SlBneHSI: 1) rnaronbl B Passive Voice, 2) rnaronbl B Past Simple, 3) C04eTaH cyw.ecTBTenbHblx c npeAnorOM. 17. AMCKYCCMSI. 1) Why are these works (compositions) so popular? (Look at paragraph 3.) 2) His music is known to all classes (strata, levels) of people (rich and poor, old and young, common or aristocratic etc.), isn't it? (Give your argu- ments. please.) 3) Have you seen any ballet by Tchaikovsky? (Was it by TV or at the theatre?) 4) Did T chaikovsky reflect his love for the nature of his country or any other countries too? A .1' '" Who was Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) Prokofiev composed his first piece of music when he was five. He entered the St. Petersburg Conservatoire at the age of 13, he brought to his entrance examination four operas, a symphony and a number of piano pieces. After the October Revolution Prokofiev emigrated to America. However he soon realized that it had been a bitter mistake. But living abroad Prokofiev remained Russian, a citizen of his country. At the height of his fame Prokofiev still felt unhappy, home- sick and lonely, living far from his native land. He missed Russia and kept thinking about going back. He believed that a composer who had lost his roots and musical traditions of his nation would inevita- bly lose the desire to compose and to create. It was only his motherland that could give him spiritual strength and be a pure source of inspiration. Between 1927 and 1932 Prokofiev took several trips to the Soviet Union. His concerts in Moscow and Leningrad aroused great interest among the mu- sic lovers. People listened to his music in complete silence. During these con- certs Prokofiev felt that he was listened to by his compatriots. f . ' .. i fl \ -1 , L ,  . .. \' - ....' l.r . ;i \ , . \  WORDLIST arouse [d'rauz] - Bb13b1SaTb bitte r ['b it J] - rOpbKlt1£1, >KeCTOKVI i1 changeable ['ijcinct5Jbl] - 6blcTpOMeHtOw.lt1£1c contest ['kntcst] - KOHKypC complete [kJm'pli:t] - nOJlHbl£1 create [kri:'cit] - TSOpVlTb, C03AaBaTb desire [di'zai] - CVlllbHoe >KenaHlt1e devote r di'vJut] - nocBw.aTb dying r dai if)] - YMVlpatOw.t-1£1 emigrate ['emigreit] - 3MVlrpVlposaTb enter ['entJ] - nocrynaTb (s) fame [feim] - CJlaBa, Vl3seCTHOCTb feel homesick ['humsik] - TOCKosaTb no AOMY, no pOAVlHe height [hait]- SblCOTa heritage ['heritict5J - HaClleAVIe homeland ['hJumlrend] - pOAHa, OTe'ieCTBO however [hau'ev] -OAHaKO inevitably [in'evitJbli] - HeVl36e)f(HO miss - cKY'iaTb no realize ['riJlaiz] - nOHVlMaTb, OC03HasaTb remain [ri'mein] - OCTasaTbC root [ru:t] - KopeHb strata ['stra:tJ] -CJ10Vl (o6w.ecTBa) Unit- 9 m 
g.. ..' - . When he came to Russia in 1927 he wrote: "I have to live in the atmosphere of my homeland. I have to see Russian winter and its changeable spring. I have to hear the Russian language and talk to people who are my people, so that they give me back something I lack here - their songs, my songs. Yes, I am going back!" In 1932 after his return to the Soviet Union, Prokofiev devoted all his inspi- ration to his people. For 20 years until he died in 1953 he served his country In his new compositions he strove for clarity. The influence of Prokofiev's mu- sic can still be traced in the works of contemporary musicians. His invaluable heritage includes eight operas, seven cantatas, seven ballets, seven sympho- nies as well as numerous piano pieces. Among them there are such master- . pieces as the opera "War and Peace," the ballet "Romeo and Juliet," and the cantata "Alexander Nevsky." Questions: 1) What music education did Sergei Prokofiev get? 2) How did it happen that he left Russia? 3) What was his attitude towards Russia? 4) What Russian composers are especially famous abroad? 5) What operas by Prokofiev do you know? 6) Do you like his pieces? Why? 18. Explain, please. 1) "Soon he realized that it had been a bitter mistake." 2) lilt was only his motherland that could be a source of inspiration." 3) "He was listened to by his compatriots." 4) "I lack my songs." 19. BblnWTe 3 TeKCTa no a63al.\aM cneAYIOl1.\l-1e rpaMMaTL1e- CKe S1BneHL1S1: 1) cYL.U.eCTBLt1TenbHble c HeonpeAeneHHblM apTL1KneM "a", 2) rnaronbl B Past Simple, 3) cYLlleCTBLt1TenbHble c npeAIlOraMLt1, 4) rnaron have to B ero MOAanbHOM 3Ha4eHLt1Lt1. 20. ACKYCCS1 1) S. Prokofiev could find inspiration to write music only in his native land, couldn't he? (Give your arguments, please.) 2) Did he really love Russia? Have you heard any pieces of his music? 3) Why do many composers take ideas for their compositions from folk mu- sic? (Give your arguments, please.) 4) Do you like classic or jazz music? (Give your arguments, please.) WORDLIST clarity ['klreriti] - CHOCTb compatriot [k;}m'pretri;}t] - COOTeyeCTSeHHVlK influence ['influ;}nsJ - BllHlt1e inspiration Linsp'reifn] - BAOXHOBeHt'1e invaluable [in'vreljubll- 6ecueHHbl lack [Irek J - VlcnblTblBaTb HeAOCTaTOK, He XBaTaTb lover ['11\ v ] -1l106V1Tellb motherland ['m1\o;}lrend] - pOAVlHa, OTeyeCTBO 236 Unit 9 risk - pVlCKosaTb serve [SJ:v] - CJlVlTb source [s:s] - VlCTOYHIttK spirituall'spiriu-ul] -AYXOBHbl, OAyxoTBopeHHblilt strength 1st re 1) e] - CVlJla strive [straiv] (strove, striven) - CTapaTbC, CTpeMTbC trace [treis] - npOCJle>KVlBaTb 
-..;- -- - - \ \- ... IIII!I 11m II ACKYCCSI Ha TeMY "H3BeCTHble KOMn03Topbl" 21. Bbl6epMTe KOMno3MTopa 1r13 Tex, 0 KOM Bbl TonbKO \lTO npO'fM- TanM, M paCCKa>KMTe 0 HeM, Mcnonb3YSl cneAYIOll\ e cnOBa M '"'nOBOCO"leTaHMSI. 1) well-known, professional, great, famous, best-known, popular 2) to like, to be fond of, to adore 3) a musician, a composer 4) an opera, a composition, a ballet, a cantata, a piano piece, a masterpiece, a concert 5) musical traditions (of...), spiritual strength, invaluable heritage, to have inspiration 6) to compose, to write music, to create, to listen to, to write down musical ideas, to trace the influence, to inspire, to introduce 22. cnonb3YTe onMcaHMM M3 eCTHblX M bIKaHTOB: 1) CLt1HOHLt1Mbl: well-known, famous, best-known. 2) . rnaronbl: to like, to adore, to be fond of, 3) npL-1naraTenbHble: talented, gifted, creative, 4) cnOBOC04eTaHL-1f1: musical traditions of, spiritual strength, invaluable heri- tage, to have inspiration, 5) cyw.ecTBLt1TenbHble: composition, ballet, cantata, a masterpiece, a musi- cian, a composer, an opera, a symphony, a piano piece, inspiration, a concert. 23. Bbln"WTe M3 TeKCTOB Ha6onee \iaCTO BCTpe'"lalOHeCSI rna- r on bl. to compose, to create, to listen to (music), to trace (the influence). 2 . BblAel1Te oco6ble 'IepTbl Ka>KAOrO KOMn03MTopa. BMeCTe c coceAOM no napTe Bbl6ep Te KOMn03Topa, 0 KOTOpOM Bbl XOTMTe HancaTb TO, TO 3anOMHMn. HanMWTe 0 HeM M 06- MeHSITeCb APyr c APyroM HanMcaHHbiM. 25. Read and do. There are many kinds of good music, and each has its place. Even very small children enjoy listening to mu- sic that expresses different feelings. Materials Needed Collect some music by well-known classical composers. Many radio sta- tions play music written by these composers. Peter and the Wolf (Prokofiev) Nutcracker Suite (Tchaikovsky) Scheherazade (Rimski-Korsakov) Sixth Symphony (Beethoven) Mother Goose Suite (Ravel) Preparation Select a piece of music to listen to as a family. Have a family member sum- marize the information on the jacket of the record. If you are using the radio, the announcer may give a brief summary before playing each selection. .. 37 
NAMES OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND PEOPLE WHO PLAY THEM \ /4.. . bassoon [b'su:n] - cparoT bassoonist [b'su:nist] - cparoTVlcT brass [bra:s] - MeAHbie AyxoBbie VlHcTpYMeHTbl cellist ['tfelist] - BVl0J10HeJ1V1CT cello ['tfelu] - BViOllOHyeJ1b clarinet (.klreri'net] - KllapHeT clarinettist [.klreri'netist] - KllapHeTVlCT double-bass [dAbl'beis] - KOHTpa6ac (pI double- basses ['beisiz)) double-bass player - KOHTpa6acLt1CT flautist ['flJ:tist] - cpJ1eTVlCT flute [flu:t] - cpJ1ei1Ta French horn ['frentf 'hJ:n] - BaJ1TOpHa oboe ['ubu] - r060i1 oboist ['ubuist] - r060VlcT / : NAMES OF SOME FAMOUS COMPOSERS Bach [ba:k, ba:x, ba:h] - 6ax (1685-1750), HeMeUKVli1 KOMn03V1Top VI opraHVlCT Bartok ['ba:tJk] -6apToK (1881-1945), BeHrepcKVI£1 KOMn031t1TOp VI nVlaH1.1CT Beethoven ['beithuvn] - 6eTxoBeH (1770-- 1827), HeMeu.KVli1 KOMn03V1Top VI MY3blKaHT Berlioz ['bcliuz] - 6epJ1Lt103 (1803-1869), cppaHUY3cKVI KOMn03V1Top Brahms [b ra: rnz] - 6paMc (1833-1897). HeMeu.Ki1 KOMn03V1Top,nVlaHVlcT,AVlpVlep Britten ['brit()n] -6pLt1TTeH (1913-1976), aHrJlVlCKLt1 KOMn03Lt1Top. nVlaHVlCT, AVlpVlep Chopin ['.fJpCl), '.fuPCl)] - WoneH (1810-1849), nOJlbCKVli1 KOMn03V1Top VI nVlaHVlCT Debussy [d'bu:si:, d'bysi(:)] - Ae610ccVI (1862- 1918), cppaHUY3CKIt1i1 KOMn03V1Top Dvorak ['dv:3a:k] -ABopaK (1841-1904), ewcKVli1 KOMn03V1Top, MY3bIKaHT, AVlpVlep Grieg [gri:g] -rpVlr (1843-1907), HopBecKVli1 KOMn03&t1TOp VI nLt1aHVlCT Handel ['hrendl] - reHAeJlb (1685-1759), aHrJlO- HeMeu.KVli1 KOMn03V1Top, opraHVlCT Haydn ['haidn] - rai1AH (1732-1809), aBcTpVli1cKVli1 KOMn03V1TOp Hindemith ['hindn1it] - XVI HAeM Lt1T (1895-1963). HeMeUKVI KOMn03V1Top, aIlb TViCT Honegger ['hJnig] -OHerrep (1892-1955), cppaHUY3cKVli1 KOMn03V1Top wBeu.apcKoro npoVlcxo- AeHVlS1 Liszt [list] -nLt1CT (1811-1886), BeHrepcKVli1 KOMn03V1Top VI nVlaHVlCT Mendelssohn ['rnendlsn] -MeHAenbcoH (1809- 1847), HeMeu.KVli1 KOMn03V1Top, AVlpVlep, nVlaHVlCT Lt1 opraHVlcT mJ Unit 9 percussion [p'kAf n] - YAapHble VlHcTPYMeHTbl This section consists of various kinds of drums [drAffizj (6apa6aHbl), cymbals ['simb()lz] (Tapel1- KVI) and other instruments for certain works. trombone [trrn'bun] -TPOM60H trombonist [trm'bunjst] -lpOM60HVlcT trumpet ['trArnpit] - Tpy6a trumpeter ['trJ\mpit] -TPy6a viola [vi'ulg] -anbT viola player - anb TIt1CT violin [.vaig'lin] - CKpVlnKa violinist [.vai'linist] - CKplt1na woodwinds ['wudwindz] -AepeBS1HHble AYXOBble VlHCTpYMeHTbl ........,. \ , . .  . .  Mozart r'rnutsa:t] - MouapT (1756-1791), aBcTpVlCKVI KOMn03V1Top VI MY3blKaHT Mussorgsky [rn's:gski] - MycoprcKVli1 (1839- 1881), PYCCKVli1 KOMn03V1Top Prokofiev [pr'kfjefj - npoKocpbeB (1891-1953). PYCCKVI KOMn03V1TOp Puccini [pu'tfi:ni(:)]-nYVlHVI (1858-1924), VlTaIlbS1HCKVli1 KOMn03V1Top Purcell ['p:sel] -nepceJlJ1 (1659-1695), aHrJlVli1- CKVI KOMn03V1TOp Rachmaninov [rrek'rnreninfj - PaxMaHVlHoB (1873-1943), PYCCKVli1 KOMn03V1Top VI nVlaHVlCT Ravel [rre'vel] - PaBeJlb (1875-1937). cppaHUY3cKVI KOMn03V1TOp Schubert ['fu:btJ -Wy6epT (1797-1828), aBcTpVl- CKLt1i1 KOMn03V1Top Schumann ['.fu:mn] -WYMaH (1810-1856), HeMeUKVli1 KOMn03V1Top VI nVlaHLt1CT Shostakovich [Sst'kuvitf] - WocTaKoBVI (1906- 1975), PYCCKVli1 KOMn03V1Top Strauss [st ra us] - WTpayc (1864-1949). HeMeUKVI KOMn03V1Top Stravinsky [str'vinski] -CTpaBVlHcKVli1 (1882- 1971), PYCCKVli1 KOMn031t1TOp Tchaikovsky [tfai'kJfski] -ljaKoBcKVlt1, PYCCKVlL1 KOMn03V1TOp Verdi ['vcgdi] - BepAIt1 (1813-1901), VlTaJlbS1HCKVI KOMn03V1TOp Vivaldi [vi'vreldi] -BVIBaIlbAVI (1678-1741), VlTaIlbS1HCKVli1 CKplt1na VI KOMn03V1Top Wagner ['va:gn] - BarHep (1813-1883), HeMeUKVI KOMn03V1Top VI AVlpVlep Weber ['veib] - Be6ep (1786-1826), HeMeu.KVI KOMn03V1Top  AVlpVlep 
  o · - - . iu KEY Activity When the music begins, ask each person to close his eyes and imagine what the music might be expressing. Tell the others that we are almost always surrounded by sounds, but we learn to "tune them out." Tonight we want to "tune them in." After listening to the music or few minutes, ask the family members the following questions: 1) How does this music make you feel? 2) What colours do you think of when you listen to this music? 3) Can you imagine what might be happening? . 4) Is it fast or slow? Loud or soft? 5) Can you hear a melody? Is it played more than two times? 6) Can you tell when the melody changes a little bit? 7) Can you hear the sounds that are made by the different instruments? 8) Do you feel like quietly moving your hand to the beat of the music? Do it if you like. Do not expect immediate answers. Tell family members to think about their answers while the rest of the music plays. Let them sit back and relax. Avoid loud talking, which could be distracting. Ask the same questions when the music is finished. Respect each person's answer. Each family member is unique and will have a unique response to the same music. Take a walk in the country and pay attention to the sounds of birds, the wind, and even silence. Talk about the sounds. Go home and listen to the third movement of Beethoven's Sixth Symphony. 26. nepeBeAMTe M npOBeAMTe MY3blKanbHYlO BMKTOPMHY. 1) KaKo KOMn03111TOp BneTC OCHOBOnonO)f(HlI1KOM PYCCKO KnaCC1I14eCKO onepbl? 2) KorAa  KeM 6blna OCHOBaHa nepBa pyccKa KOHcepBaTop? 3) 8 KaKX onepax 1I1 KaKM KOMn03111TOpOM OTpa)f(eH MlI1p PYCCKO CKa3KlI1? 4) KaKlI1e 3BeCTHble onepbl  6aneTbi Hanll1CaHbl n. 1I1. aKOBCKlI1M? 5) KTO COHn onepbl "60pc rOAYHOB", "XoBaHw.Ha", "KH3b lt1ropb"? 6) Koro Bbl 3HaeTe 3 COBpeMeHHblX KnaCC4eCKX KOMn03TopOB? 1 - M. . rJlHKa. 2 - B neTep6ypre. B 1862 rOAY, KOMn03TopOM A. r. Py6HwTeHoM. 3 - H. A. Pl1MCKl1-KopcaKoB. Onepbl: "CHerypOYKa". "Kaw.e 6eccMepTHbl", "CKa3Ka 0 u.ape CaJlTaHe", "30JlOT0C1 KJ1tOYl1K", "CaAKo". 4 - Onepbl: "OJlaHTa". "EBreH OHerl1H", "nl1KOBa AaMa". 6aneTbl: "ne6e- AHoe o3epo", "LLleJlKyHYK", "Cns:lw.a KpacaBu.a". 5 - 1&6opc rOAYHOB"  "XoBaHw.Ha" (MycoprcK), "KH3b ropbn (6opo- AH) 6 - CBPl1AOB, WHV1TKe. Unit 9 Em 
24' Un · Writers William Shakespea"re: 1564-1616 William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, where he received an excellent classical education. At the age of eighteen he married Anne Hathaway, and they had three children. Shakespeare was playwright and poet. As he rose in popularity, he wrote plays for the famous Globe Theatre, a round, open-roofed building that housed approximately 2,000 spectators. Lat- er Shakespeare became one of the owners of the Globe Theatre. Unlike many writers who never live to enjoy their fame, Shakespeare achieved great recog- nition during his lifetime. He wrote three types of plays: comedies, tragedies and histories. He also wrote narrative poems, sonnets and lyric poetry. He is acknowledged as one of the greatest writers of all time, and has remained popular with readers around the world. Charles Dickens: 1812-1870 Charles Dickens was a novelist who provided Victorian England with one of its greatest champions of reform. Dickens used his novels to identify and ad- dress many problems of the nineteenth century, such as child abuse, unfair labour practices, unjustices in the legal system, and weaknesses in education. Dickens had experienced many of these problems in his own childhood, -and so he dedicated his life to bringing about social reform. Some of his most popular novels include, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, and Great Expectations. Rudyard Kipling: 1865-1936 Rudyard Kipling was an English novelist, short-story writer and poet. He is most widely known for his works for children, especially the "Jungle Book." Kipling was born in Bombay, India, in 1865 but attended school in England. After completing his education, he returned to India where he worked as a newspaper reporter for several years. Many of Kipling's stories and novels reflect his experiences in India and convey the importance of duty and unself- ishness. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1907. Washington Irving: 1783-1859 The first American writer to gain international attention was Washington Irv- ing. He was born to a wealthy New York family and received an excellent edu- cation. He began his writing career by creating satires about New York society. He later wrote about the Dutch influences upon the city in its early days. He attempted to give America a sense of a romantic past like that found in Europe, and he recorded some of the important developments in the exploration of the western regions of the country. His most popular work by far was The Sketch Book, which contains two of his most beloved stories, "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle." f Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: 1807-1882 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was one of the most widely read American poets of the 19th century. From 1835 to 1854 he was Smith Professor of Mod- ern Languages at Harvard. In 1884, 2 years after his death, he became the first American to be honoured with a bust in the Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey, London. He is best remembered for poems such as "The Song of Hia- watha" and "Paul Revere's Ride." 
Mark Twain: 1835-1910 Mark Twain left his hometown of Hannibal, Missouri at the age of eighteen. His real name was Samuel Clemens, but he took his penname from a term used by the men who operated the river boats. They would call, "By the mark, twain!" This meant that the river was two (twain) feet deep. Mark Twain began his career as a newspaper writer. Later in life he used memories from his child- hood to create some of his most popular novels, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Twain used humour to develop many serious themes in his novels and to help society see itself more clearly. O.Henry: 1862-1910 O'Henry is a well-known American short-story writer. He had to earn his living from the age of fifteen and he educated himself with the help of friends. O'Henry knew people very well, especially the ordinary people of New York. In his stories you can feel satirical criticism of the American way of life. Most of his short stories are full of warm sympathy for ordinary American people. O'Henry was the penname used by author William Sydney Porter. Porter was a great admirer of another American writer, Edgar Allan Poet and he was influenced by Poe's style. O'Henry wrote many popular stories and earned a reputation as the master of surprise endings. He was especially talented at developing his characters, and at portraying city life accurately. He wrote over 600 stories. WORDLIST abuse [J'bju:z] - oCKop6JleHVle accurately ['rekjurt] i] - TOltHO achieve recognition ['tfi:v ,rekg'niJ( d )n] - nOJ1Y- ltVlTb npit13HaHit1e admirer [d'mair] - n0KJ10HHit1K, 060)l(aTellb approximately ['prksimitli] - npVl6JlVl3V1TeJ1bHO attend ['tend] - nocew.aTb be acknowledged [k'nliQ)d] - 6blTb npVl3HaHHbiM Bombay [bm'bei] - 60M6et1 bust [bAst] - 610CT career [k'ri d] - Kapbepa comedy ['kmdi] - KOMeAVI contain [kn'tein] -cOAep>KaTb, 3A. BKJ1tOltaTb convey [kn'vei] - Bblp(l)KaTb criticism ['kritisiznl]- Kpit1TVlKa developing [di'veIJpit)] - C03AaHVle Dutch [dAtf]- rOllllaHAcKVli1 earn [:n] -3aClly>KVlBaTb Edgar Allan Poe ['edg Irelan 'pJu] - 3Arap no (1809-1849) - aMepVlKaHcKVI nit1CaTellb-pOMaHTit1K educate ['edju:keit] - AaBaTb 06pa30BaHVle, BocnVl- TblBaTb ending ['endilJ] - KOHeu especially [is'peJ( d)li] - oc06eHHo feel [fi:l] ( felt, felt) -ltYBcTBoBaTb gain international attention - nOJ1YltLt1Tb Me>KAYHapOA- Hoe npVl3HaHVle Globe Theater ['g]aub 'eiat] - TeaTp urJ106yc'' Hannibal ['hrenibl] - raHHVl6all Harvard ['ha:vJd] - rapBapA identify [ai'dentifai] - OTO>KAeCTBJlTb influence ['infludns]- OKa3blBaTb BJ1it1HLt1e (Ha) "Jungle Book" l'Q)Al)gl buk] - "KHVlra A>KYHrne" Missouri [mi'zudri] - MViccyPVI (wTaT CWA) narrative ['nrertiv] - anVilteCKL1i1 ordinary [':dnri] -06blltHbli1, 06bIKHoBeHHbl penname ['penneim] -J1V1TeparypHbli1 nceSAOHVlM playwright ['pleirait] -ApaMarypr popularity Lppju'lreriti] - nonYJ1pHOCTb portray [p:'trei] - onVlCblBaTb reputation [.repju'teifn]- penYTauVl satire ['sretaia] - caTVIpa satirical [sa'tirkl] - CaTVlpVllteCKVI sonnet ['snit] - COHeT spectator [spek'teit] - 3pVlTeJ1b Stratford-upon-Avon ['strretfad 'pJn 'eivdn] paTPA-Ha-3BoHe style ['staH] - CTVlJ1b surprise [sa'praiz]- HeO>KVlAaHHbli1 sympathy ['simpei] - COltYBcTBVle, CIl1MnaTit1 talented ['treldntid] -TallaHTllVlBbli1 the Nobel Prize ['ndubJ 'praizJ - H06elleBCKa5t npe- M tragedy ['trrect3idi] - TpareAVI unselfishness LAn 'sel fif n is] - 6ecKopblcTVle Victorian [vik't3:rian] England-AHrJ1V1 snoxit1 KOpO- J1eBbl BLt1KTopVlit1 wealthy ['weI8i] - COCTOTellbHbli1 Westminster Abbey ['westminstr 'rebi] - BecT- MVlHCTepCKoe a66aTcTBo William Porter ['wiljm 'p:t] - YVlJ1bM nopTep Unit 9 
Author Review 2 . Match a) William Shakespeare 1 . b) Washington Irving c) O'Henry 2. d) Charles Dickens 3. e) Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4. f) Rudyard Kipling g) Mark Twain 5. 6. KEY 7. 1b; 2g; 3a;4d; 5c; 6f;7e. , "''\ \..- . r,':'- ... .... 1" -.: r ....  'I' .'  / ' '\ " \ - . .' , .  ,\\.  {'" \;.- ,)! I.. , \ r '" ."' . . , ., , .... , ", .\ ..."!--- '. \" . 'If ,It.t , " ,t \ , .. . , .' ...\ . , !; . ,,{. '\ I" 0" Washington Irving O'Henry The first American writer to earn international recognition. This author's real name was Samuel Clemens. He built the famous Globe Theatre in London. He used his novels to encourage social re- forms in England. Surprise endings were this writer's character- istic trademark. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1907. He became the first American to be honoured with a bust in the Poets' Corner of Westmin- ster Abbey, London. '-- - ,." .t' I r- ! . ......:",' _ ... -- -.-:.' \'\' - ' l' -: .;' .... ,f,.  ;' <. t (. , .;, 1-.;( /, ! .  ,. I . 7 .6:;. ,\.', 1, ,"'. " r-}. . " ...... I "I"}i' .J', t ...." . " . \' . , !.Ii ,,-( . . '. r"... \-\  " "'.' " _'-, / .' . I , \ f' , '  l"" 8 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Mark Twain .' : } '. I ,  ... .i} .- .-,,\ ..\ --:  .. -,'A; '" \ I ;.'(" ... .1.. ' I , I .r . < \-t.....  ,: '. ' \..... ''' - I, "" .. " , . 'Ill I; ,-J  { . .' t j r ; 1\ I .,' '.....' i\ ("",. :\,\ \ .  .  J . I \. :.., \ "j .I;!\ '. , r' :. :t: .' . (. ..j , .' , . : "\\\'F" / ..., .' ( t'l;:.::--.'I , .t;,:J,'; ...,." ....;-;' ":r:: ,,' "II" -.1 " ,j ,'. I ii'li ," . "!!I.tll'  ,.. J . . tl I., n" t' ," ... p ,,'; .'. , .,..... . (,) '>.1, . '0./ ' .. -- ,-, , "' I . '. . . , 1 . ':  , ,- , William Shakespeare Charles Dickens Rudyard Kipling fm I!mD 
Who was Agatha Christie (1890-1976) By Deryk James With her 78 crime novels, Agatha Christie has the distinction of being the world's best-selling writer, and liThe Mousetrap", one of her 19 plays, has run longer than any other production in the histo- ry of the British theatre. Agatha Christie was born in T orquay, a fashionable coastal re- sort in southwest England, in September 1890. Her father, Freder- ic Miller, was an American keen on amateur theatricals. Despite her mother's view that no child should be allowed to read until the age of eight, so as not to damage eyes or brain, Agatha managed to find books to read, including Jules Verne's science fiction. She liked devising word and number puzzles. Her formal schooling did not start until she was 13, and two years later she went to France to study history, art, and dancing. When Mr. Miller died, Agatha's mother fell ill. Advised to seek a warmer climate, she chose Egypt and left for Cairo with Agatha, who was then 20. By the 1970s she was regarded as the queen of mystery writers. She died in 1976 at the age of 85. It is impossible to say exactly how many of her books have been sold, but it is more than a billion copies in English and another billion in 63 foreign lan- guages. In 1995 her sales were still running at three million a year. She is the most widely published author of any time in any language, being outsold only by The Bible. Questions: 1) What was Agatha Christie's nationality? 2) Where was Agatha Christie born? 3) What kind of books did Agatha Christie write? 4) What novels by Agatha Christie do you know? 5) What novels by Agatha Christie have you read? 6) What is your favourite story (play) by Agatha Christie? 7) What plays by Agatha Christie have been staged in Russia? 8) What plays have you seen? 9) What was Agatha Christie famous for? 10) What American and English writers of the 20th century do you know? 11) Who is your favourite English (American) writer? 12) Who are the most well-known English (American) writers alive? {.,.. '.' \" 1 \ . \ .\ oJ. .... I' -" t , I tI. t' I' ./ . \. .. . f . 'f "': r ..;;:... ""-,,\\, ... . - , ."'t' t  cA.:,' ::' . ......  I I' \" , .\ H...' . .;\\ . _' , '.' H' l '. .'  ',' \ .,\ 'II '\' '\ :.  \.. .. " ... :z o · ;:: . ......  g  WORDLIST advised [d'vaizd]- Cf1eAYS1 cOBery Agatha Christie ['reg;)e 'kristi] -AraTa KpVlCTVI amateur theatrical ['reln;;>t: Si'retrikJI] - ll106V1- Tef1bCKLt1e CneKTaKnVl be keen on [ki:n] -YBTleKaTbCR be regarded [ri'ga:did] - CYVlTaTbC5I best-selling ['best 'selil)J writer-aBTop KHVlr, KOTO- pble npOAatOTcS1 JlYYUJe APyrVlx brain [brein] - M03r Cairo ['kai;;>rJu] - r. KaVip coast resort ['kJust ri'z:J:t] - npVl6pe>KHbli1 KYPOpT crime novel [kraim 'nvl] -AeTeKTVlBHbli1 pOMaH damage ('drem ict5] - BpeAVlTb despite Idis'paitJ - HeCMOTp51 Ha devising [di'vaizil)] - BbIAYMaHHbli1 distinction (di'stil)kfnJ - Vl3BeCTHOCTb Frederic Miller ['fredrik 'm i IJ] - <PpeAepVlK ML-1Jl- Tlep Jules Verne ['cBu:1 v:n] - )t(tOllb BepH (1828- 1905) - cppaHl\Y3CKLt1i1 nViCaTeJlb, OAVlH L-13 OCHOBaTe- Ile£1 >KaHpa HaHoi1 cpaHTaCTli1KVI mystery ['mistri] writer - nViCaTeTlb AeTeKTVlBOB outsell [aut'sel] (outsold, outsold) - npOAaBaTbCS: J1yYwe. eM APyroi1 TOBap puzzle r pAzI] - rOJlOBOJlOMKa, wapa.n.a science fiction ['sa i  ns 'fikf n ] - HayYHaS1 cpaHTacn1Ka liThe Mousetrap" ('maustrrep] -"MblWeJlOBKa" Torquay It:J:'ki:] - r. TopKVI B AHrJlVlVl ImmD m 
Science, inventions, discoveries Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) Leonardo was the greatest artist in the world. He was also an astronomer, an architect, and an engineer who made hundreds of inventions. He loved to make wonderful machines. His imagination made him impatient, and it was hard for him to finish anything. Leonardo would buy lovely birds at the bird market. Taking them to his tower, he set them free. Leonardo studied their flight careful- Iy. I, too, will fly, he thoug ht. So he made a machine with wings and ropes and pedals, and Marco, his youngest pupil, tested it. The machine trembled and shook like a bowl of pudding, but it did not fly. Leonardo made many such machines. Next, Leonardo made the giant figure of a man on horseback. It was to be the largest statue in the world, but it was never cast in bronze. Some said the metal was sent off to make a cannon. Some said that Leonardo did not know how to finish the statue. Leonardo made drawings of the bones, muscles, and organs of human beings and animals. He also explored the life of plants, flowers, and trees. His 5000 pages of notebooks are a jumble of notes and drawings. He drew stars, flowers, geometrical forms, and a horse's head side by side. Leonardo studied the heavens and made notes on the wonders of the landscape of the skies. In 1492 most people believed that the earth was the center of the Universe, steadfast and immovable, with the sun and stars revolving around it. Leonardo's studies told him something else. In his notebooks he wrote left- handed and backwards. Why? Perhaps it was to keep people from reading what they could not understand. In one notebook is the sentence: EVOM TON SEOD NUS EHT (THE SUN DOES NOT MOVE). At last Leonardo began to paint. He made a design so extraordinary that all Florence came to marvel. Alas! The wall was as porous as a sponge! As the paint sank in, the wonderful picture disappeared before their eyes. So he painted the Mona Lisa instead. ,- - -....... , 1 \ / ,.-"  /; If :i/= - -< 1 (' l-#" .. .. ' '\  \J ' I' " ' . I ,.1 {; ". <;r.; .- " ..: .,1 YJ y J'''i ' .' j // J " '. _" \ -," . " :... . ,"'. , '" , I " i,>t" ?,: "'11 "". \ ' . \ :'\1"J\ ': · {1 II' ,1 " ).). . ,\ " ", '\ \ \.h'''li.\t .' . ", . 1 'If 1,:' . l )}? '.I , f ,. '\ {  ( J "d'\ ' , . i' '. . !, l ", I' ! .1' J I fAI I WORDLIST astronomer ['str3n m  ] - aCTpOHOM backwards ['brekwz] - B 06paTHoM HanpaBl1eHVIVI bone [bun] - KOCTb bronze [br3nz] - 6poH3a cannon ['krenn] - nywKa, 0PYAVle carefully ['k£fuli] - 3a60Tl1Lt1BO, BHt1MaTeJ1bHO cast [ka:st] - OTl1V1BaTb explore [iks'p13:] - VlCCl1eAOBaTb, Vl3aTb figure ['fig] - ct>Vlrypa flight [flait] - nOl1eT geometrical [<ui'mctrikl] - reoMeTpVllfecKVI giant ['cBaint] - orpoMHbl horseback ['h3:sbrek] - BepXOM Ha JlOWa.o. human being ['hju:mn 'bi:ilJ] -lfellOBeK imagination [i,mrecBi'neifn] - Bo06pa)KeHLt1e, ct>aH- Ta3V1 immovable [i'mu:vb]] - HenOAB>KHbl impatient [im'peif(  )nt] - HeTepneJ1Lt1Bbli1 invention [in'venf()n] - Vl306peTeHVle 244 Unit 9 jumble r'cBAmbl] - K)'lfa, KVlna landscape ['lrenskeip] - ne3aJK, llaHAwact>T Leonardo da Vinci [.li(u)na:du do: 'vinui(:)] -- neoHapAo Aa BVlHlfVl machine [m'fi:n] -- MaWHa. MexaH3M muscle ['mAs]] - Mblwu.a, MYCKYll note [nut] --3aMeTKa, 3anlt1Cb organ ['3:gn] - opraH pedal [pedl] -- neAaI1b revolve [ri'v3Iv] - Bpaw.aTbCS1 rope [rup] - BepeBKa, TpOC sentence rsentns] - npeAflO)KeHVle set free - oCB060>KAaTb shake Ueik] (shook,shaken)-KalfaTbc steadfast ['stedfa:st] - YCTOlflt1Bbli1 tremble ('tremb]] -TpS1CTCb universe ['ju:nivsl - MVlp, BCeJleHHa wing - KpblllO wonder ['wAnd] -liYAO 
I .... B ;:: u. ., g  Questions: 1) When did Leonardo da Vinci live? 2) What pictures of Leonardo do you know? 3) What is peculiar about his pictures? 4) Do you know the most prominent landscape painters in England? 5) What modern painters of England (Russia) do you know? f '. .   Faraday puts electricity to work 1. Michael Faraday, who was born in 1791 and died in 1867, gathered together and set in order all the work of the scientists who had worked on electrical problems before him. 2. In 1823, he discovered how to make an electrical motor. In 1831, he built the first generator, then called it dynamo. The modern car has both a starting motor and a generator. The start- ing motor draws electric current from the car battery to start the powerful gasoline engine. The generator is driven by the gasoline engine to recharge the battery and to furnish electric power for all the electrical conveniences in the car. 3. In 1833, Faraday discovered the effect of passing an elec- tric current through certain solutions. He called these effects the laws of electrolysis. This has made possible the refinement of metals, sliver and gold plating, and the manufacture of many chemical prod- ucts. 4. As a result of Faraday's work, Morse was able to invent the electro-mag- netic telegraph, Bell, the telephone, and Edison, the electric light. \ , 1:. .__.'."._--I\\ .' .f L"r;l ,\,\.... , ......,- . ;0 '\ !Q  o . - = . 111 !!:".  0;'  "" " ' 28. BblnwMTe M3 TeKCTa no a63aaM clleAYIOw.e rpaMMaTMe- CKMe SlBneHMR M KpaTKO nepeCKa>KMTe a63a: 1) rnaron B Past Perfect 3 1 a63au.a, 2) rnaronbl B Past Simple 3 2 a63au.a, Bblpa)f(alOw.e nocneAOBaTenbHOCTb AecTB, 3) rnaronbl B <popMe Infinitive co 3Ha4eHeM "AJ1 Toro 4T06bl..." 3 3 a63au.a, 4) rnaronbl B Past Simple, Bblpa)f(alOw.e nocneAOBaTenbHOCTb AeCTB1-1, 3 4 a63au.a, 5) rnaron, rOBop 0 pe3ynbTaTax 1-1CCneAOBaH c:Dapa.n.e, 3 3 a63au.a, 6) rnaronbl, Bblpa)f(alOw.e B03MO)f(HOCTb AanbHewx 306peTeH£1, 1-13 4 a6- 3au.a. Questions: 1) Was Faraday a true scientist? 2) He lived in the 19th century, didn't he? 3) Why did he work at passing an electric current through certain solutions? 4) Was Faradays's work useful only for chemistry or for any other inventions? 29. 06bSlcHTe, nO)l(anyi1cTa: 1) "He gathered together all the work of the scientists..." 2) "He called these effects the laws of electrolysis." 3) Morse, Bell, and Edison were able to make their inventions 30. AMCKYCCMSI: 1) "Faraday puts electricity to work." 2) Inventions are very closely connected (or interact). Unit 9 mE 
{' . "- \ Christopher Columbus Christopher became a sailor when he was fourteen. He was tall, and his shoulders were broad But Christopher did not intend to stay a common seaman. He asked questions. He learned how to steer a ship by the stars, how to make maps, and how to chart a ship's voyage through strange waters. He was made the second mate to the captain, then the first mate, then captain in his own right. He did not sail to India, but he sailed to all the different lands that bordered the Mediterra- nean Sea - Europe, Africa, Western Asia. He had bloody fights with pirates. When he was twenty-four or so, he commanded a battle- ship for the city of Genoa in a war against her rival city Venice. He went on voyages of exploration - South along the coast of Africa; North along the coast of Europe. Some men make fortunes at sea. Others lose them. In a terrible storm off the coast of Portugal, Christopher's ship sank to the bottom, and Christopher lost everything he owned. He did not even have money to get home. He soon found work as a map maker in a bookshop in the Portuguese city of Lisbon. Scholars came to the bookshop, and teachers and travellers. Chris- topher was a grown man now, but he still asked questions, and he still learned. Always before he had asked question about the East. Now he began asking about the West. To the west lay the Great Sea of Darkness. Beyond that- nothing. The world stopped like the end of a plank, and if you went too far you would fall off. At least that's what most people said. But some learned men said no. The earth is not flat like a plank. It is round like a ball. If you sail far enough to the west, you will reach the east - India. But how far? No one knew. Some people tried to guess. An Italian doctor named Toscanelli even drew a map. Here was the Sea of Darkness. On one side of it. were Spain and Portugal and the islands off the African coast. On the I .,..--- --""'i'\ ... ( -' I. I l  ..; t .' ., '\ """ \. . 4 -. , " . \: ...-, '\I- l ' f!"oI -. '-f"T ' -". <_. ---'" ':.. WORDLIST against ['gc nst] - npOTVlB battleship ['bretIJip] - nVlHeHbl Kopa6nb beyond [bi'jnd] - 3a, no TY CTOPOHY border ['b:d] - rpaHtt1YIt1Tb bottom ['btm] - AHO broad [br:d] - Wlt1pOKVI captain ['kreptin] - KanViTaH chart [tf Qt]- HaHOCVlTb Ha KapTY coast [kust] - n06epe>Kbe command [k'mQ:nd] - KOMaHAOBaTb common ['kmn] - npocTo, 06bIKHoBeHHbl different ['difr()nt]- pa3nVlYHbl exploration Lekspl'reif( J )n] - VlccneAOBaHVle fall off [f:]] - nClAaTb fight [fait] - Cpa>KeHtt1e flat [flret] - nnOCKVI Genoa ['ct)en{u)] - reHYs:J grown [grun] - 83pOCJ1bli1 India ['indjJ] - tt1HAIt1s:J intend [in'tend] - HaMepeBaTbCs:J island ['ailnd] - OCTpOB Italian ri'treljn] -It1TaJlbs:JHelt land [lrend] - 3eMns:J Lisbon ['lizbn] -nVlcca60H  Unit 9 lose a fortune ['f:tf(  )n] - pa30pVlTbCs:J make a fortune - pa360raTeTb mate [meit]- nOMOLllHVlK own [U n] - Bn8)J.eTb pirate ['pairt] - nVipaT plank [plreJ)k] - AOCKa Portugal ['p:tug( )I] - nOPTYraJIVls:J reach [ri:tf]- AOCTVlraTb rival [raiv(  )1]- conepHVlYalOLllVl sail [seil] - nnblTb sailor ['seil] - MOps:JK seaman ['si:mn] - MaTpoc shoulder [,fuld] - nneyo sink [sil)k] (sank, sunk) - TOHYTb steer [sti] - seCTVI CYAHO storm [st:m] - 6yps:J, rp03a strange [streinct)] - He3HaKoMbl terrible ['terJbl] - cTpawHbli1 the Mediterranean Sea [.meditJ'reinjJn 'si:] -Cpe- AVl3eMHoe Mope traveller [Itrrev(  )1;)] - nYTewecTBeHHVlK Venice ['venis] - BeHeLlVls:J voyage [vi ict)] - nYTeweCTBVle 
other side of the Sea was India. It had to be, if the world was round. Most people laughed at Toscanelli; but Christopher Columbus believed him. What's more, Christopher believed that he himself was the man to prove that the earth was ro- und. He believed that God had chosen him for that work. But where would he get the money to pay for such a venture? He needed ships, men, supplies and goods to trade with the people of India. Columbus never doubted that he would succeed. He had no money, but he did have faith. If he could only find someone with both money and faith! He asked King John of Portugal. No. He asked King Ferdinand of Spain. Ferdinand needed his money to fight a war. But Queen Isabella of Spain saw the faith in Columbus's eyes. She said, UAsk us again when the war is over. n King Ferdinand was winning his war. So once more Columbus laid his plans before the Spanish King. Ferdinand still said, "No." Then ragged, penniless, but still rich in faith, Columbus set out to walk to France. Perhaps the French King had both faith and money. But Columbus did not walk far. Royal messengers on swift horses overtook him and brought him back. Queen Isabella had been talking to Ferdinand, and so Columbus would have his ships! Three ships. The Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. Columbus set sail from Palos, Spain, on August 3, 1492. He sailed out of the well-known Mediterranean into the strange and terrifying Sea of Darkness. He passed the Canary Islands, the last known bit of land. The map said there should soon be many islands. Columbus saw not one - only water, vast, unending water. The sailors grew frightened. The map was wrong about the islands. Was it wrong about the earth's being round? "Turn back!" they begged Columbus. Columbus said, uSail on." uTurn back," begged the sailors. uWe must turn back." (/ '\1........,,<3_-.r'1)  .-. '- )t.., '"- Br1: 4)) I* . .1'"1:' _. ', .1 - -' . P \ \ .......- ' rlr Ir.r r , - ".  ... ' --- ....  :.  . --..-.. ,,--. .... -- .-.....--...-........- -............  =:;,.. -.. -=.--- '....__:- -  --- - -- WORDLIST beg [beg]- npOCTb, YMO/lTb bit [bit] - KJlO'"lOK Canary Islands [k'n£ri 'aiJdndz] - KaHapcKVle oc- TpOBa doubt [daut] - COMHeBaTbC51 faith [fei e] - sepa frightened ['fraitnd] - cnyraHHbli1 God [g::>d] - 60r goods [gudz] - Tosapbl laugh [la:f] - CMeTbC lay plans - 3J1araTb nJ1aHbl messenger ['mcsinctd] -nOCblJ1bHbI overtake (.dl1Vd'teik] (overtook, overtaken)-AoroHSITb Palos [pa:lsJ - r. na/loc penniless ['penilis] - 6e3 AeHer prove [pru:v] - AOKa3blsaTb ragged ['rregid] -oAeTbli1 B /lOXMOTb rich [ri tfJ - 60raTbli1 set out - OTnpaSJ1SJTbcSJ Spain [spein] - V1cnaHVlSJ succeed [sk'si:d] - MeTb ycnex supply [s'plail- 3anac swift [swiftl-6blcTpbl trade [treid] - ToprOBaTb unending [An'endil)] - 6ecKoHe'"lHbli1 vast [va:st] - 06WVlpHbli1, rpoMaAHbl venture ['ventf] - HaYVlHaHe win [win] (won; won) - BblVirpaTb Unit.9 
II.. .. - . om "We must sail on," Columbus said. They sailed. Columbus offered gold and rich gifts to the first man who would sight land. The sailors climbed to the top of the rigging and looked, looked and looked. One day a sailor called, "Land! Land, ho!" But it was only a cloud. At last they began to see a few birds and drifting weeds. One day the waves carried the branch of a wild rose bush! That night Columbus stood alone on deck. The men were all below, sleep- ing so that they would be ready to look for land when the moon came up. Suddenly far ahead Columbus saw a light. He shouted out the news. They all peered into the darkness. When at last the moon rose, they all saw it. Land! Land! In the early sunlight the men saw an island. The gateway to India, they thought, not knowing that it was a gateway to a whole new world. The sailors who had begged Columbus to turn back now called him their hero. They said that this date would be the greatest in history - October the twelfth, fourteen hundred and ninety-two. Questions: 1 ) What explorers do you know? 2) What do you know about Columbus? 3) What was the fate of Columbus? 4) What Russian (English) explorers do you know? 5) What Polar explorers do you know? 6) What Russian Polar explorers do you know? 7) What was the fate of Sedov? 8) Where did the expedition headed by O. Schmidt go? 9) What do you know of Papanin's expedition? 31 . Choose the right answer: 1) What was Columbus when he was fourteen? a) a worker b) a scientist c) a sailor 2) What was Columbus interested in? a) He wrote music. b) He intended to stay a common seaman. c) He learned how to steer a ship by the stars, how to make maps, and how to chart a ship's- voyage though strange waters. 3) Who gave the money to pay for Columbus's venture? a) The French King b) King Ferdinand of Spain c) King John of Portugal 4) When did Columbus open a gateway to a new world? a) in 1317 b) in 1565 c) in 1492 1 c; 2c; 3b; 4c. WORDLIST ahead ['hed] - BnepeAIt1 below [bi'ldu] - BHiI13Y branch [bra:ntf] - BeTKa bush [bun - KYCT carry ['kreri] - npVlHocVlTb climb [klaim] - nOAHIt1MaTbC deck [dek]-nany6a drifting ['driftilJ] - n11bIByw.lt1 no TelfeHIt1IO, Apell1 gateway rgeitwei] - BopOTa gift [gift] - nOAapOK gold [gJuld] - 30110TO 248 Unit .9 hero ['hir;}u] - repoi1 light [Jait] - ceeT offer ['Jf;} J - npeAllaraTb peer [pi] - BCMaTpIt1BaTbC rise [raiz] (rose; risen) - BCTaBaTb sight [sait] - 3aMelfaTb suddenly ['sAdnli] - BAPyr, BHe3anHO wave [weiv] - BOJ1Ha weed [wi:d] - copHa TpaBa wild [waild] - AiI1KVli1 
r r . < - "\' ... \,. "'\ '1. I' Explorer Heyerdahl hunts for lost civilization in Peru. Oslo. Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl, famous for his daring Kon Tiki expedition, says he faces the most exciting project of his life in a hunt for clues to a lost civilization which lies buried in a Peruvian city of pyramids. Archaeologists working in North-Western Peru found that 26 mounds, previously thought to be natural features of the landscape, were pyramids hidden by the ravages of time. The ancint city is called Tucume. --nrhis is the most exciting project:1 have ever been involved in," Heyerdahl, 73: told the "Aftenposten Daily" in an interview. He will lead excavation work there next spring. in cooperation with Peruvian archaeologists. "The whole town is probably intact underneath... it has never been plundered by grave robbers." Heyerdahl has devoted much of his life to rewriting the his- " tory books on the peoples of the southern hemisphere, claim- ing that they were much more civilized than previously thought and that their culture was spread through sea travel. - -I n 1947, he crossed the Pacific on the balsa wood raft Kon Tiki to prove that ancient South American peoples could have travelled to the Pacific islands and populated them. "A culture which is far older than that of the first Egyptian pharaoh must have been the basis for the spread of civilization," Heyerdahl said. "I hope Tucume will be able to put us on the trail of that lost culture." Local Indian legends tell that Tucume. spread over a vast area of 220 hect- ares, was founded by descendants of a king who brought his people to the Peruvian coast on balsa rafts. The pyramids are between 30 and 40 metres (97 and 130 feet) high. Knut Haugland. director of the Kon Tiki museum which houses the famous raft in Oslo, told Reuters the museum would be working with Heyerdahl on the project. WORDLIST ancient ['einf(d)nt] - ApeBHVI£1 archaeologist La:ki'JIJctist] - apxe0J10r balsa rbJ:I s;) ] - 6aflb30Bbli1 claim [kleim] -3A. 3aBfl5Hb clue [kl u:] - KllIOY daring rd£driIJj - cMenbl descendant [di'senddnt] - nOTOMOK Egyptian [i'cti pf( d)n] - erVineTCKVI£1 exciting [ik'saitiIJ] - BOJ1HYIOU\Vli1, 3axsaTbIBalOU\Vli1 explorer [iks'ptxrd] - VlCCJ1eAOBaTenb feature ['fi:ij d] - YepTa grave [greiv] - MorVina hemisphere ['hemi,sfig] - nOJ1ywapVle hunt [hAnt] -3A. nOViCK intact [in'trekt] - HenOBpe)KAeHHbli1, HespeAVIMbli1 involve [in'v:>lv] -3A. npHVlMaTb yyaCT&t1e landscape ['lrenskeip] - flaHAwacpT lead excavation [li:d ,cksk:J'veif( )n] work - npoBo- AVlTb pacKonKVI local ['IJukgl] - MecTHbli1 lost civilization [.sivilai'zeif( J )n] - nOTepHHa (3a- 6bITa) I..\VlBn13aUJ1 mound [maund] - HaCblnb, KYpraH Norwegian [nJ:'wi:ct( )n] - HOpBe>KCKVli1 Oslo rJslgu] - Ocno Peru [pd'ru:] - nepy Peruvian [p'ru:vjn] - nepyaHcKVli1 pharaoh rfer:Ju] - cpapaoH plunder ['plAnd] - rpa6V1Tb populate ('pJpjuleit] - HaceflTb previously ['pri:vjdsli 1- npe>K.Qe probably ['prbdbli] - BepOTHO project [prJ'ct5ekt] - npoeKT, nf1aH prove [pru:v] - AOKa3aTb pyramid ['pir:JmidJ - n1paMAa raft [ra:ft] - nnOT ravage ['rrevict1 of time - pa3pywVlTenbHoe Aei1cT- Be BpeMeHVI robber ['rJhg] - rpa6V1Tef1b spread [sp red 1 - pacnpocTpaHsnbc Thor Heyerdahl ['heig'da:l] - Typ Xei1epAaJl, HopBe)t(- CKi1 nYTewecTBeHHK, 3THorpacp, apxeonor underneath [/\nd:J'ni:8] - BH3Y vast [va: st] - 06WVlpHbli1 It" 249 
UArchaeologists started digging around one of the pyramids in 1986. They found gold masks among other things, but we've only scratched the surface," he said. uNone of the other pyramids have been opened. We don't know exactly how old they are, but there must have been thousands of people living in that area. The finds there will be of the greatest archaeological significance." Heyerdahl" who now lives in Italy and is currently working in Egypt, said the Tucume project would probably take several decades to complete. He was invited to take part while on a visit to Peru in 1986. Althougttlong past normal retirement age, Heyerdahl has pursued his career of ethnolo- gy - the science of racial origins and charac- teristics - with vigour for many decades. His book on Kon Tiki has sold more than 20 million copies, and two years ago he visited Easter Island to try to find out more about its huge and myste- rious stone statues. In 1970, he succeeded in sailing a replica of an Egyptian vessel, called Ra Two, from Morocco to Barbados in an attempt to prove that the ancient Egyp- tians could have reached the western hemisphere centuries before Christo- pher Columbus in 1492. 1 '"" \0 I \ '" \ 1 t. n , '\ ',Hj \ '-.. ")0 ,.... .. ,...._t' - - .- ___ ......0:2:"_ ... '""  . <. - - ---.. - - '-'- What is an astronaut? The word comes from the Greek, astron, meaning Ustar" and nautes, meaning "sailor." Astronauts are the men and women who pilot, navigate and fly in spacecraft. Russian Ustar-sailors" are called cosmonauts, cosmos being the Greek for uuniverse." The first space flight was made in 1961 by the Rus- sian Yuri Gagarin. It lasted for 108 minutes. Russia was the first country in the world to accomplish a manned space flight. The first woman in space was also Russian, Valentina Tereshkova. In 1963, her flight lasted almost 3 days. And the first "space walk" was made by anoth- er Russian, Aleksey Leonov, in 1965, though he was still tethered by a line to WORDLIST accomplish ['kmplin -ocyLlteCTBnTb, BblnOll- HTb astronaut ['restr;)n:t] - aCTpOHaBT, KOCMOHaBT command module Columbia [k'ma: nd 'mJdju:l k']Ambi] - KOMaHAa KOCMVlyeCKOrO Kopa611 "KonYM6V1" currently rkArntli] - B TeKyLltVli1 MOMeHT dig [dig] (dug, dug) - KonaTb equally.['i:kwli] - B paBHoi1 CTeneH ethnology [ee'nJl<ti] - 3TH0J10rVl giant ['<taint] - rViraHT, BenViKaH Greek [gri:k] - rpeYeCKVI huge ['hju:cB] - orpoMHbl lift off [lift] - cTapToBaTb (0 KOCMVlyeCKOM Kopa611e) line [lain] - J1V1Hl1, 3A. TpOC . lunar module Eagle l'lu:n 'mJdju:I'i:gl] - J1YHHbI oTceK(Ka6V1Ha)Oplla fIm Unit 9 mask [ma:sk] - MaCKa mysterious lmi'stiJris] -TaHcTBeHHbli1 navigate ('nc.evigeit] -ynpaBllTb pursue [pd'SjU:] - ClleAOBaTb rejoin [ri'ctJin] - npVlcoeAVlHTbC replica ['replik] - MOAellb scratch [skrreij] - KonaTb Herlly6oKo spacecraft ['speiskra:ft] - KOCMVlYeCKi1 Kopa6nb statue ['stretju:] - cTaTY surface ['s:fis] - nOBepxHocTb tether ['teOJ] - npVlB3blBaTb touch down ['tAU daun] -3A. onycTlt1TbC universe ['ju:niv:s] - BcelleHHa Valentina T ereshkova - BaneHTVlHa T epeWKOBa vessel [vesl] - CYAHO vigour ['vig] - cVllla. 3Heprlt1 Yuri Gagarin - IOpVli1 rarapVlH 
his spacecraft. It was nineteen years later, in 1984, that the American Bruce McCandiess made the firstl independent excursion in space. The oldest of all the space travellers so far is the American Karl Henize, who was fifty-eight during his flight in 1985. f I..... ,-,  ,  . . .. .... t . II; a. s, . "'- .. .. t_ , " " .. '\.. ...... :) '", ,," ..: '. }'I, . .. .... . ,  . . T , . , :... I ., 0' ... ,,'1 , .. I .. -- -... , - . . .. . ... 1J. \.' ., ..  --",- ........ w' .. -. --- , .;. ..... .. .... ..... \,... Who was the first man to stand on the Moon? April 12, 1961, is one of the most important dates in the history of mankind. On that day, the first manned space flight took place. Only eight years laterl a man set foot on the Moon for the first time. At 2:56 on July 21, 1969, Neil Arm- strong spoke words that have gone down in history: "One small step for a man, one giant step for mankind". ' Equally famous are the words he spoke 6.5 hours earlier on July 20, 1969, when the lunar module Eagle first touched down: liThe Eagle has landed." The astronauts stay on the Moon lasted for 21.5 hours before their module lifted off to rejoin the orbiting command module Columbia. WORDLIST Aleksey Leonov - AlleKce IleoHoB Bruce McCandiess ['bru:s l11'krendiz] - 6plOc MaK K3HAVIC date [deit] -AaTa' earlier ['d:lid] - paHee equally ['i:kwJli] - B paBHo CTeneHVI flight [flait] - nOlleT giant ['ctaiJnt] - rViraHTcKi:1 history ['hist( d )ri] - VlCTOpVl Karl Henize ['ka:l'heniz] - Kapn XeHVl3 later ['leitd] - n03>Ke ' lunar ['lu:nd J - llYHHbli1 mankind Lmn'kaind] - 4enOBe4eCTBO manned [mrend] - ynpaBneMbl, nVlnoTVlpyeMbl (4enoseKoM) module ['m:Jdju:l] - MOAYllb Moon [mu:n] -IlYHa Neil Armstrong ('ni:l'a: mstrIJ] - Hei:1n ApMcrpoHr set foot - crynLt1Tb Horo space [speis] - KOCMOC step [step] - war take place - npoVlcxoAVlTb EmDmI 
F . The' great poet Editor "Did you write this poem yourself?" Young man "Yes, every line of it." Editor "Then I am glad to meet you, Mr. Byron. I thought you were dead long ago." Candid criticism Author "Don't you find my book a little tiresome?" Friend "Not at all, I find it perfectly tiresome." 'No intrusion A talkative author, after speaking some time about his piece to Richard B. Sheridan, said, "Sir, L fear I have been intruding on your attention." "Not at all, I assure you," he replied, "I was thinking of something else." That explains it Mrs. Greene: "Why do you advise Miss Johnson to go abroad to study music? You know she has no talent." Mr. White: "Well, I know, but you see, she lives next door to me." .. Still worse Johnson: "It must be awful for an opera singer to realize that he can never sing again." Jackson: "Yes, but it is much more awful if he doesn't realize it." Not to be taught Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was asked by a young man how the latter could learn to compose. "I can't tell you that," was the composer's answer. "Well, but you yourself were composing before you were five." "That's right. But I asked nobody to do it." The power of his voice The famous Italian singer Enrico Caruso (1873-1921) was asked by a less famous but very vain colleague: "Did you notice how my voice filled the hall last night?" "Yes, I did," replied the great but modest man, "I even saw a great part of the audience leave to make room for it." WORDLIST assure [g,!Ug] -YBepSHb awful [':ful] - Y>KaCHbl candid criticism ['krendid 'kritisizm] - VlCKpeHHSI KpJ..1TVlKa colleague ['kli:g] - Konnera compose [kgm'pguzj - COLfIl1HSlTb fear [fi g ] - 60SlTbCSI go abroad [g'br:d] - noexaTb 3a rpaHVIY intrude [in'tru:d] - 3noynoTpe6V1Tb intrusion [in'tru:3( g)n 1- nocraTenbCTBO line [lain] - CTpOKa fm Unit 9 make room for - oCBo6oAVlTb MeCTO modest ['mJdist] - CKpOMHbl perfectly ['pd:fiktli] - cosepweHHO piece [pi:s] - 3A. np0ll13BeAeHJ..1e power ['paud] - CJ..1na realize ['riglaiz] - nOHVlMaTb talkative rtJ:kgtiv] - pa3roBopLfVlBbl the latter ['lretg] - nocneAHVI (1113 ASYX ynoMSlHyTblX) tiresome ['tai sdm] - yTOMVlTenbHbli1 vain [vein] -Tw.ecnasHbl£1 worse [Wg:s] - xy>Ke 
The Power of Friendship Once upon a time there were three friends: a stag, a tortoise and a bird. One night the stag got caught in a net set by a hunter. At first he tried to get free by his own efforts, but he soon realized that neither his antlers nor his hoofs could tear a hole in the net and he called to his friend the tortoise for help. The tortoise came up and immediately began to gnaw through the strands one by one. But while' the tortoise toiled away, the day began to dawn. The hunter who had set the trap got up, took his bow and arrows and set out for the forest. ,II/. "   .;". . e. Sh -"/r- ,.  ,{(:.; ,. r t' . .i" '- . I .."fi"  \.(v :.((1;. , . WORDLIST antler ['rentl] - OJleHit1V1 por arrow ['reru] - CTpella be about ['baut] - c06V1paTbc beak [bi:k] - KllIOB bow [bdU] - llYK distract [dis't reekt] - OTBlleKaTb; C6Lt1BaTb c TOllKY free [f ri:] - oCB060AVlTb gnaw [n:] - rpbl3Tb hardly ['ha:dli] had he entered ['entdd] the forest- eABa BOWeJ1 OH B Jlec homeward ['hdumwdd] -AOMOVl, KAOMY hoof [hu:f] - KonbiTO neither ... nor ['naiad] - Hi-1 ... Hit1 net [net] - ceTb once upon a time - OAHa>K.Qbl peck [pek] (at) - KlleBaTb, AOIl6V1Tb KllIOBOM Hardly had he entered the forest, when he was observed by the stag's other friend, the bird. To distract the hunter, the bird began flying above his head as though it were woun- ded. The hunter went after it, while the tor- toise freed the stag. When the hunter finally reached the net he found it gnawed through and empty. In his anger he seized his bow, took up an arrow and aimed at the bird. As he was about to shoot, the tortoise bit his toe. The hunter cried out missing his target, and the bird flew away. The hunter then seized the tortoise, thrust it into his pouch and set off homeward. On the way, he grew hungry. Sitting down in the shade of a tree; he started to eat his meal of rice cakes. As he sat there, the stag ap- proached him from behind, gently lifted the pouch on to his antlers and sped away into the forest. There the bird was waiting for him. It pierced the pouch with its beak and went pecking at it until it had pecked it to pieces and freed the tortoise. pierce ['pigs] - npOTblKaTb, npOKaJlblBaTb pouch [pauUl-cYMKa, MeWOyeK rice [rais] - pVlC seize [si:z] - CXBaTVlTb shade [feid] -TeHb stag [steeg] - OlleHb strand [strrend] - HTb target ['ta:git] - u,eJlb tear [t£ d ] - pBaTb the day began to dawn - HayaJlO CBeTaTb thrust [8rAst] - 3aCOBbiBaTb toe [tdU] - naJ1eu, Ha Hore toil [t  it] - TPY AVlTbC tortoise [lt:tdS] -yepenaxa trap [treep]- JlOBywKa Unit 9 Em 
The Last Leaf By O. Henry Sue and Johnsy lived at the top of a building with three floors. One of these young women came from Maine; the other from California. They had met at a restaurant on Eighth Street. There they discovered that they liked the same kind of art, the same kind of food, and the same kind of clothes. So they decid- ed to live and work together. , That was in the spring. Toward winter a cold stranger entered Greenwich Village. No one could see him. He walked around touching one person here and another there with his icy fingers. He was a bad sickness. Doctors called him Pneumonia. On the east side of the city he hurried, touching many people; but in the narrow streets of Greenwich Village he did not move so quickly. Mr. Pneumonia was not a nice old gentleman. A nice old gentleman would not hurt a weak little woman from California. But Mr. Pneumonia touched Johnsy with his cold fingers. She lay on her bed almost without moving, and she looked through the window at the wall of the house next to hers. One morning the busy doctor spoke to Sue alone in the hall, where Johnsy could not hear. "She has a very small chance," he said. "She has a chance, if she wants to live. If people don't want to live, I can't do much for them . Your little lady has decided that she is not going to get well. Is there something that is troubling her?" "She always wanted to go to Italy and paint a picture of the Bay of Naples," said Sue. "Paint! Not paint. Is there anything worth being troubled about? A man?" "A man?" said Sue. "Is a man worth - No, doctor. There is not a man." "It is weakness," said the doctor. "I will db all I can do. But when a sick person begins to feel that he's going to die, half my work is useless. Talk to her about new winter clothes. If she were interested in the future, her chances would be better." After the doctor had gone, Sue went into the workroom to cry. Then she walked into Johnsy's room. She carried some of her painting materials, and she was singing. Johnsy lay there, very thin and very quiet. Her face was turned toward the window. Sue stopped singing, thinking that Johnsy was asleep. Sue began to work. As she worked she heard a low sound, again and again. She went quickly to the bedside. WORD LIST Bay of Naples [bei av 'neiplz] - HeanOJ1TaHCKVI 3aJlVlB bedside ['bedsaid] - nOCTeJ1b California Lkreli'f:>:nJa] - KanVlQ:>opH (wTaT B CWA) chance [tfa:ns] - waHC die [dai] -YMVlpaTb discover [dis'kAVJ] -06Hapy)KTb get well- BbI3AOpaBJ1V1BaTb, nOnpaBJ1TbC Greenwich Village [grinid3 'vilict51 - paoH HblO- opKa, rAe )f(BYT XYAO)f(HVlKiI1 VI nViCaTeJ1V1 hurry ['hAri] - cneWTb, ToponTbc hurt r ha:t] (hurt; hurt) - npVlHTb 60J1b icy ['aisi] - JleA5)Hoi1 Em mBI Is there anything worth being troubled about? - Cy- w.ecTByeT JlVl TO-TO, Vl3-3a ero CTOVIT 6ecnoKoTbC? ' Joh nsy [' cB n s i] - A>t<OHC1-1 Maine [mein] - M3H (wTaT B CWA) Pneumonia [nju:'mdunjd] - nHeBMOH (Bocnane- HVie JlerKVlx) sick [sik] - 6011bH0i1 . sickness ['siknis] - 60J1e3Hb stranger ['st re i n ct5a] - He3HaKOMeLl, aK Sue [sju] - CblO toward [tJ'w:d] - 6J1V1)f(e K useless ['ju:slis] - 6eCnOJle3HO 
Johnsy's eyes were open wide. She was looking out the window and count- ing - counting back. "Twelve," she said; and a little later, "Eleven"; and then, "Ten," and, "Nine"; and then, "Eight," and, "Seven," almost together. Sue looked out the window. What was there to count? There was only the side wall of the next house, a short distance away. The wall had no windows. An old, old tree grew against the wall. The cold breath of winter had already touched it. Almost all its leaves had fallen from its dark branches. "What is it, dear?" asked Sue. "Six," said Johnsy, in a voice still lower. "They're falling faster now. Thr days ago there were almost a hundred. It hurt my head to count them. But now it's easy. There goes another one. There are only five now." "Five what, dear? Tell your Sue." "Leaves. On the tree. When the last one falls, I must go, too. I've known that for three days. Didn't the doctor tell you?" "Gh, I never heard of such a thing," said Sue. "It doesn't have any sense in it. What does an old tree have to do with you? Or with your getting well? And you used to love that tree so much. Don't be a little fool. The doctor told me your chances for gettiAg well. He told me this morning. He said you had very good chances! Try to eat a little now. And then I'll go back to work. And then I can sell my picture, and then I can buy something more for you to eat to make you strong." . "You don't have to buy anything for me," said Johnsy. She still looked out the window. "There goes another. No, I don't want anything to eat. Now there are four. I want to see the last one fall before night. Then I'll go, too." "Johnsy, dear," said Sue, "will you promise me to close your eyes and keep them closed? Will you promise not to look out the window until I finish \/vorking? I must have this picture ready tomorrow. I need the light; I can't cover the window." "Couldn't you work in the other room?" asked Johnsy coldly. ')  ..., L "I'd rather be here by you," said Sue. "And I don't want you to look aUh_oseeaves." "Tell me as soon as you have finished," said Johnsy. She closed her eyes and lay white and still. "Because I want to see the last leaf fall. I have done enough waiting. I have done enough thinking. I want to go sailing down, down, like one of those leaves." "Try to sleep," said Sue. "I must call Behr- man to come up here. I want to paint a man in this picture, and I'll make him look like Behr- man. I won't be gone a minute. Don't try to move till I come back." Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the first floor of their house. He was past six- , , r \ \ \ \ $ ".. ............ ,," I 'J.;-./&f , (f ,. f s  { -, WORDLIST Behrman [b:mJn] - 6epMaH breath [bre8] - AbIXaHlt1e, AYHoBeHVle branch [bra: nif] - BeTBb distance ['distgns] - paCCTOs:1Hlt1e fall [fJ:I] (fell, fallen) - na,QaTb sail [seil] - nJ1b1Tb success [sk'ses] - ycnex until [An'til] - AO Tex nap nOKa Unit 9 fm 
ty. He had had no success as a painter. For forty years he had painted, without ever painting a good picture. He had always talked of painting a great picture, a masterpiece, but he had never yet started it. He got a little money by letting others paint pictures of him. He drank too much. He still talked of his great masterpiece. And he believed that it was his special duty to do everything possible to help Sue and Johnsy. Sue found him in his dark room, and she knew that he had been drinking. She could smell it. She told him about Johnsy and the leaves on the vine. She said that she was afraid that Johnsy would indeed sail down, down like the leaf. Her hold on the world was growing weaker. Old Behrman shouted his anger over such an idea. "What!" he cried. "Are there such fools? Do people die because leaves drop off a tree? I have not heard of such a thing. No, I will not come up and sit while you make a picture of me. Why do you allow her to think such a thing? That poor little Johnsy!" "She is very sick and weak," said Sue. "The sickness has put these strange ideas into her mind. Mr. Behrman, if you won't come, you won't. But I don't think you're very nice." "This is like a woman!" shouted Behrman. "Who said I will not come? Go. I come with you. For half an hour I have been trying to say that I will come. God! This is not any place for someone so good as Johnsy to lie sick. Some day I shall paint my masterpiece, and we shall all go away from here. God! Yes." Johnsy was sleeping when they went up. Sue covered the window, and took Behrman into the other room. There they fearfully looked out the window at the tree. Then they looked at each other for a moment without speaking. A cold rain was falling, with a little snow in it too. Behrman sat down, and Sue began to paint. She worked through most of the night. In the morning, after an hour's sleep, she went to Johnsy's bedside. John- sy with wide-open eyes was looking toward the window. "I want to see," she told Sue. Sue took the cover from the window. But after the beating rain and the wild wind that had not stopped through the whole night, there still was one leaf to be seen against the wall. It was the last on the tree. It was still dark green near the branch. But at the edges it was turning yellow with age. There it was hanging from a branch nearly twenty feet above the ground. "It is the last one," said Johnsy. "I thought it would surely fall during the night. I heard the wind. It will fall today, and I shall die at the same time." "Dear, dear Johnsy!" said Sue. "Think of me, if you won't think of yourself. What would I do?" '. But Johnsy did not answer. The most lonely thing in the world is a soul when it is preparing to go on its far journey. The ties that held her to friendship and to earth were breaking, one by one. WORDLIST anger ['reI)g] - rHeB at the edges - no Kpa5JM beat [bi:t] (beat, beaten) - YAap5JTb far journey ['cB:ni] - 3A. AaIlbHVli1 nyrb fearfully ['figfuli] - 8 CTpaxe hang [hreI)] (hung, hung) - BceTb lonely ['lunli] - OAVlHOKVli1 masterpiece ['mQ:stpi:s] - weAeBp prepare [prelp£] - 3A. rOTOBVlTbC5J smell [smel] - YYBcTBoBaTb 3anax soul [sul] - Aywa ties [taiz] - Y3bl vine [vain] - noaa, non3yyee paCTeHe p Em Unit 9 
The day slowly passed. As it grew dark, they could still see the leaf hanging from its branch against the wall. And then, as the night came, the north wind began to blow again. The rain still beat against the windows. When it was light enough the next morning, Johnsy again commanded that she be allowed to see. The leaf was' still there. Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she called to Sue, who was cooking something for her to eat. "I've been a bad girl, Sue," said Johnsy. "Something has made that last leaf stay there to show me how bad I was. It is wrong to want to die. I'll try to eat now. But first bring me a looking-glass, so that I can see myself. And then I'll sit up and watch you cook." An hour later she said, "Sue, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples." The doctor came in the afternoon. Sue followed him into the hall outside Johnsy's room to talk to him. . "The chances are good," said the doctor. He took Sue's thin, shaking hand in his. "Give her good care, and she'll get well. And now I must see another sick person in this house. His name is Behrman. A painter, I believe. Pneumo- nia, too. He is an old, weak man, and he is very ill. There is no hope for him. But we take him to the hospital today. We'll make it as easy for him as we can." The next day the doctor said to Sue: "She's safe. You have done it. Food and care now - that's aiL" And that afternoon Sue came to the bed where Johnsy lay. She put one arm around her. "I have something to tell you," she said. "Mr. Behrman died of pneumonia today in the hospital. He was ill only two days. Someone found him on the morning of the first day, in his room. He was helpless with pain. "His shoes and his clothes were wet and as cold as ice. Everyone wondered where he had been. The night had been so cold. "And then they found some things. There was a light that he had taken outside. And there were his materials for painting. There was paint, green paint and yellow paint. "Look out the window, dear, at the last leaf on the wall. Didn't you wonder why it never moved when the wind was blowing? Oh, my dear, it is Behrman's great masterpiece - he painted it there the night that the last leaf fell." WORDLIST allow ['lau] - n03B0J1SHb be safe [seifj - 6blTb BHe onaCHOCT command [k'ma:nd] - npKa3b1BaTb looking-glass ['lukil)gla:s] - 3epKaJlO move [m u:v] - ABraTbCSI wonder ['wAnd] - HTepecoBaTbcSI 9 KHHra AJ1Jt 4TeHHJt K Y4e6HHKY .C4acTn. aHrn.-2. .8 fm 
Aopor1'1e APY3b! Mbl npeAllaraeM BaM n03HaKOM1'1TbC C npeKpaCHblM1'1 CT1'1XaM1'1 aHrll1'1CK1'1X 1'1 aMe- p1'1KaHCK1'1X aBTOpOB. BbIYLf1'1Te Ha3YCTb Te 3 HX, KOTOpble BaM nOHpaBTC. HaM 6YAeT OlfeHb npTHO, eCJ1 Bbl no- nblTaeTeCb nepeBeCT X Ha PYCCK 3b1K B CTXOTBOpHO 4>opMe. )l(ellaeM YAaLf! 
Mary Britton Miller Cats Cats sleep Anywhere, Any table, Any chair, Top of piano, Window-edge, In the middle, On the edge, Open drawer, Empty shoe, Anybody's Lap will do, Fitted in a Cardboard box, In the cupboard With your frocks - Anywhere! They don't care! Cats sleep Anywhere. WORDLIST air [£] - B03AYX anywhere reniw£] - Be3Ae arch [a:tf] - 3rVl6aTb{cSl) (Ayro) back [brek] - cnVlHa cardboard box rka:db:d bks] - KapTOHHaSl KO- p06Ka care [k£] - OCTOpO)l(HOCTb claw [k13:) - KorOTb delicate rdelikit] - 3A. TOHKVI drawer [dr3:] - BblAB)I(HO SlL1lK empty eempti] - nycTo fit (in) [fit] - 3A. npVlCTpaBaTbCSl frock [fr3k] - nllaTbe high [hai] - BbiCOKO jaw [Q)3:] - lieJ1IOCTb, 3A. pOT lap [lrep] - KOlleHVI lift [lift] - nOAHi1MaTb(C) ... (  -..:-.-  " ' I, .. Cat The black cat yawns, Opens her jaws, Stretches her legs, And shows her claws. Then she gets up And stands on four Long stiff legs And yawns some more. She shows her sharp teeth, She stretches her lip, Her slice of a tongue Turns up at the tip. Lifting herself On her delicate toes, She arches her back As high as it goes. She lets herself down With particular care, And pads away With her tail in the air. . lip ['lip] - ry6a pad away - 3A. YXOATb particular [p'tikjul] - oc06b1 piano ['pjrenu] - naHHO sharp If a: p] - OCTpbl slice [slais] - KOHYK stiff [stif] - 3A. BblnpSlMJ1eHHbI stretch (stretf] - BblTSlrHBaTb tail [te it] - XBOCT They don't care [k£]. - M Bce paBHO. tip [ti p] - KOHYVlK toe [tu] - 3A. KorOTOK tongue ['tAI)] - 3b1K top [t3p] - Bepx turn up rt:n lAp] - nOSlBTbC window-edge rwindu'e<t] - Kpa OKHa yawn U:n] - 3eBaTb Poems mJ 
Sarah Josepha Hale (1788-1879) Mary's Lamb Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow; And everywhere that Mary went, The lamb was sure to go. He followed her to school one day, Which was against the rule; It made the children laugh and play To see a lamb at school. And so the teacher turned him out, But still he lingered near, And waited patiently about Till Mary did appear. Then he ran to her, and laid His head upon her arm, As if he said, "I'm not afraid - You'll keep me from all harm." "What makes the lamb love Mary so?" The eager children cried. "Gh, Mary loves the lamb, you know," The teacher quick replied. And you each gentle animal In confidence may bind, And make them follow at your will, If you are only kind. WORDLIST against ['genst] - npOTB appear ['pi] - nOS1BJ1S1TbCS1 be afraid [freid] of sth - 60S1TbCS1 efo-J160 bind [baind] (bound, bound) - 06'beAHt-1TbCS1 confidence ['kn fid(  ) ns] - AOBepi1e cry [krai] - KpVlaTb each [i:1f] - KIDKAbI£1, BCS1Ki1i1 eager ['i:g] - HeTepneJ1BbI£1 fleece ['fli:s] - OBebS1 wepCTb follow ['flu] - ClleAOBaTb gentle [,ctentl] - He>KHbI. llacKoBbI harm ['ha:m] - BpeA keep [ki:p] (kept, kept) - 3alitt-1litaTb kind [kaind] - A06pbl£1 lamb [hem] - S1fHeHOK laugh [la:f] - CMeS1TbCS1 _ Poems lay [lei] (laid. laid) - n0J10>Kt-1Tb linger near ['lil)g:;>] - Aep>KaTbCS1 n06J130CTi1 love ['IA v] - J1106Tb make ['meik] (made, made) - 3aCTaBJ1S1Tb patiently ['peif(  )ntli] - TepnellBo quick [kwik] - 6b1CTPO reply [ri'plai] - OTBeaTb rule ['ru:l] - npaBllo run [rAn] (ran. run) - 3A. nOA6e>KaTb snow [sn:;>u] - CHef still [stH] - Bce >Ke the lamb was sure to go - S1fHeHOK 06S13aTellbHo weJ1 3a Hei1 turn out [t:;>:n :;>ut] - BbifOHS1Tb wait [weit] - >KAaTb will [wit] - >KellaHt-1e 
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) There Was a Little Girl There was a little girl, she had a little curl Right in the middle of her forehead; And when she was good, she was very, very good, And when she was bad, she was horrid. "  (...., , . '*- oL/1 ..:: . .-/ .. \ ,",y 0 J   -R. f'\.. . - '..... -, 'I , . '- j  ,. , I j L'- " I;. ' I , Ill. . , I "':i.\\\ , WORDLIST bear [bc] - MeABeAb bright [brait] - pKlI1 cave [keiv] - 6epJ1ora cub [kAb] - 3A. MeABe>KOHOK curl [k:l] - 3aBTOK dark [da:k] - TeMHbI deep [di:p] - 3A. ryCTO dream [dri:m] - COH - ,J  ;: l\. . \a "'" c(  w Jane Yolen Grandpa Bear's Lullaby The night is long But fur is deep. You will be warm In winter sleep. The food is gone But dreams are sweet And they will be Your winter meat. The cave is dark But dreams are bright And they will serve As winter light. Sleep, my little cubs, sleep. forehead ('frid] - J106 fur (f:] - Mex, wepCTb horrid ('hrid] - }')KaCHbI, oTBpaTTeJ1bHbI light (Iait] - CBeT lullaby ['IAlbai] - K0J1b16eJ1bHa (necH) sweet [swi:t] - CJ1aAKi1 the food is gone - 3A. eCTb Heero they will serve - OHit1 nOCJ1Y)KaT Poems mI 
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) The Wind I saw you toss the kites on high And blow the birds about the sky; And all around I heard you pass, Like ladies' skirts across the grass- o wind, a-blowing all day long, o wind. that sings so loud a song! I saw the different things you did. But always you yourself you hid. I felt you push, I heard you call, I could not see yourself at all- o wind, a-blowing all day long, o wind, that sings so loud a song!  ,. I , ( I , , . , I . I' , \ I , . . ,& -'1  l.. " ,1 j 't( .. ,....' . ] 1 . i li7 . :.r  .\" '\h\' .  '  ..."".,."'t. ., I  -... .., I I \.. '-- ' ,....,. . 1\ , '\ WORDLIST always [':):lwz] - BcerAa bed-clothes rbedklu6z] - nOCTeJ1bHOe 6eJ1be beside [bi'said] - PflAOM bird [b:d] - nTl.\a blow [blu] (about) (blew. blown) - 3A. rHaTb bring out [brilJ aut] (brought, brought) - 3A. CMe- Tb  call [k:l] - OlUU1KaTb different ['difrnt] - pa3HbI drill [dril] - cTpoeBafi nOArOTOBKa feel [fi:l] (felt. felt) - YBcTBoBaTb fleet [fli:t] - (j>J10T, (j>J10TJ1fI head [hed] - r0J10Ba hide [haid] (hid, hidden) - npfiTaTbcfI high [hail - BblCOKO hill [hill - XOJ1M I heard you pass - fI CJ1btWal1 TBoe AYHOBeHe kite [kait] - B03AYWHbI 3Me _ Poems The Land of Counterpane When I was sick and lay a-bed. I had two pillows at my head. And my toys beside me lay To keep me happy all the day. And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills; And sometimes sent my ships in fleets All up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about. ladies skirts ['Ieidiz 'sk:ts] - AaMCKe 106K leaden [ledn] - CBHU.OBbI lie flail (lay, lain) - J1e>KaTb loud [laud] - rpOMKO pillow ['pilu] - nOAYWKa plant [pla:nt] - 3A. B03BOATb send [send] (sent. sent) - nOCblJ1aTb sheet [Ji:t] - npOCTblHfI ship [Jip] - Kopa611b sick [sik] - 60J1bHOH sky [skai] - He60 soldier ['sul<t5] - COllAaT the land of counterpane - CTpaHa Ha OAeflJ1e toss [ts] - nOA6pacblBaTb toy [ti] - rpywKa uniform ['ju;n i f::>:m] - (j>opMa watch [w::>tfl - Ha6J1IOAaTb wind [wind] - BeTep 
 ,-:S;j_ \ C-:-. \ \ l .....  .. - y    '"" -, , . . ) -" , , . I Block City What are you able to build with your blocks! Castles and palaces, temples and docks. Rain may be raining, and other go roam, But I can be happy and building at home. Let the sofa be mountains, the carpet be sea, There I'll establish. a city for me: A kirk and a mill and a palace beside, And a harbour as well where my vessels may ride Great is the palace with pillar and wall, A sort of a tower on the top of it all, And steps coming down in an orderly way To where my toy vessels lie safe in the bay. This one is sailing and that one is moored: Hark to the song of the sailors on. board! And see, on the steps of my palace, the kings Coming and going with presents and things! Now I have done with it, down let it go! All in a moment the town is laid low. Block upon lying scattered and free, What is there left of my town by the sea? WORDLIST a sort of a tower on the top of it all - TO-TO Ha- nOA06e 6aWH HaBepxy bay [bei] - 3aJ1B. 6yxTa be able to do sth - YMeTb AeJ1aTb TO-TO block [bl=>k] - Ky6K board [b=>:d] - 60PT CYAHa build [bild] (built, built) - CTpOTb by the sea - y MOps:l carpet ['ka:pit] - KOBep castle [ka:sl] - 3aMOK city ['si ti] - ropOA come [kAm] (came, come) - npXOATb. npe3- >KaTb come down (in) (came, come) - cnycKaTbCs:I (B) dock [d=>k] - AOK establish [is'trebliJ] - OCHOBbiBaTb free [fri:] - cB060AHO great [greit] - rpoMaAHblt1, BeJ1KM harbour ['ha:b] - raBaHb hark [ha:k] - BcnOMHaTb in a moment - oeHb CKOpO is laid low - J1e>KT B pa3BaJ1HaX king [kilJ] - KOpOJ1b kirk [k:k] - LtepKOBb (WOTJ1.) . let it go - nycTb Bce ce3HeT lie safe - 6b1Tb B 6e30nacHocT mill [mil] - MeJ1bHLta moor [mu] - npaJ1i-1Tb mountain ['mauntin] - ropa orderly way ['=>:dli 'wei] - no nops:lAKY palace ['prel is] - ABopeu. pillar ['pil] - K0J10HHa present ['present] - nOAapOK rain [rein] - AO>KAb ride ['raid] (rode, ridden) - CTOs:lTb Ha s:lKOpe roam [rum] - CTpaHCTBOBaTb sail ['seil] - nJ1b1Tb, OTnJ1b1BaTb sailor ['seil] - MOps:lK scattered ['skretd] - pa36pocaHHblM, paCCblnaH- HbiM sea [si:] - Mope sofa ['suf] - ABaH step [step] - cTyneHbKa temple ['tempI] - xpaM toy [t=>i] - rpyweHblM vessel ['vesl] - Kopa6J1b wall [w=>:I] - CTeHa what is there left of - 'fTO OCraJ10Cb or Poems mJ 
My Shadow I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me, And what can be the use of him is more than I can see. He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head; And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed. The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow - Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow; For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball, And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all. He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play, And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way. He stays so close beside me, he's a coward you can see; I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me! One morning, very early, before the sun was up, I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup; But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head, Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed. " ( t L- It, -..,.. \] WORDLIST arrant sleepy-head - OTbSlBJ1eHHbli1 COHSI be fast asleep [fa:st 'sli:p] - 6blCTPO 3acHyrb buttercup rbAtkAp] - J1IOTK close [klus] - 6J13KO coward rkaud] - TPYC dew [dju:] - poca from the heels up to the head - C Hor AO rOl1OBbi grow [gru] (grew, grown) - BblpaCTaTb I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me. - MHe 6b1110 6b1 CTblAHO TaK HeOTBSl3HO CJ1e- AOBaTb 3a HSlHe, KaK 3Ta TeHb CJ1eAyeT aa MHO. mJ Poems india-rubber rindj'rAb] - KaYYK. KaYYKoBbI lazy rleizi] - J1eHBbl make a fool of me - AypaT MeHSI notion rnuf(d)n] - nOHSlT"'e oug ht to [:t] - cl1eAyeT proper [Ipr=>p] - HOPMaJlbHbli1 rise [raiz] (rose; risen) - BCTaBaTb shadow ['Jredu] - TeHb shoot up [Ju:t Ap] - 3A.' CTaHOBTbCSl 
\ , ( I '- .'\\ . 1- \ . .. .. t-, I " ,... .   - L , \. ' .-' f -.. , . i \: &&1 --- '\ \ 'I f( L . 1  't' I , .. """\ C '1) l . " \, (  -, -f. \ , -...... ........ " J :1 - '" l L r-_ - . WORDLIST along ['IIJ] - BAOJ1b brink (brilJk] - Kpai1 (06pblBa), KPYTOH 6eper camp [kremp] - llarepb crawl [kr:l] - n01l3TVI fire ['fai] - orOHb firelit ['fai1it] - oCBeeHHblt1 orHeM KocTpa follow ['flu] - 3A. ATVI forest ['frist] - llecHot1 gun [gAn] - PY)I(be in the dark ['da:k] - B TeMHOTe land [lrend] - CTpaHa lie [lai] (lay, lai n) - J1e)l(aTb light [lait] (lit; lit) - 3a)l(raTb like [laik] - KaK, nOAo6Ho , The Land of Story-Books At evening when the lamp is lit, Around the fire my parents sit; They sit at home and talk and sing, And do not play at anything. Now, with my little gun, I crawl All in the dark along the wall, And follow round the forest track Away behind the sofa back. There, in the night, where none can spy, All in my hunter's camp I lie, And play at books that I have read Till it is time to go to bed. These are the hills, these are the woods, These are my starry solitudes; And there the river by whose brink The roaring lions come to drink. I see the other far away As if in firelit camp they lay, And I, like to an Indian scout, Around their party prowled about. none [nAn] - H OAVlH, HViKTO party ['pa:ti:] - KOMnaHSJ prowl [praul] - KpacTbcSJ roaring ['r:rilJ] - pbl...a scout [skaut] - pa3BeAYK sing [silJ] (sang, sung) - neTb sofa back ['suf brek] - cnHKa AViBaHa solitude ['slitju:d] - yeAHeHHoe MeCTO spy [spai] - wnOHVlTb story-books ['st:ri'buks] - 3A. paCCKa3b1 0 npVl- KJ1IOYeHSJX talk ['t:k] - pa3roBapBaTb track [trrek] - TponVlHKa Poems _ 
.. Windy Nights Whenever the moon and stars are set, Whenever the wind is high, All night long in the dark and wet, A man goes riding by. Late in the night when the fires are out, Why does he gallop and gallop about? Whenever the trees are crying aloud, And ships are tossed at sea, By on the highway, low and loud, By at the gallop goes he. By at the gallop he goes, and then By he comes back at the gallop again. ...  , -- (  ) -- ... · " "=-' -t \  ,:::;: ..  /'-- J\ ;;J  - . - -- .., 'Y - '-',  - '.\ i ( t . \\J (' c- { r f . .._ Weather Song Anonymous . When the weather is wet, We must not fret. When the weather is cold, We must not scold. When the weather is warm, We must not storm- But be thankful together, Whatever the weather. WORDLIST again [Igen] - onSlTb, CHOBa anonymous ['nnims] - aHoHMHbl cold ['kuld] - X01l0AHbl come back [kAm brek] - B03Bpaw.aTbcSI cry aloud [krai 'laud] - rpOMKO KpaTb favourite ('feivrit] - 1l106Mbli1 fires [fires] are out - orOHb norac fret [fret] - pa3Apa>KaTbCSI gallop ['grelp] - CKaKaTb. HeCTCb raJIOnOM highway ['haiwei] - 60J1bWaSi Aopora moon [mu:n] - J1YHa poet ['puit] - n03T ride [raid] (rode. ridden) - exaTb BepxoM scold [skuld] - 6paHi<1Tb(cSI) set [set] - Ca.o.TbCSI, 3aXOATb (0 llYHe) star [sta:] - 3Be3Aa storm [st:m] - 6yweBaTb thankful ['8rel)kful] - 6J1arOAapHbI together [tlge()] - BMeCTe toss [ts] - KAaTb. 6pocaTb warm [w:m] - TenJ1b1t1 weather [Iwe()] - norOAa wet [wet] - CblpaSi whatever the weather - KaKaSi 6b1 norOAa H 6b1J1a whenever [wenlev] - BCSlK pa3. KorAa windy ['windi] - BeTpeHblt1 g Poems 
Robert P. Tristram Coffin (1892)  I ) ' 'I '\. 'i   t" .. '" . Jl.' , · . ,1Y"1, . ..V,' :" 0,; ,) .: ' ,t ,'" ' .:' I ): .. .' .. t ': (  . ",--. 'D" . , ' . ' , \'. U  ' ( , J '. b " , ' ".. .- 0 " WORDLIST awaken ['weikn] - npacblnaTbcSI bare ['be] - arOJ1eHHblt1 crown [kraun] - BeHeu glory ['gl:>:ri] - rOPAocTb glow [glu] - nblJ1 hidden [hidn] - cnpSlTaHHoe His two hands were curved apart in the semblance of a heart. - Era PYKLt1 6b1J1 CJ10>KeHbI B Be cepAua. kindle [kindl] - 3A. 3aCBeTTbCSl light [lait) (lit. lit) - 03apSlTb No son awake could bear to know. - npOCHYB- WCb, H OAH CblH He CMor 6b1 nOCTHLfb 3TO. "Children's children are the crown of old men; and the glory of children are their fathers." Proverb The Secret Heart Across the years he could recall His father one way best of all. In the stillest hour of night The boy awakened to a light. Half in dreams, he saw his sire With his great hands full of fire. The man had struck a match to see If his son slept peacefully. He held his palms each side the spark His love had kindled in the dark. His two hands were curved apart In the semblance of a heart. He wore, it seemed to his small son, A bare heart on his hidden one, A heart that gave out such a glow No son awake could bear to know. It showed a look upon a face Too tender for the day to trace. One instant, it lit all about, And then the secret heart went out. But it shone long enough for one To know that hands held up the sun. palm [pa:m) -l1aAOHb peacefully ['pi:sfulli] - cnoKot1Ho recall [ri'k:>:l] - BcnOMHaTb secret heart ['si:krit ha:t] - TaHoe cepAue sire ['saia] - oTeu. spark [spa:k] - CKpa · still [stil] - cnoKot1Hblt1 . strike [straik] (struck. struck) - 3A. 3a>KHraTb tender ['tend] - He>KHbI, llacKoBbli1 trace [treis] - pa3J1LfTb Poems _ 
WORDLIST luve = love melodie = melody a' = all wi' = with 0' = of g Poems Robert Burns (1759-1796) A Red, Red Rose a my luve is like a red, red rose That's newly sprung in June: a my luve is like the melodie That's sweetly play'd in tune. As fair art thou, my bonie lass, So deep in luve am I: And I wililuve thee still, my dear, Till a' the seas gang dry: Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear, And the rocks melt wi' the sun; And I wililuve thee still. my dear, While the sands 0' life shall run. And fare thee wee I, my only luve, And fare thee wee I a while! And I will come again, my luve. Tho' it were ten thousand mile! nlO6oBb Jl1060Bb, KaK p03a, p03a KpaCHa5l, LJ.BeTeT B MoeM C8AY. Jl1060Bb M051 - KaK neceHKa, C KOTOPOH B nyrb AY. CllbHee KpaCOTbl TBoeH M051 ll1060Bb OAHa. aHa C T06oH, nOKa MOp51 He BblCOXHyr AO AHa. He BblCOXHyr MOp5l, MOH APyr, He PYWTC5I rpaHT, He OCTaHOBTC5I neCOK, A OH. KaK )I(3Hb, 6e)l(T... 6YAb caCTIU1Ba, M051 ll106oBb. npOli.\a  He rpYCT. BepHYCb K Te6e. XOTb u.ellbl CBeT npW1l0Cb 6bl MHe npOT! nepeBO,lJ. C. MapwaKa tho' = thoug h gang = go weel = well thou - Tbi thee - Te6R 
Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Rudyard Kipling became the first English writer to win the Nobel Prize for literature in 1907. Kipling achieved enormous popularity for his poems and short stories. IF IF YOU CAN KEEP your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; IF you can trust yourself when all men doubt you. But make allowance for their doubting too; I F you can wait and not be tired by waiting. Or. being lied about. don't deal in lies. Or, being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good. nor talk too wise; IF you can dream - and not make dreams your master; IF you can think - and not make thoughts your aim; IF you can meet with triumph and disaster And treat those two impostors just the same; IF you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to broken. And stoop and build'em up with wornout tools; IF you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss. And lose. and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; IF you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve you turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on;" IF you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue. Or walk with kings-nor lose the common touch; IF neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; IF all men count with you. but none too much; IF you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run- Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it. And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son! Poems g 
EcnM... 0, eCIU1 Tbl cnOKoeH, He paCTepSlH, KorAa TepSlIOT r0J10Bbl BOKPyr, VI eCJ1 Tbl ce6e OCTaJ1CfI BepeH, KorAa B Te6f1 He BepT J1YYWti APyr, VI eCJ1 )KAaTb YMeeWb 6e3 BOJ1HeHbSl, He CTaHeWb J10)KblO OTBeyaTb Ha /10)Kb, He 6YAewb 3/106eH, CTaB A/lSi Bcex MweHblO, Ho VI CBSlTblM ce6S1 He Ha30BeWb,- VI eCJ1 Tbl cBoeti BJ1aAeeWb CTpaCTblO, A He To6olO BJ1aCTByeT OHa, VI 6YAeWb TBepA B' YAaye  B HeCyaCTbe, KOTOPblM B CYW.HOCT u.eHa OAHa, VI eCJ1 Tbl rOTOB K TOMY, LITO CJ10BO TBoe B J10BYWKY npeBpaw,aeT nJ1YT, VI, nOTepneB KPyweHbe, MO)KeWb CHOBa - 6e3 npe>KHVlX CVlJ1 - B0306HOBVlTb CBOt1 TPYA,- VI eCJ1 Tbl cnoco6eH Bce, LITO CTaJ10 Te6e npBblLlHblM, BblJ10)KTb Ha CTOJ1, Bce npOVirpaTb  BHOBb HaLlaTb CHaLlaJ1a, He nO)KaJ1eB Toro, LITO npo6peJ1, VI eCJ1 MO>KeWb cepAu.e, HepBbl, )KJ1bl TaK 3aBeCT, LlT06bl BnepeA HeCTCb, KorAa C rOAaM 3MeHS1IOT CJ1bl VI TO/1bKO BOJ1S1 rOBopT: «.D.ep>KCb»! - VI eCJ1 MO)l(eWb 6blTb B TOJ1ne C060fO, np KOpOJ1e C HapOAOM CBfl3b xpaHTb VI, YBa)Kafi MHeHVle J1f06oe, rJ1aBbl nepeA MOJ1BOfO He KJ10HTb, VI eCJ1V1 6YAewb MepTb paccToSlHbe CeKYHAaMVI, nycKaSlcb B AaJ1bHti 6er,- 3eMllSl - TBoe, MOti MallbLlK, AOcToSlHbe. VI 6011ee Toro, Tbl - LleJ10BeK! nepeBOI1. C. fl. MapwaKa &m Poems EcnM BJ1aAeti co6oti cpeA TOJ1nbl cMSlTeHHOC1, Te6S1 KJ1S1HYllteC1 3a CMeTeHbe Bcex, Bepb caM B ce6S1 HanepeKop BceJ1eHHo, A MaJ10BepHb1M oTnycT x rpex. nYCTb Llac He npo6J1, >KA, He YCTaBaSl, nYCTb J1ryr J1)1(eu.bl, He CHCXOA AO HX. YMet1 npOlltaTb  He Ka>KCb, npOUJ,afl, BeJ1KOAYWHet1  MYApet1 APyrx. YMet1 MeLiTaTb, He CTaB pa6M MeLlTaHbSl, VI MbICJ1Tb, MbICJ1Lt1 He 060)l(eCTBLt1B, PaBHO BCTpeLla XBaJ1Y VI noPyraHbe, He 3a6blBaSl, "fTO VlX r0J10C J1)f(Lt1B; OCTaHbcfI TX, KorAa TBoe )Ke CJ10BO KaJ1eLlLt1T nJ1yr, "fTo6 YJ10BJ1S1Tb rJ1ynu.oB, KorAa BCSI >K3Hb pa3pyweHa,  CHOBa Tbl AOJ1)KeH Bce BOCC03AaBaTb C OCHOB. YMeC1 nOCTaBVlTb, B paAOCTHOC1 HaAe>KAe, Ha KapTY Bce, LITO HaKOnJ1 C TPYAOM, Bce nporpaTb VI HVlUJ,Lt1M CTaTb, KaK npe)l(Ae, VI HViKorAa He nO)KaJ1eTb 0 TOM, YMeC1 npVlHYAVlTb cepAu.e, HepBbl, Teno Te6e CJ1Y)I(VlTb, KorAa B TBoeti rPYAVI Y)Ke AaBHo Bce nycTO, Bce cropeJ1o, VI TOJ1bKO BOJ1S1 rOBopVlT: ceVlAVI!» OCTaHbCfI npocT, 6eceAYfi C u.apflMVI, OCTaHbcfI LlecTeH, rOBopfi C TOJ1not1; 6YAb npSlM VI TBepA C BparaMVI VI APY3bSlMVI, nYCTb Bce, B CBOt1 Llac, CLITafOTCfI C To6ot1; HanoJ1HVI CMbICJ10M Ka>KAOe MrHOBeHbe lJacoB VI AHet1 HeYMOJ1L1Mblt1 6er- TorAa BeCb Mp Tbl npVlMewb, KaK BJ1aAeHbe, To rAa , MOt1 CblH, Tbl 6YAewb lfeJ10BeK! nepeBO,D. M. fl03MHcKoro 
.... .. . - . Questions: 1) What poems did you enjoy most? 2) What is the name of the poem? 3) Who is the author of the poem? 4) Why did you enjoy it? 5) What are some special things that you discovered about poetry? 6) Who is your favourite Russian poet? 7) What is his best poem? Why? 8) What things appeal to you most about poetry? 1. Select a poetry book to enjoy and explain. Browse through it to discover the answers to these questions. Write your answers on a sheet of paper. 1) What is the name of the book? 2) Who is the author or editor? 3) Who illustrated the book? 4) What are some special things that you discovered about poetry? 5) List at least five unusual titles of poems. 6) What are some common subjects for poems? 7) What methods are used for grouping or organizing the poems in your book? 8) What things appeal to you most about poetry? 2. Copy a poem that you especially like from any book. Illustrate it, and practice reading it aloud. Share the poem with your class in some way. WORDLIST appeal to smb ['pi:l] - HpaBTbC KOMY-TO at least [li:st] - no. Kpai1He Mepe author ['3:S] - aBTOp browse through ['brauz Sru:] - nepel1Lt1CTaTb copy ['k3pi] - nepenCblBaTb discover [dis'kA V] - Y3HaBaTb enjoy [in'cBi] - nOJ1yyaTb YAOBOJ1bCTBe especially [is'pef(  )li] - oc06eHHo explain [ik'splein] - 06bCHTb group [gru:p] - rpynnpoBaTb illustrate ['ilstreit] - J111IOCTppoBaTb list [list] - COCTaBJ1Tb cnCOK method ['meSd] - 3A. npHun organize ['3:gnaiz] - opraH30BblBaTb poetry ['po(u}itri] - n033 select [si'lekt] - oT6paTb, Bbl6paTb sheet of paper [Ji:t v 'pel p] - J1CT 6YMar special thing ['spef( }l SiD] - oc06eHHocTb title [taitl] - aarJ1aBVIe unusual [An'ju:3ul] - He06b1YHbI use [ju:z] - CnOJ1baOBaTb Poems mJ 
. Aopore APY3b! B HaW AH HepeAKO B03HKaeT Heo6xo- AMOCTb paCCKa3aTb nO-aHrllCK 0 ce6e, CBOX YBlleeHX, 0 MeCTaX, KOTOpble CTO- T nOCeTTb B Hawe CTpaHe. TeMbl, KOTopble Bbl npOllTeTe, nOMoryr BaM B aTOM. )I(ellaeM ycnexa! 
Together we are strong. Proverb BMeCre Mbl CltfflbHbl. nOCJ10BVlu.a About myself My name is Kiril. My surname is Pavlov. I'm twelve years old. I was born in 1985 in Pskov. I live at 23 New Street. We live in a small flat on the second floor. My phone number is one four seven two five three. I go to school. I am in the seventh form. I like English very much. I like reading. I think comics and detective novels are easier to read than real books, but I prefer to read novels. I like music. I play the piano and compose my own songs. I like Russian clas- sical music very much. My favourite Russian composers are Tchaikovsky, Ra- khmaninov and Sviridov. I don't like pop music at all. I don't often go out in the evenings during the week, because I have too much homework, but on Satur- days I usually go out with my friends. We often go to the park or to the cinema. I don't like to watch television. I like fresh air and exercise! In the summer I often go cycling. I play tennis and go swimming. I like tennis. It's very good for arms and legs. Tennis is fun. My mother is a housewife. She is warm-hearted, generous, optimistic and very lively. She has got long dark hair and green eyes. She isn't very tall. My mother is very beautiful. She is an artistic type. She paints and draws very well. Sometimes she does pottery and sculpture. She goes to art exhibitions as of- ten as possible. My father is a bus driver. My father's name is Nick. He's got a good sense of humour. He's tall and he's got fair hair and blue eyes. He's in his forties. He's very handsome. He likes photography and his hobby is woodcraft. In summer he goes fishing. It's very relaxing. I've got one brother. His name is Petya. He's seventeen. He is a student. He is kind and friendly. He is very musical. He plays the guitar very well. He makes cassette recordings of friend's records. He listens to music in the eve- nings and often goes to concerts at weekends. He is quite tall and likes to play basketball. My brother looks very like my mother. I look more like my father. I've got my father's eyes, but I'.ve got my mother's personality. My father's mother and father, my grandparents, live in the village. They have, got a pig and piglets, a cow and a calf, two sheep and three lambs, a horse and a foal, twelve hens and many chicks, a cat and two kittens. I like to go to the village and help them with their animals. My other grandmother is a pensioner. She helps mum to keep the house in order. She likes to cook. She is a very tidy person and cleans the house every day. She is a very practical person. She likes making things. She often sews and knits in the evenings. In spring she likes to do some gardening, but her hobby is to watch T.V. She is very kind. She likes to give presents. I love her very much. We are all great friends. PaCCKa3 KHpMnna 0 ce6e MeH 30Byr Kp1111. Mo 4>aM11 naB11oB. MHe 12 11eT.  pOALt111C51 B 1985 rOAY B nCKoBe.  )I(BY B AOMe 23 Ha HOBoti Y11ue. Mbl )I(BeM B Ma- 11eHbKoti KBapTpe Ha TpeTbeM STa)l(e. Moti HOMep Te11ecJ:>oHa 147253.  XO>KY B WK011Y.  yYCb B ceAbMOM Kllacce. MHe 04eHb HpaBTC51 aHr11ticKt1.  111061110 TaTb. nO-MoeMY, KOMKCbl  AeTeKTBbl 11ep.le TaTb, eM cepbe3- Hble KHr, HO 51 npeAn04TalO 4TaTb pOMaHbl.  111061110 MY3bIKY.  Lt1rpalO Ha naHHO  CO'-lH5I1O CBO c06cTBeHHbie neCH.  04eHb 111061110 PYCCKYIO 10 KHHra AIIS1 4TeHHSI K Y4e6HHKY .C4aCTJ1. aHrJ1.-2. Topics fB) 
 =R- ...  5Ni fDJ Topics K11aCCl1\.1eCKYIO MY3b1KY. M011 1110611Mble PyccKl1e KOMn0311Topbl: '-IatiKoBcKVlt1, PaxMaHl1HoB 11 CBVlpVlAOB. s:J COBceM He 111061110 non-MY3bIKY.  He \.IaCTO BbIXO- >K'J noryl1Tb no BeLlepaM B 6YAH11 , nOTOMY LITO y MeH C11WKOM MHoro AO- MaWHIt1X 3aAaHlt1ti. HO no cy660TaM  06blLlHO BbIXO)f(}' nory11Tb C APY3bMIt1. Mbl \.IaCTO XOAIt1M B napK VlI1It1 KIt1HO.  He 111061110 CMOTpeTb TelleBVl30p.  11106- 1110 CBe)KVlt1 B03AY>< VI cnopT. JleToM fllfaCTO KaTalOCb Ha Be110CVlneAe, It1rpafO B TeHHVlC VI n11aBalO. S1111061110 TeHHVlC. OH oeHb n0l1e3eH AJl PYK It1 Hor. TeH- HVIC - 3TO 3AOPOBO! Mo MaMa - AOMOxo3S1Ka. OHa BenVlKOAYWHa, Ao6pocepAe4Ha, onTVI- Ml1CTVI\.IHa 1'1 OlfeHb nOAB11)KHa. Y Hee AJ1V1HHble TeMHble B0110Cbl11 3e11eHbie rna- 3a. OHa HeBblCOKoro pOCTa. Mo MaMa oeHb KpaC11Bafi. Y Hee TOHKaS1 XYAO- )KeCTBeHHaSl Hal)'pa. OHa XOPOWO n11weT MaC110M 11 plt1cyeT KapaHAawOM. it1HorAa OHa 3aHVlMaeTC KepaMIt1Kot1 11 cKynbnrypo. KorAa 6blBaeT B03MO)l(- HOCTb, OHa XOAVIT Ha xYAO)l(eCTBeHHble BbICTaBKVI. Mot1 OTell, - BOA11Tellb aBTo6yca. Moero oTu,a 30ByT HVlKollaVi. Y Hero xo- powee lfYBCTBO IOMopa. OH BbICOK(,1. Y Hero CBeTl1ble B0110Cbl VI r011y6ble rna- 3a. EMY 3a COpOK. OH OlfeHb KpaCVlBblVi. EMY HpaBVlTC 3aHVlMaTbCS1 <l>OTO- rpac:t>lt1eti, It1 ero 11106V1MOe 3aHTVle - pe3b6a no AepeBY. JleToM OH XOAIt1T Ha pbI6a11KY. 3TO O\.leHb ycnOKal1BaeT. Y MeH OAl1H 6paT. Ero 30Byr neTS1. EMY 17 11eT. OH cl)'AeHT. OH Ao6pbl It1 npl1BeTl111BbI. OH O\.leHb MY3b1Kal1eH. OH 04eHb xopowo VlrpaeT Ha r1l1Tape. OH AenaeT MarHTocl:>oHHble 3an11CIt1 C nnaCTJIIHOK APY3et1. no BeLlepaM OH cl1ywa- eT MY3blKY VI aCTO XOAl1T Ha KOHLJ.epTbl no BbIXOAHbIM. OH AOBOllbHO BbICOK1-1  ll106111T l1rpaTb B 6aCKeT60/1. Mot1 6paT 04eHb noxo)l( Ha MOIO MaMY. s:I 6011b- we noxo)l( Ha nany. Y MeHfI nanHbl rlla3a, HO xapaKTep MaM1-1H. MaMa VI nana Moero OTua. MOVI AeAywKa C 6a6YWKOVl, )l(VlByr B AepeBHe. Y HIt1X CBVlHbS1 VI nopocSlTa, KopOBa VI TelleHOK. ABe OBU,bI VI Tp1l1 S1rHeHKa, 110WaAb (,1 )Kepe6eHOK, ABeHa.n.u,aTb KYP VI MHoro u,bln11T, KOWKa 11 ABa KOTeHKa. S111106- 1110 e3ATb B AepeBHIO It1 nOMoraTb 11M C l1X >K1-1BOTHbIMl1. MoS1 APyraS1 6a6YWKa Ha.neHc. OHa nOMoraeT MaMe no AOMY. OHa 1110611T rOTOBIt1Tb. OHa O\.leHb onpS1THafi 1-1 Ka)KAblt1 AeHb y6V1paeT B AOMe. OHa OLleHb npaKT1I1Ha. OHa 111061-1T pYKOAenbHVI\.IaTb: OHa \.IaCTO WbeT VI B51)1(eT no Be4epaM. BecHo OHa 11106111T pa60TaTb B CaAY, HO ee 11106V1MOe 3aHSlTIt1e - CMOTpeTb Te11eB1-130p. OHa O\.leHb A06paSl111110611T Ael1aTb nOAapKVI. s:J OlfeHb ee 111061110. Mbl Bce 6011bW1-1e APY- 3bSl. Questions and answers: 1) What is your name? 2) Where and when were you born? 3) How old are you? 4) What do you do? 5) Are you a student? 6) Where do you live? 7) What is your address? 8) What's your phone number? 9) What colour hair have you got? 10) What colour eyes have you got? 11) Who do you look like? 12) What sort of music do you like? 13) Do you like rock music? 14) Do you play any instrument? My name's Kiril. I was born in Pskov in 1985. I'm twelve. I go to school. /1' m a student./ I'm at school. Yes, I am. I live in Pskov in New Street. 23 New Street. One four seven two five three. I've got fair hair. I've got blue eyes. My Mum. Folk music. Yes, I do. / No, I don't. Yes, I do. / No, I don't. 
15) What kind of music don't you like? 16) What sort of food do you like? 17) Do you like fish? 18) Do you like reading? 19) What sort of books do you like? 20} Do you like science fiction? 21) What do you do in the evening? .22) What do you do at the weekend? 23) Can you play chess? 24) Have you got any brothers or sisters? , 25) What is his name? 26) What does your mother do? 27) What colour are your mother's eyes? WORDLIST artistic [a:'tistik] - XYAO>KeCTBeHHbI as often as possible [':fn rez 'p:)sbl] -TaK lIaCTO, KaK B03MO>KHO beautiful ['bju:tful] - KpaCBaSl (>KeHw.Ha) bus driver [bAS 'draiv] - BOAL.1TeJ1b aBTo6yca calf [ka: f] - TelleHOK cat - KOWKa cassette recording [kre'set ri'k:):dilJ] -3anCb Ha Kaccery clean [kli:n] -y6L.1paTb. lICTTb comics ['kmiks] - KOMKCbl compose [km'pduz] - COCTaBJ1Tb. COllHstTb composer [km'puz] - KOMn03TOp concert ['k:)nst] - KOHuepT cook [kuk] - rOTOBL.1Tb cow [kau] -KopOBa detective novels [di'tektiv 'nvdlz] - AeTeKTBbl do some gardening [sAm 'ga:dnil)] - pa60TaTb B caAY draw [dr:] - pcoaaTb KapaHAawOM during ['djudril)] - BO BpeMSI easy ['i:zi] -llerKO exhibition [,eksi'biJ(d)n] - BbiCTaBKa fair [f£] -CBeTJ1b1, 6eJ1oKypbl favourite ['feivdrit] -11106MbI foal [ful] ->Kepe6eHoK fresh [fren - CBe>K friendly ['frendli] - APy>KeJ1t06HbI. npL.1BeTJ1BbI fun [fAn] - 3.0.. YAOBOJ1bCTBe generous ['c3enrs] - 6J1arOpoAHbI. BellKoAYW'" Hbl, Llte.o.Pblt1 go cycling ['saiklio] -e3ATb Ha BeJ10Cne.o.e go out - BblXO.o.Tb ryJ1S1Tb I don't like jazz. Meat and vegetables. Yes, I do. / No, I don't. Yes, I do. / No, I don't. Novels. Yes, I do. / No. I don't. I like reading. I go out with my friends. Yes, I can. / No. I can't. Yes. I have. I've got one brother. / No. I haven't. Petya. She is a housewife. Green. guitar [gi'ta:] - rTapa handsome ['hrensm] - KpaCL.1BbI (My>KlIHa) he's in his forties ['f:tiz] - aMY 3a COpOK horse [h:s] -nOWaAb housewife ['hauswaif] - AOMOX03S1MKa it's very relaxing [ri'lreksiI)J - 3TO 3AOPOBO ycnoKa- aaeT keep the house in order [ki:p () hauz in ':d:)]- nOMoraTb no AOMY. no X03S1MCTBY kind [kaind] -A06pblj;1 kitten ['kitn] - KOTeHOK knit [n it] - BSl3aTb lamb [Irem] -SlrHeHOK, Oee"lKa lively ['Iaivli] - nO.o.B>KHbI look like [luk laik] - 6b1Tb nOXO>KHM novel ['nv()l] -pOMaH own [un] - co6cTBeHHbI£1 paint [peint] -3.0.. nHcaTb MaCIIOM pensioner ['penf dn d) - neHcHOHep personality Lp:s'nreliti] -oco6eHHOCT xapaKTepa pig - CBHbSl piglet ['piglit] - nopoceHoK pottery ['p=>triJ - rllHSlHble 3AenS1. KepaMKa prefer [pri'fd:] - npeAnO"lTaTb quite [kwait] - BnOJ1He, COBepweHHO record ('rek:d] - nJ1aCTHKa sculpture ['skAlptf] - CKYnbnrypa sense of humour [Isens v 'hju:m] -"fYBCTBO tOMopa sew [su] -WTb sheep lfi:p] - oBu.a, 6apaH tidy ['taidi] -OnpSITHblt1. aKKypaTHbI£1 warm-hearted Lw:m'ha:tid] -Ao6pocepAeYHaSl woodcraft ('wudkra:ft] - pe3b6a no AepeBY Topics fDJ 
&m Topics AI/ for one; one for al/. Alexandre Dumas O,lJ.HH 3a Beex H Bee 38 O,lJ.HOro. A11eKcaH.Qp ,lJ.tOMa My family Every family where every_one is responsible for its comfort, success in work, health and good spirits must be a strong unit. We ought not to forget that we are members of society and family is the most important thing for each of us. The children whose parents take proper care of them are very grateful to them either now or afterwards when they become grown-ups. As for my family, it is not large. There are four of us: a father, a mother, a brother and me. We love each other and try to help each other. We are very anxious when any of us is unhappy in some way. My father is 38. He is a doctor. He works at a hospital. He treats people and gives them health and advice. I know he is respected by his patients. My mother is 35. Her work at a factory is hard, but she likes it very much. My brother is younger than me. He is 10 years old. He is a schoolboy. He is a good tennis player. I have seen him playing tennis several times. He likes me to come to the stadium and see him playing tennis. My father and mother sometimes go there too. Certainly my mother is the housekeeper in our family. She is a very good cook. She knows what is necessary for our family. She goes shopping and cooks very nice and tasty things. All of us try to help her whenever we can. Dad often goes to the market. I go to the dairy and my brother goes to the baker's. Our grandparents do not live with us. They come to see us and we call them very often. We usually get together on our family holidays (mostly birhdays), on New Year's Eve or other festivals. Our family members love each other. Those who come to us say that our family is very nice. MOR ceMbR KIDKAaSJ ceMbSJ, rAe Bce OTBeljalOT 3a ycnex B pa60Te, 3AopOBbe, xopowee HaCTpoeHe  nOKo APyr APyra, C/lbHa CBOM eAHCTBOM. Mbl He AO/l)l(Hbl 3a- 6blBaTb, TO Mbl - ljJ1eHbl 06w,ecTBa  ceMbSJ BJ1SJeTCSJ caMblM BIDKHblM AJl KIDK- Aoro 3 Hac. AeT, 0 KOTOpblX xopOWO 3a60TSJTcSJ pOATeJ1, BcerAa M 6/laro- AapHbl-/l60 B AeTcTBe, J160 TorAa, KorAa cTaHyr B3pOCJ1bIM. . lfTO KacaeTcSJ Moe ceMb, OHa He60/lbwaSJ. Hac ljeTBepo: nana, MaMa, 6paT  SJ. Mbl /l106M APyr APyra  cTapaeMcSJ nOMoraTb APyr APYry. Mbl oeHb nepe:>KBaeM, KorAa KTO-TO 3 Hac noeMY-TO HeCljaCT/lB. MoeMY nane - 38 /leT, OH Bpalf. OH pa60TaeT B 60/lbHu.e. OH /leT /lIOAe  nOMoraeT M  C/lOBOM  Ae/lOM. s:I 3HalO, TO nau.eHTbl ero YBIDKaIOT. Moe MaMe - 35. Ee pa60Ta Ha <t>a6Ke T:>Ke/la, HO OHa eti OlfeHb Hpa- BTCSJ. Mo 6paT M/lat\we MeHSJ. EMY 10 /leT. OH WKO/lbHK. OH Xopow TeHH- CCT. HecKo/lbKO pa3  BAe/l, KaK OH rpaeT B TeHHC. OH /l106T, lfT06bl SJ npXOA/l Ha CT8AOH  CMOTpe/l, KaK OH rpaeT B TeHHc. Mo nana  MaMa TO)l(e HorAa TYAa XOASJT. KOHe4HO, MOSJ MaMa BeAeT AOMaWHee X03SJCTBO B Hawe ceMbe. OHa OlfeHb Xopowo rOToBT. OHa 3HaeT, ljTO He06xOAMO Hawe ceMbe. OHa Ae- /laeT nOKynK  rOTOBT oeHb npSJTHbie  BKycHble Bew,. Mbl Bce CTapaeMCSI nOMOlfb e, KorAa MO:>KeM. nana lfacTo XOAT Ha pbIHOK. s:I XO>KY B MO/lOlfHbl Mara3H, a MO 6paT XOAT B 6Y/l0HYIO. Haw AeAYWK  6a6YWK >KByT He c HaM. OH npXOAS1T K HaM, a Mbl 
r --J ...  g oeHb acTo M 3BOHM. 06blHO Mbl c06paeMcSl BMecTe Ha Hawx ceMe- HblX npa3AHKax - B OCHOBHOM Ha AHSIX pO)l(.lJ.eHSI, Ha HOBbl rOA JlVl APyrVlx npa3AHKax. Bce B Hawet1 ceMbe 11106S1T APyr APyra. Te, KTO npVlxoAT K HaM, rOBop51T, TO y Hac oeHb xopowa51 ceMbSl. Answer these questions, please. 1} Do you know all of your aunts and uncles? How many of them have you met? Which ones are older or younger than your father or mother? 2} Do you know all of your cousins? How many of them have you seen? Who are the new ones? When did you last see them? When will you get a chance to see all these relatives again? Your Dad's and Mum's Job 1} Where does your father work? Does he work in a factory? In an office? On a farm? In a garage? Does your Mum work at home? 2} How does your Dad get to work? . Does he go by bus? By train? By car? {in a car pool}? Does he walk to work? 3} Does he work full-time or part-time? 4} How many hours a week does he work? 5} Does he ever work overtime? 6} Does he work days or nights? 7} Does he like his job? 8} How long has he been working there? 1 . Please, read this together. Occupation 1. She's a teacher. 2. He's a factory worker. 3. He's a farm worker. 4. She's a baby sitter. 5. He's a photographer. 6. She's a singer. 7. He's a baker. Work She teaches in a school. He works in a factory. He works on a farm. She looks after children. He photographs people. She sings songs. He bakes bread. -er, -or, -man, -woman Many other occupation-words end with -er: manager, writer, buyer, seller, maker, helper, owner, grower, reporter, cleaner, mover, reader, designer, lawyer, firefighter (A.E.), farmer, mail carri- er (A. E.}, grocer. T.V. reporter, teacher, police officer (A. E.}. Some occupation-words end with -or: director, conductor, telephone operator, actor, doctor, inspector, instruc- tor, etc. Some occupation-words end with -man: policeman, fireman, salesman, postman, repairman, milkman, camera- man, chairman, fisherman, handyman, etc. Topics fiB 
Some of these occupation-words also end with -woman and -person be- cause many women do these jobs today: saleswoman, policewoman. 2. How many occupations that end with -er, -or, -man, and - woman can you name? Take turns naming these occupations. The last person to name an occupation is the winner. manager - ynpaBllsno. AYJpeKTop buyer - nOKYnaTeJ1b seller - ToproBeu. npo.QaBeu maker-npoM3BOATeJ1b,M3rOTOBeJ1b helper - nOMOI.ijHK owner - BJ1aAeJ1eu gardener - CaAOBHK reporter - penoprep, KoppeCnOHAeHT cleaner - CTJ1bK, y60pHK mover- Hu.VlaTOp. aBTOp (lo1Ae. nJ1aHa) reader - 'U1TaTeJ1b designer - KOHCTPYKTOP, npOeKTpoBw.MK. AH3aHep lover -11106TeJ1b director - AHpeKTOP. PyKOBOATel1b conductor-KoHAYKTOp,npOBoAHMK telephone operator - onepaTop Ha Tel1e4>oHHo£1 CTaHUH actor - aKTep. apTCT inspector -MHCneKTOp. peBM30p instructor - HHCTPYKTOp. npenOAaBaTeJ1b fireman - nO>KapHbI£1 salesman - npO.QaBeu saleS\Noman - npoAaBUU1ua posbnan--nOqranbOH repairman - peMOHTHbI£1 MacTep milkman - npoAaBeu M0J10Ka WORDLIST afterwards ['a:ftwdz] - nOTOM, n03)Ke anxious erelJkfs] --o3a60eHHbI£1 baby sitter ['beibi 'sit] - npHXOll.\aSJ HSJHSJ. OCTalOw.aSJCSJ C AeTbM 3a nJ1ary bake - neb. BbineKaTb baker ['beik] - neKapb. 6Y110HHK baker's ['beik:)z] - 6YJ10"fHaSJ car pool [ka: p u: 1] - aBTOM06HJ1b. Ha KOTOpOM B3pOCJ1b1e no oepeAH B03SJT B WKOJ1Y HeCKOJ1bKO AeTet1 certainly ['s:tnli] - KOHeHO comfort ['leArn f:)t] -- YA06cTBO. nOKot1 cook [kuk] -noaap. KyXapKa dairy ['d£ri] - M0I10HbI£1 ever ['ev] - KorAa-I160. scer.Qa factory ('frekt()ri] -3aBOA. 4>a6pMKa farm [fa:rn] -4>ePMa. 4>epMepcKoe x03SJ£1cTBO farm worker ['fa:rn Iw:k] - Cel1bCKM pa60H full-time ['ful,tairn] - nOI1HbI pa60"l AeHb J1H nOl1Hcm pa6oaSl HeAeJ1S1 go shopping (gu IJ:JpilJ] -AeJ1aTb nOKYnKM. XOAHTb no Mara3HHaM grateful ['greitful] - 611arOAaPHbI flm Topics cameraman - KHHoonepaTop chairman - npeACeppTeJ1b fisherman - pbl6aK handyman - MaCTep Ha Bce PYKM; "feJ10BeK, BblnOJ1- Hsnow.t1 pa3Hble MeJ1lG1e nOAeJ1KM firefighter - (necHo£1) nO>KapHHK doctor - Bpa..., AOKTOP farmer - <!>epMep dentist - ay6Hot1 Bpa mail carrier - nOqraJIbOH construction worker - CTpOTeJ1b nurse - MeAMI..\MHCKaSI ceCTpa police officer - nOJ1l..\et1cKHt1 dentist - ay6Ho£1 Bpa"l school crossing guard - l.fe110BeK. nepeBoASlw.M WKOJ1bHKOB "Iepea AOpory astronaut - aCTpOHaBT, KOCMOHaBT car mechanic - aBTocnecapb lawyer - aABOKaT judge - CYAbSi grocer - npOAaBel..\ 6aKaJlet1HbIX ToaapOB cashier - KaCCHp librarian - 66J1L-10TeKapb pilot - nJ10T, JleT"fK T.V. reporter - TellepenopTep grown-up [.gr:)un'Ap] - BapOCJ1b1t1 housekeeper ['haus,ki:p] - l.fe110BeK. KOTOpbl BeAeT AOMaWHee X03SJCTBO job [:Jb] - pa6oTa, cJ1y>K6a market ['rna:kit] - pblHOK necessary ['ness:)ri] - Heo6xoAMblt1 occupation = job [.:Jkju'peif(  )n] - 3aHTi-1e, npo<PeccSI part-time ['pa:ttairn] - HenOJ1HbI£1 pa60Mt1 AeHb J1H HeAeJ1SJ photograph ['futgra:f] - 4>oTorpa4>HpoBaTb. CHMaTb photographer [f't:Jg rf ] - 4>oTorpa4> proper [lpr:Jp:)] - npaBJ1bHbI£1 respect [ris'pekt] - YBIDKaTb responsible (ris'p:Jnsbl] - oTBeTcTBeHHblt1 sing (silJ] (sang. sung) - neTb spirits ['spirits] - HacTpoeHe take care of (teik k£(r) :Jv] -3a6oTbcSI tasty ['teisti] - BKYCHbI unit ['ju:nit] - eAHHHu.a. COI03; 3A. eAHCTBO whenever [wen'ev] - BCSlK" pa3. KorAa work overtime ['QuvQtaim] - pa60TaTb CBepXYPO"lHO 
 :;;;R ... l'I g A man's home is his castle. Proverb MOH p,OM - MOR KpenOCTb. nOCJ10BVltta Our flat When we speak about our flat we like to say "it is cosy". "it is comfortable". People must have a very cosy and comfortable flat. It is the place where they live. rest and sleep. They create a pleasant home with their own hands. Every- one in the family is responsible for its cleaning and keeping it in order. , My family and I live in a two-room apartment in a block of flats of five floors. Our flat is on the second floor. There is a bedroom, a living-room. a kitchen. a hall, and a bathroom in it. There is a balcony too. There are a lot of flowers there from early spring to late autumn. My room is not large. There is a sofa, a writing-table and a chair, a ward- robe and a piano in the room. My room faces the North. It is very light. The living-room is large. There is a dining-table with four chairs. a cup- board. two armchairs. a wall unit and a sofa. There is a T.V.-set, a tape-re- corder and a record-player in the room. There are also several book-shelves there. The floor is covered with a beautiful carpet. There are two landscapes on the wall. In the kitchen we have hot and cold running water. a gas stove; there is a table and chairs, a cupboard and shelves. Our home is very nice and hospi- table! Hawa KBapTMpa KorAa Mbl rOBopM 0 Hawe KBapTpe. HaM HpaBTCS1 rOBOpil1Tb "oHa YIOT- Ha". "oHa YA06Ha". Y 11IOAe A011>1<Ha 6blTb YIOTHa iI1 YA06Ha KBapTpa. 3TO MeCTo. rAe OH >I<Byr, oTAblxalOT  cnT. YIOT B HeM 11IOA c03AalOT CBO- MiI1 PYKaM. KIDKAbl B ceMbe oTBeaeT 3a 4CTOTY  nopAoK B AOMe. Mo ceMb   >l<iI1BeM B ABYXKoMHaTHo KBapTiI1pe nT3Ta>KHOrO AOMa. Hawa KBapTpa Ha TpeTbeM 3Ta>l<e. B Het1 eCTb cna11bHSI. rocTHaSl. KYXHSI. npxo)l(a  BaHHaS1. baJ1KOH eCTb TO)l(e. C paHHe BecHbl AO n03AHei1 oceH TaM MHoro LJ.BeToB. Mo KOMHaTa He6011bwaS1. B KOMHaTe - ABaH. nCbMeHHbI CT011 1t1 Cry11. wKa<t> iI1 n1t1aH1t1HO. MOS1 KOMHaTa BblXOAiI1T OKHaMiI1 Ha ceBep. OHa 04eHb CBeT- 11aS1. rOCTHaS1 60JlbWaS1. 8 HeVi eCTb 06eAeHHbl crOJl c 4eTblpbM CTYJlbM. wKa<t> AJl nocYAbl. ABa Kpec11a Li1 ABaH. ECTb Te11eBLi130p. MarHTo<t>oH  npo- rpbIBaTeJlb. Ew.e eCTb HeCKOl1bKO KH)I(HbIX n0110K. nOJl nOKpblT KpaC1t1BbIM KOBpOM. Ha CTeHe ABa neL43IDKa. Ha KYXHe y Hac eCTb X0110AHaSl iI1 ropSIaSl BOAa. ra30BaSl n11Ta; eCTb CTOI1 iI1 Cryl1b. nocYAHblt1 WKa<t>  nOJlK. Haw AOM oeHb xopowi1 iI1 rOCTenpH- i-1MHblL4. Questions for conversation: Your home in the city 1) Do you live in an apartment/ flat? 2) How many rooms are there in your apartment/ flat? 3) How many apartments/ flats are there in your building? 4) What floor do you live on? 5) Does your building have an elevator / lift? Topics fDJ 
6) Does your building have a laundry room? 7) How large is the kitchen? 8) Does it have fire escapes? 9) Does your building have balconies? 10) Does it have a recreation room? What do people do there? 11) Do you have a pet? What kind? 12) Do you have a windovv' box? If you do, what do you plant there? Your home in the country 1) Do you live in a private house? 2) Does your house have a porch? 3) Does it have a yard? 4) Is there a garage? 5) Is it a new house? 6) Is it a big house? 7) Is there a fence around the yard? 8) Are there any trees in the yard? How many? What kind? 9) Do you have a garden? What do you grow in it? 10) Do you have any pets? What kind? WORDLIST . apartment [Ipa:tmnt] - KBapTt.1pa building ['bildil)] -3AaHt.1e, CTpOeHt.1e comfortable ['kAmftbl] -YA06Hbli1 cosy ['kuzi] - YIOTHbli:1 create [kri:'eit] - C03A(lBaTb elevator [.eli'veit] - J1V1<J>T fence [fens] -3a60p, 3ropoAb fire escape ['fai is'keip] - nO>KapHaSJ J1eCTHVlu.a floor [fl::>:] - 3TIDK, nOJ1 grow [Igru] (grew, grown) - Bblpall.lt.1BaTb keep in order [ki:p in ':d] - (co)Aep)KaTb B nopS1AKe porch [p:tf1- KpblJ1bU.O, BepaHA(l, Teppaca private ['praivit] - acTHblt1, J1Hbli:1 recreation room [.rekri'eiJ( )n rum] - KOMHaTa AJlSJ OTAblXa responsible [ris'pnsbl] - oTBeTcTBeHHbli1 window box ['windu b::>ks] - Hap}')KHbI SJIl.lVlKAJlSJ pacTeHVI yard [ja: d] - ABOp fIm] Topics 
The busy have no time for tears. Byron Kor):{a 3aHflT ):{enOM, TO HeKor):{a nnaKaTb. EaHpoH My weekday On my weekdays I usually wake up at 7 o'clock in the morning. The alarm- clock rings and I get out of bed. I go to the bathroom. Then I do my morning exercises and get dressed. My breakfast is on the table. Mother has already made it. She gets up earlier and cooks breakfast. After it I leave for school. It takes me 10 minutes to get there. My classes start at hall past eight. I usually have five or six lessons every day except Saturday and Sunday. By two o'clock I'm free. I go home and have dinner. Usually my friend gives me a call and we go for a walk. I like these walks, because we can chat about trifles and enjoy the weather. At these moments I feel happy and come home in good spirits. I am ready to do my homework. I spend about two hours on it. I know that about half an hour later my mother will come and I go to the kitchen to make the meal for my parents. They like it. After work they feel tired and the table on which their meal is ready makes them smile. I like such pleasant moments. Certainly I do some other house work: cleaning, washing up, ironing and so on. In order to have a loving family, each person must do his part. We are friends and all decisions we make together. (What to buy, where to rest, what friends to invite on this or that occasion.) My school-mates often come to our place. They like my parents. Some- times they stay with us to have a cup of tea. We talk, watch TV and discuss some news. In the evenings and mornings we spend some time in the open air walking our dog Spotty. MOM pa6o'lMM AeHb B 6YAH1-1 s:I 06blYHO npOCblnalOCb B 7 yaCOB yTpa. 3BOH1-1T 6YA1-111 bH1-1 K, 1-1 s:I nOAH1-1MaIOCb c nOCTel1. s:I AY B BaHHYIO. 3aTeM s:I Ael1alO 3ap51AKY, OAeBaIOCb. Mot1 3aBTpaK - Ha CTOl1e. MaMa Y>Ke np1-1rOTOB1-111a ero. aHa BCTaeT paHbwe 1-1 rOToBT 3aBTpaK. nOCl1e SToro SI YXO>KY B WKOI1Y. Ha AOPOry B WKOI1Y Y MeHs:I YXOA1-1T 10 M1-1HyT. YpOK Ha1-1HaIOTCs:I B n0I10B1-1He AeBs:lTOro. Y MeHs:I 06blYHO ns:lTb 1-1111-1 weCTb YPOKOB Ka>KAblt1 AeHb, KpoMe cy660Tbi 1-1 BOCKpeCeHbs:l. K ABYM yaCaM SI 6blBalO cB060AeH. AY AOMOt1 1-1 06eAalO. 06blHO MO APyr 3BOHT MHe, 1-1 Mbl 1-1AeM ryllS1Tb. MHe HpaBs:lTCs:l aT nporyl1K, nOToMY YTO Mbl MO>KeM npOCTO TaK n06011TaTb 0 nycTS1Kax 1-1 nOPaAOBaTbCs:I xopowe norOAe. B TaKe MOMeHTbl s:I 6blBalO caCTllB  B03BpaLltalOCb AOMO£:1 B npeKpaCHOM HaCTpoe- H. s:I rOTOB AellaTb YPOK. Ha aTO YXOAT ABa Yaca. s:I 3HalO, YTO epe3 nOl1- aca npAeT MaMa,  s:I AY Ha KYXHIO nprOTOB1-1Tb Al1S1 pOATel1et1 YTO-H- 6YAb noeCTb. M aTO oeHb HpaBTCS1. nOCJle pa60Tbi OH YYBCTBylOT ce6s:1 YCTaBWM1-1, L1 BA CTOI1 a , Ha KOTOpOM A1151 H1-1X rOTOB Y>K1-1H, 3aCTaBl1S1eT X Yl1bI6HyrbCS1. MHe HpaBs:lTCs:I TaKe np51THble MHyTbl. KOHeHO, 51 BblnOl1HSlIO 1-1 APYrylO pa60ry no AOMY: y60PKY, MblTbe nOCYAbl, rJla>KKY 1-1 T. A. lIT06bl ceMbSl 6bl11a APY>KHOt1, Ka>KAblt1 AOl1)1(eH BHOCL1Tb CBOIO l1enTY. Mbl - APY3s:I, 1-1 Bce peWeH1-1s:1 Mbl np1-1HMaeM co06Llta (YTO KynTb, rAe OTAOXHyrb, KaKX APY3et1 npL1rl1aCL1Tb no TOMY 1-111 HOMY cl1yyalO). M01-1 APY3bs:l yaCTO npL1XOAs:lT K HaM AOMot1. M HpaBs:lTCSI MOL1 pOAL1Tel1. lI1HorAa OH OCTaIOTCS1 y Hac Ha yaWKY aS1. Mbl pa3rOBapBaeM, CMOTpM Tel1eB1-130p 1-1 o6CY>KAaeM HOBOCT1-1. YTpOM 1-1 BeyepOM Mbl HeHaAOl1ro BbIXOAM Ha YI11-1l\Y, YT06bl BblrYl1s:1Tb Hawy c06aKY CnOTTL1. Topics mI 
 S--4 ...  g 3. These words and expressions will help you to talk about your week-day: 1) Getting up: to take offl to put on my pyjamas, my shoes, my slippers, my pants, my socks/stockings, my trousers, a shirtl a blouse, a dress, a skirt 2) Washing: to use a sponge, a cake of soap, a towel 3) Having breakfast: to havel eat coffee, tea, milk, sugar, toast, bread, butter, bacon, eggs, a pie. Questions and answers: 1) When do you usually wake up on a week-day? 2) Who cooks your breakfast? 3) What work do you do in your flat? 4) Do you take a cold shower in the morning? 5) How do you travel to school? 6) Is your school far from your house? 7) What do you have for breakfast as a rule? 8) How long does it take you to get to school? 9) When do you have a break for lunch? 10) When do you get home from school? 11) What do you do when you get home from school? 12) Do you often watch T.V.? WORDLIST alarm-clock ['lo:mkl:)k] -- 6YALflllbHK bathroom ['ba:erum] -- BaHHaS1 certainly [Is:tnli] -- KOHe"lHO chat [tfret] -- 60flTaTb clean [kli:n] -- np6paTb comfortable ['kAmftbl] --YIOTHbIVi cook[kuk]--roToBTb decision [di'si3()n] -- peWeHI1e except [ik'sept] -- KpoMe feel tired [Ifi:l 'taid] -- "IYBCTBOBaTb YCTaJ10CTb free [fri:] --cB060AHbl give a call ['k=>:l] -- 3BOHTb go for a walk ['w:):k] -- ryllStTb. XOALt1Tb Ha nporyllKY fIB Topics I usually wake up at 7 o'clock in the morning. My mother does. I clean the rooms, wash up, iron and other things. Yes, I do 1 No, I don't. By bus. Yes, it is I No, it isn't. A cheese sandwich and a cup of tea. It takes me about ten minutes. At 12. At 3 o'clock. I have dinner, go for a walk, do my homework and in the evening I watch T.V. and go to bed. Yes, I do 1 No, I don't. invite [inlvait] -- nprllawaTb iron ['ain] -- rl1ap.lt1Tb it takes -- Tpe6yeTcSI occasion ['k e i3(  ) n] -- nOBOA, cJ1Y"Ia open air ['up()n t] --(OTKpblTblVI) CBe)Ki1 B03AYX part [po: t] -- 3A. J1enTa smile [smail] -- Yl1b16aTbcSI spirit ['spirit] -- HaCTpoeHe tear [tE] -- CJ1eaa trifle [traifl] -- nycTSIK wake up -- npocblnaTbcSI wash Up-MblTb nocYAY weekday ['wi:kdei] -- pa6o"lVI (6YAHt1) AeHb 
Respect should be earned by actions and not acquired by years. Wright YBa)l(eHUe 3aCfly>KUBaIOT p,enaMH, a He npMo6peTalOT c rop,aMH. PaKr My school Everyone must have an education. You can't do without it if you are going to live an honest life. All children begin to attend classes at the age of 6-7 years old. Their par- ents train them to get up earlier on weekdays and let them sleep in on the weekend. Doctors advise people to get up at the same time every day. School begins at half past eight. I like my school. It is a big 5-storey build- ing. It has all the necessary facilities for studies. On the ground floor there is a cloak-room where I leave my coat and hat. The gymnasium, the workshops, the director's (principal's) office are on the ground floor too. If you go upstairs, you'll find Literature and Russian classrooms, Biology and Physics laboratories, Mathematics and Geography classrooms on other floors. There are also classrooms for learning foreign languages where one can see up-to date facilities/special appliances, dis- plays, etc. We use it during classes and sometimes go there to work indepen- dently. There is a library on the second floor. We often go there to borrow books for our talks, because our textbooks don't always provide us with the neces- sary material. Besides we can find there different literature: fantasy and detec- tive novels. I must say that life in our school where we spend half of our time is very interesting. OUf director (principal) and teachers know our interests and hob- bies. So they often arrange parities, olympiads on different subjects and orga- nize excursions for those who like to travel and visit the monuments and histor- ical places. It's great fun when we travel for several days. In our school there are subject clubs. Many schoolchildren attend these clubs, set up experiments and do research. As for me '1 am a member of the chemistry club. Younger children sometimes stay on at school till 5-6 o'clock. They have dinner and tea there and do their homework. Certainly they have a rest during the daytime. They play in the school yard and go for walks. In the long break we have either a hot meal or a snack. I usually come home at 2 o'clock. MoSl WKona Ka>KAOMY eJlOBeKY H}')KHO 06pa30BaHe. 6e3 Hero Hel1b3 060t1TCb, eCl1 Bbl c06paeTecb )I(Tb eCTHoVl >K3HblO. Bce AeT Ha!t1HatOT XOA!t1Tb B wKony B B03paCTe 6-7 neT. POATeJ1 np- Yl4atOT !t1X BCTaBaTb paHbwe B 6YAHe AH!t1 VI n03B0J1IOT VIM nOAOJlbWe nocnaTb B BblxoAHble. Bpa'-lVi cOBerytOT BCTaBaTb B OAHO VI TO >Ke BpeM Ka>KAbiVI AeHb 3aH51TVl51 B WKOlle Ha'-lHatOTC51 B nOllOB1I1He AeB51Toro. MHe HpaBTc51 MOSI WKOJ1a. 3TO 60J1bWOe 5-3Ta>KHOe 3AaH1I1e. 8 WKOJ1e eCTb Bce Heo6xoAVlMoe 060pYAoBaHe AJ1S1 3aH51T. Topics mJ 
.,. r  -- ... !'I g fD] Topics Ha nepBOM STa>Ke - pa3AeBa11Ka, 51 OCTaB11511O 3AeCb CBO na11bTO  wan KY. CnopT3a11, MaCTepCKe L-1 Ka6HeT AL-1peKTOpa TO>Ke HaXOAS1TC51 Ha nep- BOM STa>Ke. EC11 Bbl nOAHML-1TeCb no 11ecTHe, TO HaAeTe Ha APyrL-1X STa>KaX Ka6HeTbl 11L-1TepaTYPbl, PyccKoro 513bIKa, 6L-10110rL-1L1  Q:>L-13L-1KL-1 C 11a- 60paTOpL-1S1ML-1, Ka6L-1HeTbl MaTeMaTL-1K L-1 reorpacpL-1L-1. ECTb TaK>Ke Ka6L-1HeTbl A11S1 L-13yeHL-1S1 L-1HOCTpaHHblx S13bIKOB, rAe MO>KHO YBAeTb cOBpeMeHHoe 060PYAOBaHL-1e, annapaTYPY, MOHL-1TOpbl L-1 T. A. Mbl n0I1b3yeMcS1 BceM STL-1M Ha YPoKax, a L-1HOrAa npL-1XOAM clOAa, T06bl n03aHL-1MaTbCS1 caMocTO,S1- Te11bHO. Ha BTOpOM STa>Ke pacn0I10>KeHa 6611OTeKa. Mbl aCTO XOAL-1M clOAa, T06bl B3S1Tb KHL-1rL-1 A11S1 CBOL-1X BblcTynJleHL-1 L-1 AOK11aAoB no npeAMeTaM, nOTOMY TO B Y4e6HL-1KaX He BcerAa XBaTaeT MaTepL-1a11a. KpOMe Toro, 3AeCb Mbl MO>KeM HaTL-1 pa3HYIO 11 L-1TepaTYPY: cpaHTaCTKY  AeTeKTL-1Bbl.  A011>KeH CKa3aTb, TO >K3Hb B Hawe WK011e, rAe Mbl npOBOAL-1M no- 110BHY Hawero BpeMeHL-1, oeHb HTepecHaS1. Haw ApeKTop  Y4L-1Te1151 3HalOT 0 Hawx HTepecax L-1 YB11eeHS1x. nOSTOMY OH aCTO YCTpaL-1BaIOT Be4epa, 011MnL-1aAbl no pa3HbiM npeAMeTaM, OpraHL-13YIOT SKCKYPC A11S1 Tex, KOMY HpaBL-1TCS1 nYTewecTBoBaTb  nOCeLl\aTb naMS1THK  cTop4e- CKe MeCTa. 3TO npocTo 3AOPOBO, KorAa Mbl nYTewecTByeM HeCK011bKO AHe. B Hawe WK011e eCTb K11y6bl no npeAMeTaM. MHorL-1e yeHL-1K L-1X nOceLl\a- lOT, npOBOA51T SKcnepMeHTbl L-1 3aHL-1MaIOTCS1 L-1CC11eAOBaHL-151ML-1. TO KacaeTCS1 MeH51, TO 51 XO>KY Ha 3aHS1T51 Xi-1Mi-1t.jeCKoro KJly6a. YeHK M11aAWX K11aCCOB i-1HOrAa OCTaIOTCS1 B wK011e AO 5-6 YaCOB. 3Aecb OHL-1 06eAalOT i-1 n011AHL-1aIOT, AeJ1alOT AOMaWHlO1O pa60Ty. KOHe4HO, AHeM OH OTAblxalOT. OH L-1rpalOT B WK011bHOM caAY  XOAS1T Ha npory11Ki-1. Ha 60J1bW0t1 nepeMeHe Mbl MO>KeM nepeKYCTb J1 noeCTb ero-H6YAb rop514ero.  06bl4HO npXO>KY AOMOt1 B ABa 4aca AHS1. Questions: 1) Why is it necessary to have an education? 2) When does compulsory education start in Russia / in England? 3) How long does primary education last in Russia? 4) At what age do Russian children begin going to school? 5) How old were you when you started school? 6) What form are you in? 7) Do you like going to school? Why? I Why not? 8) Tell us how you come to school. What street do you take? Do you turn left or right? Do you pass any traffic lights? 9) How far is it from your home to the school? 10) What can you borrow in your library? 11) Which of these subjects do you study at school? (Mathematics, English, Art, History, Physics, Biology, Sport, Music, Typing, Economics.) 12) What subjects are the most useful for you do you think? 13) What is your favourite school subject? 14) Which subject are you best at? 15) Which subject are you worst at? 16) At what age did you begin studying English? 0; 17) Was it at school or at home? 
18) Who was your first teacher? 19) What do you do at your English lessons? Do you like them? Why / Why not? 20) Are you good at English? 21) Do you sing English songs? Which one is your favourite? 22) Is it important nowadays to speak English? (Why?) 23) Do you like homework? Why? / Why not? 24) What are you going to do after finishing school? 25) What profession are you going to get? 26) Who helped you to make a decision about your profession? WORDLIST acquire [:;)'kwai:;)] - np06peTaTb appliance ['plai:;)ns] - annaparypa arrange [:;)'reincB] - YCTpaBaTb at the same time [seim Itaim] - B TO)l(e BpeMSI attend [:;)'tend] - noceaTb borrow ['b=>ru] - B3S1Tb (3aHSlTb) break [breik] - nepeMeHa certainly ['s:;):tnli] - KOHe"lHO cloak-room ['kl:;)uk rum] - rapAep06 (pa3AeBaJ1Ka) display [dis'plei] -AVlCnJ1e, MOHTOp education [.edju:'keiJ( )n] - 06pa30BaHLt1e excursion [iks'k:J()n] -3KCKYPCVlSl facilities [f:;)'silitiz] - 060PYAosaHe fiction ['fikJ(:;))n] - XYAO)l(eCTBeHHaSll1TepaTypa. 6eJ1J1eTpVlCTKa fun [fAn] - pa3BJ1e"leHe gymnasium [cBim'neizj:;)m] - CnOpT3aJ1 honest ['=>nist] - "IeCTHblt1, cKpeHHt1 independently [.indi'pendntli] - caMOCT05ITeJ1bHO provide [pr:;)'vaid] - 06eCne"l1-1BaTb research [ri's:;):tI1- HayYHoe CCJ1eAOBaHe respect [ris'pekt] - YBIDKeHe set up experiment [set Ap iks'perim:;)nt] - AeJ1aTb on bIT snack [snrek] -J1erKaSl3aKYcKa storey ['st=>:ri] - 3Ta)l( weekday ['wi:kdei] - pa60"li1 AeHb weekend ['wi:kend] - BblXOAHble workshop ['w:;):kJ p ] - MaCTepCKaSl Topics fIm) 
_ Topics Work done, have your fun. . Proverb CAel1aJ1 Ae110 - ryJ1S1 CMeI10. nOCJ10B Spare time Every day I go to school. I get up early, do homework, have piano lessons twice a week. But on weekends I like to do something different. I like to relax. I watch T.V. or videos. If it rains, I prefer indoor activities: to read books or newspapers, to' play chess, draughts or table-tennis, to practice woodcraft, to play records, to write some letters, to draw, to clean the house. In winter I like to watch Winter Olympics on T.V. I like to watch ski jumping, hockey and figure skating. As for my sister she likes to knit and sew. She takes an aerobics class on Sundays. In spring and summer I prefer outdoor activities: to do some gardening, to ride a bike, to go roller skating, to play volleyball and badminton. I like to go swimming and I go deep-sea diving. I like to go boating too. I go fishing and do a lot of photography. Of all outdoor games I prefer tennis. Playing tennis relax- es me. I'm not a good tennis player. In autumn I like to go to the cinema, to the theatre, to the concerts, to the library and art exhibitions. In winter I go skiing or skating..llike to play ice hockey. My sister likes figure skating. CBo6oAHoe BpeMR Ka>K.Qblt1 AeHb SI xO>t<y B WKOI1Y. S1 BCTalO paHo, Ael1alO YPOK, 3aHMa1OCb MY3b1K0t1 ABa pa3a B HeAel1tO. Ho B BblxoAHble AH Sl111061110 3aHHMaTbC51 yeM-HH6YAb APyrM. MHe Hpa- BTC oTAblxaTb. S1 CMOTplO TeJ1eB30p 1111111 BIIIAeo. ECI111 AeT AO>K)J.b. TO 51 npeAn04i11TalO nOAel1aTb 4TO-TO AOMa: n04HTaTb KH11rVl L-111H ra3eTbI, nOHrpaTb B waXMaTbl, waWKH 11H HacTol1bHbl TeHHL-1C, 3aHs:lTbC pe3b60 no AepeBY, nOCJ1ywaTb n11aCTiI1HKH, HanHcaTb ncbMa, nopHCOBaTb. CAeJ1aTb y60PKY B AOMe. 3M0t1 SI 111061110 CMOTpeTb 3L-1MHHe OJ1MnL-1CKe rpbl no Te11eB30py. MHe HpaBit1TC CMOTpeTb npbDKKit1 c TpaMn11HHa, XOKKe H <t>lI1rypHoe "KaTaHHe. TO KacaeTCSI Moe ceCTpbl, TO oHa I1106T B3aTb H WiI1Tb. no BOCKpeceHb- s:lM OHa XOAHT Ha aapo6HKY. BecHot1 111 JleTOM 51 npeAn04HTalO AellaTb TO-HH6YAb Ha CBe>KeM B03Ayxe: pa60TaTb B caAY, KaTaTbCSI Ha Bel1ocHneAe. pOI1KOBbIX KOHbKax, L-1rpaTb B B0l1et16011 L-1 6CiAM1IIHTOH. S1 111061110 nl1aBaTb  HblpTb. Ee  111061110 KaTaTbCs:l Ha 110AKe. fI 3aH1IIMalOCb PbI6HO 11oB11e 111 <t>oTorpacl>et1. 3 Bcex 1IIrp Ha CBe)t(eM B03Ayxe 51 npeAn04111TalO TeHHiI1C. rpa B TeHHHC ycnoKaHBaeT MeHs:I. S1 He 04eHb xOPOWVlt1 TeHHL-1CVlCT. OceHblO Sll11061110 XOAiI1Tb B KHHO, TeaTp VI Ha KOHepTbl, B 61116I1HOTeKY VI Ha BbICTaBKVI. 3HM0£1 SI KaTalOCb Ha l1bl>KaX L-111V1 KOHbKax. S1 111061110 HrpaTb B xOKKe£1. Mos:l ceCTpa 11106111T ct>rypHoe KaTaHe. 
 Questions and answers: 1) What do you like to do on week- :;; R. .... 1'1 ends? g 2) What are you going to do this weekend? 3) Are you a good swimmer? 4) What are you doing next Sun- day? 5) What will you do if it rains? 6) What sport do you like to do on vacation? 7) Can you play it well? 8) What does your sister like to do on weekends? 9) How much television do you watch every week? 10) What were you doing last night? 11 ) Did you like it? 12) What is your favourite outdoor game? 13) What is your favourite indoor game? 14) Who is the best chess player in the world? 15) Did you enjoy your vacation? 16) Did you have a good time on va- cation? 17) What do you hate doing? WORDLIST art exhibition [a:t ,eksi'bif()n] -xYAO>KeCTBeHHaSl BbiCTaBKa basketball ['ba:skitb:l] - 6aCKeT6oJ1 different ['difrnt] - pa3J11-1YHbI dive [daiv] - HblpSlTb draughts [dra:fts] - waWK draw [dr:] - pCOBaTb KapaHA(iWaM1-1 figure skating ['fig 'skeitilJ] - Q>1-1rypHoe KaTaHe football ['futb:l] - <J>yr6011 go cycling ['saiklil)) = to ride a bike - KaTaTbCSl Ha BeJ10CneAe go roller skating ('rul 'skeitil)] - KaTaTbCSI Ha POIU1KOBbIX KOHbKaX have piano lessons ['pjrenu] -3aHMaTbCSI MY3bIKO (c1>opTenViaHo) hockey ['hki] -xoKKe£1 ice skating ['ais 'skeitilJ) - KaTaHit1e Ha KOHbKax indoor activities ['ind: rek'tivitiz] - rpbl B nOMeL1leH I like to read. I also like watching T.V. I guess I'll spend the weekend swimming. I don't swim very well. But I like swimming. It relaxes me. It depends on the weather. I may take some pictures unless it rains. I guess I'll develop some film. I like to play volleyball. Yes, I can. / No, I can't. She likes to watch television and kn it. About two hours. I was watching a film on T.V. liked most of it. but not all of it. Swimming. Chess. I think Karpov plays the best. / I don't agree. I think Kaspa- rov plays better. No. I didn't. / Yes. I did. No. I didn't. Well. for one thing the weather was unpleasant. For another thing. the sea was rough. I hate cleaning the house. And I hate getting up early. knit [n it] - BSl3aTb Olympic games [{u)'limpik geirnz] -OJ1MnHM- CKe rpbl outdoor games ['autd: geirnz] - rpbl Ha OTKpbl- TOM B03Ayxe play chess [plei Itfes] - waxMaTbi play records [plei 'rek:dz] - nporpblBaTb MaCTHKH practice woodcraft ['prrektis 'wudkra:ft]- 3aHMaTbCSl pe3b60 no AepeBY prefer [pri'f:] - npeAnoHTaTb relax [ri'lreks] -OTAbixaTb, paCCJ1a6J1S1TbCSf sew [su] -WTb skate ('skeit] - KaTaTbCSI Ha KOHbKaX ski [ski:] - KaTaTbCSI Ha J1b1)Kax ski jumping [ski: t\)ArnpilJ] - npbl>KKH C TpaMnJ1Ha tennis [Iten is] - TeHHHC theatre ['eit] - TeaTp volleyball ['vlib:>:I] - B0J1e6oJ1 Topics SD 
BLJt B] Topics The first wealth is health. Emerson 3opoBbe - rnaBHoe 6oraTcTBo. oMepcoH Sport A lot of people never exercise. They often eat the wrong food as well. These people become unhealthy. In our family all of us are careful about our food and exercise a lot. My dad and brother run five kiloJ11etres every day. They are very healthy. They like swimming and running. My father doesn't drink any alcohol and he never smokes. My Mum and I do aerobics at the weekend. I always eat some fruit for breakfast: an apple and an orange. I eat a lot of vegetables, but I never eat any sugar. It's very bad for teeth. My brother does a lot of sports: swimming, cycling, yoga and jogging. He likes swimming, because it is good for the back. Cycling is good for the legs, and it's relaxing. Yoga is good for breathing. It's also very relaxing. Jogging is good for losing weight, and also very good for breathing. It's very good for the heart, too. I like tennis very much. Tennis is fun, and very exciting. It's very good for arms and legs. I like it a lot. CnopT MHore 11IOA HKorAa He 3aHMaIOTc51 cnopToM. K TOMY >Ke OH acTo eAT He TO, 4TO HClAO. TaKe 11IOA cTaHoBTc 60JlbHbIM. Y Hac B ceMbe Bce 04eHb BHMaTe11bHbl B oTHoweH nit1LU,it1  MHoro 3aHit1- MalOTcSJ cnopToM. Mo oTeu.  6paT np06eralOT e>KeAHeBHo no 5 Kit1JlOMeTpoB. Y HX npeKpacHoe 3AopOBbe. OH 11106T n11aBaTb  6eraTb. Mo oTeu. He nbeT  He KYPit1T. MaMa   3aHMaeMCS1 aap06Kot1 no BblxoAHblM. s:I BcerAa eM ct>PYKTbl Ha 3aBTpaK: S16110KO it1 ane11bCit1H. EM MHoro OBOLU,et1 it1 HKorAa He eM caxapa. OH 04eHb BpeAeH A11S1 3y60B. Mo 6paT MHoro 3aHMaeTCS1 cnopToM: n11aBaHeM, Be11ocneAoM, t1o- ro, 6eroM TPYCU.O. OH 11106it1T n11aBaHit1e, nOToMY 4TO aTo n011e3Ho A11S1 cn- Hbl. E3ATb Ha Be11ocneAe n011e3HO A1151 MbIWU. Hor. ora n011e3Ha All Ablxa- TellbHo CCTeMbl. 3aHTit1 orot1 ycnoKaBaIOT. An noxYAeHS1 xopowo 3aHit1MaTbCS1 6eroM TPYCU.O. 3TO TalOKe xopowo A11S1 nocTaHoBK npaBit111bHOrO AbIXaHit1S1. 3TO TalOKe nOlle3Ho  A11S1 CepAL.J.a. s:I 04eHb 111061110 TeHHit1C. TeHHit1c - aTO 3AOPOBO, aTO YB11eKalOUJ,aS1  3aXBaTbl- BalOUJ,aS1 rpa. OH n011e3eH AllS1 PYK  Hor.  MHe aTO HpaBit1TC. , 4. Act out the dialogue. A famous sports champion visited your school. What would you like to ask him/ her about? Speak to her/ him. 1) Do you belong to any sport society? 2) To what sport society do you belong? 3) Are you an Honoured Master of Sports? 4) How long have you been doing this sport? Who is your coach now? 5) Who was your first coach? 6) What is your favourite indoor game? 7) Are you good at tennis? 8) Who is your team playing next week? 9) Do you think your team will win? 10) What is your hobby? Have you got a family? 
r r--4 .... l't g Questions and answers: 1) Do you do a lot of sports? 2) How many sports do you do? 3) And what are they? 4) Why do you like cycling? 5) What kinds of sport are most popular among the young peo- ple in your country? 6) Do you like physical training classes at school? If uyes": What kind of activity do you prefer? If Uno": Why not? 7) What kinds of sport competitions are held in your school? 8) Are there any school champions in your class? 9) What sport does she/he do? 1 0) Is there any difference between your PT lessons in winter and in autumn? Say in detail. WORDLIST breathing ['bri:oiI)] - AblxaHe careful ['kcful] - 3a60TI1V1Bbl exercise ['ekssaiz] - 3aHMaTbC51 cnopToM health [helS] -3AopOBbe jogging ['cBgiJ)] - 6er TPYCLlO Yes, I exercise every day. Two. Jogging and cycling. Because it's good for legs, and I think it's relaxing and it's fun. Judo, gymnastics, fencing, bas- ketball, volleyball, tennis, football, swimming and ice hockey. Yes, I do. I prefer basketball and gymnastics. All kinds of competions are held in our school. Of all outdoor games I prefer basketball and badminton. No there aren't. / Yes, there are. Volleyball. Yes, there is. In winter we go skating and skiing. The boys like to play hockey. In au- tumn we play football, bas- ketball, and badminton. relax [ri'lreks] - paccl1a611S1TbC5I smoke [smuk] - KYPTb unhealthy [An'helSi] - He3AopoBbI wealth ['weI8] - 6oraTcTBo Topics fInD 
B Topics Tastes differ. Proverb o BKYCax He cnopRT. nocnOBl¥l My hobby Sometimes students ask this question: "What's your hobby?" But not ev- erybody has one and they say: "I like cycling, walking, listening to music, watching T.V., reading, talking to my friends." But a hobby is something like a habit, a pastime, when you devote all your time to it, you can't do without it. Some people don't like noise or a great number of people. After a hard they come home and have a rest sewing or knitting. A friend of mine likes to spend her free time sewing skirts, blouses, dresses. She can knit as well. Another friend likes to make everything with his own hands. He can repair: an iron, a radio-set, tape-recorder and what-not. Many boys and girls and grown-ups are fond of collecting old coins, post- cards and stamps. Some boys and girls are fond of listening to the short-wave bands on the radio. Here is a story about Peter's Hobby Peter is fond of listening to the short-wave bands on his radio. He likes to search for interesting foreign radio stations. When he discovers a new station he writes down the details in a note-book and marks the place on a large map of the world. Peter's cousin, Alan, is also keen on finding foreign radio sta- tions. In fact, Alan and Peter are having a competition to see who can find the largest number of different stations. Peter's mother occasionally complains about the noise, and one day his father turned off his radio because he was tired of the peculiar sounds that came from it. However, Peter's hobby helped to save someone's life last week. He was looking for new stations between the 19 and 16 metre bands when he came across a very faint signal in Morse Code, "SOS, SOS... Mary Jane... Position latitude 46° N, longitude 14° W... sinking fast... SOS." A yacht, the "Mary Jane," was in trouble in the Atlantic. Peter wrote down the details, then rang up the police and gave them the information. The police told the Navy and the Air Force about the message, and they were able to save the man. Apparently his boat had been damaged by a large piece of wood. The man decided to reward Peter for helping to save his life. Several days later Peter received a new radio, larger and more powerful than his old one. Moe xo66M HorAa yeHK 3aAalOT 80npoc: "KaKoe T80e ll106Moe 3aHSlTe?n Ho He y Ka>KAOrO OHO eCTb,  TorAa OHH rOBopSlT: "MHe HpaBli1TCSl KaTaTbCSI Ha Be110- cHneAe, rYJ1S1Tb, c11ywaTb MY3blKY, cMOTpeTb Telle8li130p, Yit1TaTb, 6011TaTb c APY3b5lM". X066H - STO KaK npBblYKa, TO, Ha YTO Tbl TpaTWb 8ce cBoe Bpe- MSI,  Tbl He MO)l(eWb 6e3 SToro 060TCb. HeKoTopble J1IOAH He nepeHocS1T WYMa 11 6011bworo CKOn/1eHSI /1IOAe. nOC11e TS1>Ke110rO TpYAoBoro AHSI OH npxOASlT AOMOti  oTAblxalOT, 3aHit1Ma- SlCb WTbeM ll BSl3aHeM. MoSl nOAPyra 11106T npOBOATb cB060AHoe Bpe- MSI 3a WbeM 106oK, 611Y30K, n11aTbeB. Ew.e aHa YMeeT xOPOWO BSl3aTb. A APyroti MOti APyr 11106V1T Bce AenaTb CBOVlM pYKaMlI1. OH MO)l(eT noY- HTb YTlOr, npeMHK Vll1 MarHTocpoH  Bce TO yroAHo. 
r"" -4 .... 1'1 gM MHore MaJ1bK, AeBO'-lK  B3pOCJ1ble YB/1eKaIOTCs:I K0/111eKu.OHiI1pOBa- HeM CTapblX MOHeT, OTKpblTOK  MapOK. HeKoTopble pe6s:1Ta /1106s:1T cllywaTb no P8AiI1o nepeAaiI1 Ha KOpOTKX BOllHax. BOT pacCKa3 0 nlO6MMOM 3aHSlTMM nMTepa nTep /1106T C/1ywaTb KOpOTKOBOJlHOBble nepeAa no paAO. EMY HpaBTCs:I /10BTb HTepecHble nporpaMMbl 3apy6e)l(HbiX paAOCTaHl.\. KorAa OH 06HapY>KBaeT HOSYIO CTaHl.\lO, Bce nOAP06HO 3anCblBaeT B 3ancHYIO KHiI1)1(KY  OTMe'-laeT MeCTO Ha 60/1bWO KapTe Mpa. A/1aH, ABOIOPOAHbl 6paT nTepa, TO)l(e YBJ1eKaeTCS1 nOViCKOM HocTpaHHblx pa- AOcTaHu.. Ha caMOM Aelle Me>KAY HVlM AeT CBoero pOAa copeBHOBa- He, KTO not1MaeT iI1X 60/1bwe. nopot1 MaMa nTepa )l(allyeTcs:I Ha WYM, VI OAHa>KAbl ero oTeu. BbIKllIOiI1/1 npeMHK, nOTOMY 4TO OH YCTall OT Cnel.\<I>VIecKX 3BYKOB I KOTopble 3AaBaI1 npeMHK. OAHaKO Ha npOWJlO HeAe/1e 3TO YB/1eeHiI1e nTepa nOMorno cna- CT1-1 '-IblO- TO )I(3Hb. OH JlOBll cTaHu. B Aana30He Me)I()J.y 19  16 MeTpaM  BAPyr HaTKHYl1Cs:I Ha oeHb C/1a6blt1 CVlrHaJl Ha a36YKe Mop3e: "SOS... SOS... M3pil1 A>Ket1H... MeCTOHaXO>KAeHiI1e 46° ceBepHo WpOTbl  14° 3anaAHo AOIlrOTbl... 6blCTpO norpY)l(alOcb... SOS". s:lxTa "M3p A>KeH" nonana B 6eAY B AT},aHTiI1eCKOM OKeaHe. n1-1Tep Bce aKKypaTHo 3anil1Call, 3aTeM n03BOHVI/1 B n0/1u.10  Aa/1 iI1M KOOPAHaTbl. nOl1l.\s:I C006Lltil111a Bce BoeHHblM Mop51KaM  IleT4KaM,  OH CMorn cnaCT '-IeI10BeKa. nO-BiI1AMOMY, ero CYAHO Ha- TKHynocb Ha 6011bW0t1 KYCOK AepeBa. 3T01 eJlOBeK peWiI1J1 BPYiI1Tb n1-1Tepy B03Harpa>KAeH1-1e 3a TO, TO OH no- Mor cnaCT ero >K1-13Hb. Lfepe3 HeCKOJ1bKO AHe n1-1Tep n0I1Y'-l1-111 HOBbl PaAVlO- npeMHVlK, 6011bwe  MOLltHee, eM ero CTapbl. . Questions and answers: 1) What do we call a hobby? 2) What hobbies do you know? 3) Have you got a hobby? What is your hobby? 5. Read and comment on it. Is it a good hobby to listen to this kind of music? "PMTMMlieCHMH TOHCMH03" yfiMBaeT nOAPOCTHOB (npeAynpe>KAaIOT aMepil1KaHCKe HepoxPypr) LlYAOBVILltHble rOI1OBHble 6011, 6eccoHHbie HO, pSOTa, <p3ecKoe iI1C- TOLlteHe. B 3TOM rOAY C nOXO>KM >Ka/106aMiI1 TbICs:I nOAPOCTKOB B POCC 06paT/1Cb K MeAKaM. Bpa npBbl'-lHO oTMaxBallcb - 3K0/10rs:I. Ho eCJlil1 He nO/1eHTbCs:I  3ar/1s:1Hyrb B cneu.aJlVl3pOBaHHble aMepVlKaH- CK1-1e HaY4Hbie >KYPHaJlbl, HeTPYAHO 06HapY>K1-1Tb - 3TOT CHAPOM }')Ke Tp rOAa cKPynYJ1e3HO 3Y'-laeTcs:I. ABa Hepoxpypra 3 /1/11-1HOCKOro YHBepcTeTa Aa/1 CVlHAPOMY MS1, KOTopoe Ha PYCCKVI MO)l(HO nepeBecT KaK "pTMe- CK TOKCK03n. 06bl4HO HOBaS1 60/1e3Hb nOpa>KaeT Tex nOAPocTKOB, KOTopble HeYMepeHHo C/1ywalOT non-MY3bIKy. np'-IeM CHAPOM Ha6JllOAaeTCs:I TOIlbKO y 6e11blx aMe- pKaHl.\es. 3BYKoBbie CVlrHaJ1bl, nOCJlaHHble B onpeAe/1eHHOM pTMe  onpeAe- /1eHHOM reM6pe, pa3PywalOT MMYHHYIO ccTeMY, KOTopaS1, KaK Vl3BeCTHO, Y 6e11blx 3HaTeJlbHO Ys:l3BVlMee, '-IeM Y acppo-aMepKaHl.\eB. A hobby is a favourite occupation of a person in his free time. Sewing, knitting, collecting coins, postcards and stamps. I like collecting stamps. Topics fmI 
non-MY3blKa CerOAHst 3an0110HsteT OK0110 90 npou.eHToB POCccKoro pa- A03<f>pa. K11nbl Ha uKBaApaTHble" Me110AIt1It1 CTaIllt1 eAIt1HCTBeHHblM Te11e3pe- 11eM, AocrynHblM B 111060e BpeMst AHst It1 HO. MY3blKa y6BaeT Hac Be3Ae: Ha Y/lit1LJ.e, B Mara3He, Ha pa60Te, B TpaHcnopTe. 111 He YBepHyrbCst,  He np- KpbITbCS1.. . Mbl peW/l nOCMOTpeTb Ha 3CTpaAY 6e3 p030BbiX OKOB.  TO Mbl YBAe- /l? He it1CKYCCTBO, He KY/lbrypa, Aa>Ke He rpa - B OCHOBe 3Toro >KaHpa. BeAb e>KeKBapTaflbHbl 060POT B MY3bIKa/lbHOM woy-63Hece Ha cero- AHWHit1 AeHb COCTaB/lS1eT 15 MIt1/l/l1t10HOB AO/l/lapOB - It1 3TO TO/lbKO B MOCK- Be. KorAa Ha KOHY TaKe AeHbril1, KTO CTaHeT 3a60TIt1TbCst 0 3AopoBbe HaLJ.iI1i11?! Bo BceM LJ.B/lil130BaHHoM Mlt1pe pa3BepHY/laCb 60j)b6a C MY3bIKa/lbHO YMO - nonco ABaAu.aToro BeKa. 8 nap>Ke, HblO-1I10pKe, 6ep11He 3TOT cypporaT CJlywalOT TO/lbKO B cneu.aJlbHO OTBeAeHHblX MeCTax.  WORDLIST Air Force [e f:>:s] - BoeHHo-B03AYWHblf1 apparently [Iprer(  )ntl i) - nO-BAMOMY band [brend] -Aana30H (0 PClAVIoBollHax) be fond of [fnd v] -J1106V1Tb be tired ('tai d] - 6b1Tb YCTaIlblM coin [k:>in] - MOHeTa come across [kAm 'krs] -3A. YCJ1b1WaTb competition Lkmpi'tif(  )n] - copeBHoBaHe complain [km'plein] - >KaIlOBaTbCSI cousin [kAzn] - ABOIOPOAHbl 6paT cycle [saiki] - e3ATb Ha Bell0cneAe damage ['drem iet] - nOBpeATb, yw.ep6 devote [di'vut] - nOCBSIaTb discover [dis'kA v] - 06Hapy>KVlBaTb, OTKpblBaTb faint [feint] - clla6bl favourite ['feivrit] -11106V1Mbli1 free [fri:] - cB060AHbli1 give the information Linf'meif()n] -C006VlTb Hcf>opMau.VlIO grown-up Lgrun'Ap] - B3POCJ1bli1 habit ['hrebit] - npBbl"'lKa hard [ha:d] -TPYAHbl however [hau'ev] - OAHaKO, TeM He MeHee in fact [frekt] - B caMOM AeJle, AeCTBTeJ1bHO iron ('ain] - YTlOr keen [ki:n] -YBlleKalOLt1i1cSI gm Topics knit [n it] - BSl3aTb latitude ('lretitju:d] - wpOTa longitude ('I:>ncBitju:d] - AOJ1rOTa make smth with one's hands - AellaTb "'ITO-ll60 CBOM PYKaM mark [m a: k] - OTMeifaTb. AeJ1aTb 3aMeTK message ('mesicB] - co06eHe Navy ('neivi] - BoeHHo-MopcKoi1 noise [niz] - WYM note-book ['nutbuk] -3anCHaSl KH>KKa occasionally ['kei3nlli] - CJ1Y'-1aHO, peAKO peculiar [pi'kju:lj] - cneu.cf>ifecKi1 position [p'zif(  )n] - MecToHaxO)I(JJ.eHe powerful ['pauful] - MOHblf1 receive [ri 'si:v] - nOJ1Y"'laTb repair (ri'pe] - ifHTb reward [ri'w:d] - HarpClATb ring up (ril)] (rang, rung) - n03BOHTb save [seiv] -cnacaTb search [Is:m -1-1CKaTb, OTblCKIilBaTb sew [sU]-WTb sink [sil)k] -TOHyrb tape-recorder ['teip ri'k:d] - MarHTocf>oH trouble [trAbl] - 6eAa turn off [t:n :f] - BblK/llOifaTb yacht U:>t] -SlXTa 
Art is long, life is short. Proverb )/(U3Hb KOpOTKa, UCKYCCTBO Be4HO. nOCJ10BLt1 Theatre and cinema Theatre is a wonderful combination of arts. Cinema is a marvellous invention of the 20th century. At theatres people can see dramas, tragedies, comedies, operas, ballets, puppet-shows and other performances. Many great playwrights in the world wrote plays which were staged at the- atres all over the world. In England the greatest of them was William Shakespeare (1564-1616). He wrote 37 plays. Many of them, namely "Othello", "King Lear", "Hamlet" and others are being staged in many countries .even today. Later on in the 19th century two other playwrights became famous - Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) and George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950). Even now people greatly enjoy G. Shaw's play "Pygmalion" which is very popular in many coun- tries. At the same time in Russia many theatres in different cities and towns stage wonderful plays written by Gogol, Ostrovsky, Chekhov and many, many other authors of the past. At our marvellous opera and ballet theatres - the Bolshoi in Moscow and the Mariinsky in St. Petersburg people can listen to wonderful operas and see brilliant ballets. Up to now Tchaikovsky's operas and ballets such as "Eugene Onegin," "Sleeping Beauty" and Musorgsky's opera "Boris Godunov," have been a great success in our country and abroad. The spectators of theatre performances admire everything, including first- class acting of actors and actresses, fascinating scenery and costumes, beautiful music, voices and dances, curious plots and surprising work of the producers. And what about cinema which has already celebrated its hundredth anniversary? It is really one of the greatest inventions. It gives knowledge, education, pleasure and entertainment to cinema-goers on our planet. There are thou- sands of films for children, students and grown-ups produced in all countries. There are: feature films, history films, documentaries, science films, news- reels, animated cartoons and others. Originally all the films were only black and white and silent films. Nowadays all of them are sound and most of them are coloured. Cinema-goers admire the art of scriptwriters, producers, operators, marvellous acting of favourite actors and actresses. TeaTp M KMHO TeaTp - npeKpacHoe COeTaHiI1e t1CKYCCTB. KiI1HO - YAiI1BiI1TeJ1bHOe iI1306peTeHiI1e XX BeKa. " B TeaTpax J1IOA MOryr nocMoTpeTb ApaMbl, TpareA, KOMeA, 6aJ1eTbl, nocllywaTb onepbl, YBAeTb KYKollbHble cneKTaK11  APyre npeACTaBlleH. MHoril1e BeJ1Ke ApaMarypril1 Mpa ncall nbeCbl, KOTopble 6bl/l no- CTaB11eHbl B TeaTpax Bcero Mpa. B AHr11t1 Be114at1wM 1113 H1I1X 6bl11 Y1I111bS1M WeKcnp (1564-1616). OH Hancall 37 nbec. MHOrt1e t13 HiI1X - "OTe1111o", "KOPOllb Jlt1p'J, "raMlleT"  APyre CTaBT BO MHorx cTpaHax  no ce AeHb. n03AHee, B XIX BeKe, ABa APyrx ApaMarypra CTa11t1 3BeCTHbIMt1: OCKap YallbA (1854-1900)  A>KopA)K 6epHapA Woy (1856-1950). V1 B Haw AH Topics mJ 
J1tOA HaCJ1a)f(AaIOTCS1 nbeco 6. Woy unrMaJ1OH", KOTopaS1 He06blaHo nonYJ1S1pHa 80 MHorx cTpaHax. 8 TO )l(e 8peM 8 Pocc cerOAH MHOrL-1e TeaTpbl 8 pa3HbiX ropoAax CTa- 8T npeKpacHble nbecbl, HancaHHble rOrOJ1eM, OCTP08CKL-1M, Yex08blM L-1 MHO- rt-1M-MHorL-1ML-1 APyrL-1ML-1 nL-1CaTellM npow/loro. B HaWL-1X 8ellL-1KOllenHblX TeaTpax onepbl  6aJ1eTa - 8 6011bWOM B MOCKBe  MapL-1HCKOM 8 CaHKT-neTep6ypre - lllOAL-1 MOryr nocllywaTb npeKpaCHbie onepbl L-1 YBLt\QeTb 3aMeaTellbHble 6aI1eTbl. it1 8 HaWL-1 AH onepbl L-1 6aI1eTbl '1aKoBcKoro uEBreH OHerL-1H", "CnaS1 KpacaBua", onepa MycoprcKoro "60pL-1C rOAYHOB" nO/lb3YIOTC5I orpOMHblM ycnexoM 8 Hawe CTpaHe L-1 3a py6e>KOM. 3pL-1Tell TeaTpa.nbHblx cneKTaKlle BOCXL-1w.aIOTC5I BceM: nepBOK1laCCHO L-1rpo aKTepOB L-1 aKTpc, L-1CKYCHbIM AeKopau.5IMH Lt1 KOCTIOMaML-1, npeKpac- HO MY3bIKO, rOllocaMH aKTepOB H TaHLJ.aM, 3aHL-1MaTellbHb1MH CIO>KeTaMH H 611ecTS1w.e pa60To pe>KHCCepoB. A KaK HaceT KHHO, KOTopoe }')Ke OTMeTH110 C80 CTOJleTHt1106.ne? 3TO AeCTBL-1Tel1bHO OAHO H3 BellL1aWL-1x H306peTeHH. KL-1HO o6pa30BbI- BaeT L-1 pa3Bl1eKaeT 3pL-1Tel1e Bce nl1aHeTbl. 80 Bcex cTpaHax CHL-1MaIOT TbIC5I- VI <t>l1bMOB AJ1 AeTet1, MOllOAe>KVI L-1 83pOCl1b1X. 3TO xYAO>KeCTBeHHble, CTO- pecKe, AOKYMeHTallbHble, HaYHo-nonYl1pHble <pL-1J1bMbl, KL-1HO>KYPHal1bl, MYl1bTL-1nllVlKau,L-10HHble <t>t-111bMbl lt1 APyrVle. CHaaJla Bce <t>l1bMbl 6blllVl TOllbKO epHo-6eJ1ble lt1 HeMble. Ceac 8ce OH 38YKoBbie L-1 60/lbWHCTBO L-13 HL-1X - LJ.BeTHble. KL-1H03pL-1TellL-1 BOCXL-1LltatOT- CS1 CKYCCTBOM cu,eHapL-1CTOB, pe>KCCepoB. onepaTopoB, 3aMeaTel1bHo L-1r- po J1106L-1MbIX aKTep08 L-1 aKTpL-1c. .,. r_  S- .... l't g Questions and answers: 1) What performances can people see in the theatre? People can see dramas, trage- dies, comedies, operas, bal- lets, puppet-shows and oth- er performances. I like opera best of all, because I like music very much. Yes, I go to the cinema every week on Saturdays. Feature films are very bright and beautiful. That's why I prefer to see them. 2) Which of them do you like best? 3) Do you often go to the cinema? 4) Do you like to see black and white or feature films? WORDLIST abroad ['b f3:d] - 3a rpaHu.et1 admire [d'mai] - BOCXIl1Li\CiTbC animated cartoon ['renimeitid ka:'tu:n] - MYJ1bT- ct>1I1J1bM anniversary Lreni'v:sri] - rOAOBHa await ['weit] - >K.QaTb. O)f(II1AaTb be staged [steicBd] - 6b1Tb nOCTaBJ1eHHblM cinema-goer ['sinimgu] - KLt1HOapit1TeJ1b combination [.kmbi'neif( )n] - COeTaHlI1e curious ['kjUfis] - J1106onbiTHbI, 3aHMaTeJ1bHbI entertainment Lent'teinmnt] - pa3BJleeHe fascinating ['fresineitil)] - BellKOllenHblt1 feature ['fi:tf  ] - XYAO)f(eCTBeHHblt1 invention (in'venf(  )n] - t-1306peTeHe newsreel ['nju:zri:l] - KHO)f(YPHaJ1 mJ Topics originally ['ricBnli] - CHa"laJ1a, nepBOHaaJ1bHO performance [p'f:>:mns] - npeACTaBlleHe, CneKTaKJlb playwright ['plei rait] - ApaMarypr pleasure ['pIe 3:;) ] - YAOBOllbCTBe, HaCllIDK.D.eHi-1e plot [plt] - CIO>KeT produce [pr'dju:s] - (no)cTaBTb, CHs:tTb (0 <J>J1bMe) producer [pr'dju:s] - npOAlOcep, pe>Kccep puppet show ['PApit fu] - KYKOllbHOe npeACTaBJ1e- He scenery ['si: n  ri] - AeKopau.lI1i11 science ['sains] - HaY1.fHblt1 scriptwriter ['skript,rait] - cueHapcT silent ['sailnt] - HeMo spectator [spek'teit] - 3pTellb 
Gratitude is a sign of noble souls. Aesop 6naro.o.apHoCTb - 3HaK 6naropo.o.CTsa. 330n Environmental Protection Suppose you get out of your house on an early sunny April day and see... uOh, what is it?" It is a yellow dandelion. It looks at you from the ground and says U Protect me, please." Do you know how much Russian people like it? The poet Anna Akhmatova and writer Vladimir Soloukhin devoted their verse to it. Faberge, a famous Rus- sian jeweller, made a sophisticated figure of a. dandelion. Our land is full of beautiful flowers, plants, trees which grow and blossom in the meadows, on the banks of the rivers and lakes, in the forests and in our gardens. Many flowers have become rare and vanish. Our useful insects: bees, bum- ble-bees, butterflies, dragonflies, grasshoppers can't live in the atmosphere of chemicals and pesticides. Excessive radiation and transport are harmful to people and animals. But industry is developing sometimes without any care of the environ- ment. We know that a great number of people all over the world are taking part in the policy of controlling the atmosphere, the water, the climatic changes, because of man's interference in nature. These problems become very pressing, the subject of many scientific meetings. Let everybody remember: we live only once and not a very long life. We have one earth for all those who love it and who do not. 3aMTa OKPY)l(alOeM cpeAbl npeAn0110>KM, liTO Tbl BbIXOAlt1Wb 3 AOMa paHHM cOl1HeHbiM anpeJ1b- CKiI1M AHeM  BiI1AiI1Wb... "0, liTO 3TO?" 3TO >Kel1Tbl OAYBaHiI1K. OH CMOTpil1T Ha Te6S1 CH3Y  fOBO- pit1T: u3aLU,Tit1 MeHS1, nO>Kal1ycTa". 3Haewb 11 Tbl, KaK pyccKe J1106S1T ero? n03Tecca AHHa AxMaToBa it1 nLt1ca- Tel1b Bl1aAMit1p C0110YXH nOCBS1TiI111it1 eMY CBOil1 CTxoTBopeHS1. ct>a6ep>Ke, iI13BeCTHbl PYCCK IOBel1it1p, c03Aal1 3b1CKaHHoe YKpaweHe B BAe OAYBaH- iI1Ka. Hawa 3eMl1S1 lt1306i1111yeT KpaClt1BbIM u.BeTaM, pacTeHS1M, AepeBbSlMiI1, KOTopble pacryr lt1 u.BeTYT Ha llyrax, no 6eperaM peK it1 03ep, B Jlecax  ca,Qax. MHoril1e l\BeTbl CTMit1 peAKMit1 it1 C4e3aIOT. Hawit1 nOlle3Hbie HaceKOMble: n4el1bl, wMel1, 6a60Kit1, CTpeK03bl, KY3He4K He MOryr )I(Tb B aTMoc<t>epe, Hacblw.eHHo XMKal1it1S1M  neCTit1u.AaM. nOBblweHHaS1 P8Aau.iI1S1  TpaH- cnopT OKa3blBalOT speAHoe B03AeCTBL1e Ha 111OAe it1 >KLt1BOTHbIX. Ho npoMblWlleHHOCTb pa3BiI1BaeTCS1, He 3a60TS1Cb iI1HorAa 06 oKPY>KalOw.e cpeAe. Mbl 3HaeM, TO OyeHb MHoro I1IOAe BO BceM Mpe Y48CTBYlOT B KOHTpOJ1e 38 4CTOTO 8TMoc<t>epbl, BOAbl, KJ1MarL14eCKX 3MeHeH, npocxoAS1W.Lt1X it13-3a BMeW8re11bCTBa 4ellOBeKa B >Klt1BYIO nppOAY. 3T np0611eMbl cr8HOBS1TCSl 04eHb HaCYLU,HbIML1, OH cTaHOBSlTCS1 npeAMe- TOM 06cY)l(AeHS1 MHorOClleHHbIX HaY4HbiX KOH<t>epeHu.. nYCTb Ka>K)J.bl nOMHLt1T - Mbl >KL-1BeM TOl1bKO pa3 iI1 COBceM HeAOl1fo.  y Hac eCTb TOllbKO oAHa 3eMJ1S1 Ha Bcex:  AllS1 Tex, KTO J1106T ee t.1 KTO - HeT. Topics gm 
"'r -- .... :!..III g Questions and answers: 1) Why have many flowers become rare and vanish? Industry is developing without any care of environmental pro- tection. Chemicals, pesticides, transport, radiation do harm to insects. 2) What does harm to insects? WORDLIST blossom ['bI3Sgm] - u.BeCTVI bumble-bee ['bAmblbi:] - WMellb butterfly ['bAtflai] - 6a60Ka care [kEg] - 3a60TVlTbCSI chemicals ['kemik( g )lz] - XIi1MIi1KaJ1li1V1 dandelion ['drendilain] - 0AYBaHYIi1K dragonfly ['drreggnflai] - cTpeK03a earth [:e] - 3eMl1S1 environmental protection [invaigrn'mEntl pr'tekf( g )n] - 3aTa oKpyalOe cpeAbi grasshopper ['gra:s,hpg] - KY3HeYK gratitude ['grretitju:d] - 6J1arOAapHocTb harmful [tho: m ful] - BpeAHbl industry ['indstri] - npOMbIWJ1eHHOCTb insect ['insekt] - HaceKOMoe interfere [.int'fi] - BMeWIi1BaTbCfl jeweller ['c3u:gl] -IOBeJ1li1p meadow ['medgu] -J1yr meeting ['mi:til)] - BCTpea, c06paHeJ KOH<t>epeH- U.1i1S1 noble ['ngubl] - 611aropoAHbl pesticide ['pestisaid] - necTu.VlA protect [pr'tekt] - 3aaTb rare ['reg] - peAK remember [ri'memb] - nOMHTb scientific [,sain'tifik] - HaYYHbI sign [sain] -3A. npLt13HaK sophisticated [s'fistikeitid] - CKYCHbI, 3b1CKaH- HbI suppose [s'puz] - npeAnOJ1araTb take part in - npHIi1MaTb yYaCTe B vanish ['vren if] - ce3aTb verse [v:s] - CTIi1X 8m Topics 
It is much easier to be critical than to be correct. Disraeli flerl/e KPUTUKOBaTb, l/eM '-ITO- TO c.n.enaTb npaBunbHO caMOMY. AVl3pa3J1 Why must technology bring apology to ecology? To answer this question we must first of all learn the meaning of the word "ecology". Ecology is a science which studies the relationship between all forms of life on our planet with its environment. This word came from the Greek "oikos" which means "home." This idea of "home" includes the whole planet of ours, it's population, the Nature, animals, birds, fish, insects, all other living beings and even the atmosphere around our planet. Do all of them live a happy and healthy life in our Home nowadays? Unfortunately, it is not so. Indeed, many territories, water basins, lakes, rivers, seas, oceans - and the atmo- sphere are polluted with all kinds of technological, agricultural, chemical, nu- clear and other wastes. The intensive development of sciences, industry and chemistry in the 20th century has made the pollution of our environment a glo- bal problem which should be solved by all means. Besides, rapid growth of our population (there are about 6 billion people living on our planet now) needs more and more land, food, goods and modern conveniences for newly-born people. The production of them in large amounts will greatly increase the pollution of the environment. And what to say about the awful harm caused to our Home by nuclear tests, atom bombs and acci- dents at our atomic power stations? Isn't it high time to start solving this global problem and to make our life in our Home happy and healthy? Now you know the answer to the question of why technology must bring apology to ecology. You are right. Because it has polluted and is badly pollut- ing our environment. And in conclusion all of us should always remember the wise advice of a great English writer John Galsworthy who said: "If you don't think about the future you will not have it. II nO'leMY TeXHonOR1S1 AOJDKHa M3BMHMTbCSI nepeA 3KonomeM? lfT06bl OTBeTTb Ha 3TOT Bonpoc, npe>KJ].e Bcero HaM HY>KHO Y3HaTb 3Ha4e- He c110Ba "3Ko11orSI". 3Ko11orSI - 3TO HaYKa, KOTopaSl 3Y4aeT B3aMOOTHO- weHSI Bcex <t>OpM >K3H Ha Hawe n11aHeTe c oKpY)KalOw.e cpeAo. 3TO C110BO npo30w110 OT rpeecKoro "oikos", 4TO 03Ha4aeT "AOM". 3TO nOHS1Te "AOM" BK11IOaeT BCIO Hawy n11aHeTY B u.e110M, ee Hace11eHe, nppoAY, Bce BAbl >KBOTHbIX, nTu., Pb16, HaceKOMblX  APyrx >KBbIX cyw.eCTB, nppoAY  Aa>Ke aTMoc<t>epy BOKpyr Hawe n11aHeTbl. Bce 11 OH >KByr caCT11Bo  3AOPOBO >K3HblO ceroAHSI? K CO)l(a11eHIO, HeT. Ha caMOM AeJle, MHore TeppTop, BOAoeMbl, 03epa  peK, MOpS1  OKeaHbl  B03AYX CJlbHO 3a- rpSl3HeHbi pa3114HbIM TeXHo11or4ecKM, CeJlbCKOX03S1cTBeHHbIM, XM- ecKM, S1AepHbIM  APyrM oTXOAaM. CTpeMTe11bHoe pa3BTe HaYK, npOMblw11eHHocT  XM B XX BeKe cAe11a11o 3arpS13HeHe OKpY)f(aK>w.e cpeAbl r1106a11bHo£:1 np06JleMO, KOTopaSl A011)1(Ha 6blTb peweHa BO 4TO 6bl TO H cTa11 0 . KpoMe Toro, 6bICTPbl£:1 POCT Hace11eHS1 (Ha Hawe£:1 n11aHeTe ceac )f(BeT OK0110 6 M1111apAoB e11oBeK) Tpe6yeT 6011bwe 3eM11L1, nw., TOBapoB  cOBpeMeHHblx YA06cTB M51 HOBblX nOKo11eH. npO3BOACTBO Bcex TOBapoB  Topics fiB 
YCJ1yr B 60J1bWX KOJ1L-1yeCTSaX 3HaYTeJ1bHO YBeJ1L-1YL-1T 3arpSl3HeHL-1e OKpY>KalO- ll.\e cpeAbl. A TO YYr< rOBopTb 06 Y>KaCHOM speAe, KOTOPbl HaHOCSlT HaweMY AOMY L-1CnbITaHL-1SJ SJAepHoro oPY)l(iI1SJ, aTOMHblX 60M6  aBap Ha aTOMHblX SJ1eKTpOCTaH51x? He nopa J1 HaaTb pewaTb STY rJ106aJ1bHYIO np06J1eMY  CAeJ1aTb Yr<iI13Hb B HaweM AOMe CaCTJ1i11S0  3AOPOBO? A Tenepb Bbl 3HaeTe OTBer Ha Bonpoc "nOyeMY TeXHOllOrL1S1 AOJ1>KHa 3B- HTbCfI nepeA SK0J10ret1?". BepHo. nOTOMY LITO OHa 3arpfl3HJ1a L-1 Bce ell.\e npOAOJ1)f(aeT CJ1bHO 3arp513H51Tb Hawy OKp}')KalOll.\YIO cpeAY. i-1 B 3aKJ1lOeHe, Ka)f()J.bl 3 Hac AOJ1Yr<eH BcerAa nOMHTb MYAPblt1 COBeT BeJlKOrO aHrJ1L.1VtCKOro nL.1CaTeJ151 AYr<oHa rOJ1cyopCL.1, KOTOPblVt CKa3aJ1: "EC/lil1 Bbl He AYMaeTe 0 6YAYll.\eM, TO Y Bac ero  He 6YAeT". -,  ...  g Questions and answers: 1) What does the word "ecology" mean? 2) What pollutes water basins, lakes, rivers, seas oceans and many land territories and the at- mosphere? 3) What must we do to make our life happy. healthy and benefi- cial? WORDLIST accident ('reksidnt] -aBapSI advice [d'vais] - COBeT agricultural [,regri'kAltfr(  )1] - CeJ1bCKOX03S1£1cT- BeHHbl£1 amount [Imaunt] - KOJlYeCTBO apology ['plcBi] - 3BVlHeHe atmosphere rretm,sfi ] - aTMoccI>epa, B03AYX atomic power station ['t::>mik Ipau 'steif()n]- aTOMHaSl3J1eKTpOCTaHu.L1S1 awful ['::>:ful] - \f)KaCHbl£1 basin ('beisn] - BOAoeM beneficial Lbeni'fifl] - 6JlarOTBOpHbI billion ('biljn] - MJlJlapA by all means [:I mi:nz] - BO YTO 6b1 TO H CTaJ10 cause [k:z] - npYHSlTb century ('sentfuri) - BeK chemical ['kemik(  )1] - Xit1MYeCK£1 chemistry ('kemistri] - XMSI conclusion [kn 'kl U:3(  ) n] - aaKJ1lOyeHit1e convenience [kn'vi:njns] -YA06cTBO development [di'velpmnt] -pa3BTe ecology [i:'k::>lcti] - 3K0J10rVlSl environment [in'vair(  )nmnt] - oKpY>KalOLl\aSl cpeAa global ['glubl] - rJl06aJlbHbl£1 Greek [gri:k] - rpeecK1-1£1 growth [Igrue] - pOCT m.J Topics Ecology is a science which studies the relationship between all forms of life on our planet with its environment. . They are polluted with all kinds of technological. agricultural. chemical, nuclear and other wastes. We must start solving the global problem of ecology. harm [ha:m] - BpeA, YLl\ep6 healthy ['heI8i] - aAopoBbI£1 include [in'klu:d] - BKIllOyaTb increase [i n 'k ri:s] - YBeJ1L1Yit1BaTb industry ['indstri] - npOMblWJ1eHHOCTb insect ('insekt] - HaceKOMoe intensive [i n 'tensiv] - HTeHcBHbl£1, CTpeMit1TeJ1bHbli1 living being ['livilJ 'bi:ilJ] - >KBOe CYLLleCTBO meaning ['mi:nilJ] - 3HaYeHe Nature ['neitf] - nppOAa nowadays ['naudeiz] - B Hawe BpeMSI nuclear ('nju:kl i] - SlAepHbI£1 pollute [p'lu:t] - 3arpSl3HSlTb pollution [p'lu:f(  )n] - aarpSl3HeHVle population Lppju'leif()n] - HapOAOHaCeJleHe production [pr'dAkf( )n] - np01-13BOACTBO rapid ['rrepid] - 6b1CTPbli1 relationship [ri'leif(  )nfip] - B3ait1MOCBSl3b, B3aMO- OTHoweHVle science ['sains] - HaYKa solve [slv] - pa3pewaTb technological Ltekn'Ictikl] - TeXH0J10rYeCKi1 technology [tek'nlcBi] - TeXHOJlOrit1S1 territory ['terit( )ri] -TeppTopSI test [test] - cnbITaHe wastes ['weists] -OTXOAbl wise [waiz] - MYAPbI£1 
Rome wasn't built in a day. Proverb He cpa3Y MocKBa crpounaCb. nOC110BVI(.\a Moscow The best way to see a strange city is to buy a map and a guide-book. Then I think, you should follow the recommended sightseeing routes. Certainly, that is not enough to study the city well. If someone would like to learn more about a city, it is useful to walk along the streets and look around to see historical places, buildings and monuments. There is no doubt that you should visit art galleries and museums. Besides this, you may ask a resident of the city to advise you what places of interest you should see first. Moscow, the capital of Russia, is one of the largest cities in the world. It stands on the bank of the Moskva River. About ten million people live in the city. Moscow is famous for its historical and architectural monuments that were built by the outstanding architects and sculptors: Kazakov, Bazhenov, Bove, Mikhailov, Martos, Opekushin and others. The best starting point of the tour around the city is Red Square, the central and the most beautiful square in Moscow. It is the place of parades, meetings and demonstrations. Here one can see the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed, or St. Basil's cathedral, erected by architects Postnik and Barma to commemorate Russia's conquest of the Kazan Kingdom in 1552. It is a masterpiece of Russian architecture. Tourists can see the monu- ments to Minin and Pozharsky. It was designed by Ivan Martos in 1818 in memory of the Russian victory over the Polish invaders in 1612. The History Museum in Red Square is a magnificent building besides, it is one of the major scientific and educational institutions where we can follow the life of Russian people since ancient times. The heart of Moscow is the Kremlin, a wonderful architectural ensemble with three magnificent cathedrals, the Bell Tower of Ivan the Great, palaces, fortress walls and 20 towers. On the five tops of the Kremlin towers one can see shining ruby stars. The clock that strikes every quarter of an hour is on the Spassky Tower. The Kremlin with golden domes and towers attracts every- body's attention and makes a strong impression on tourists and guests of the capital. The Alexander Garden is situated near the Kremlin wall. In 1967 the Memo- rial architectural ensemble was set up over the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There are always a lot of flowers at the foot of the monument, especially on Victory Day. Some skyscrapers decorae Moscow, including Moscow University where young people from different parts of our country and abroad study. Moscow is a scientific and cultural centre where there are lots of institutes, universities, libraries, museums, technical schools, colleges and secondary schools. The city leads a varied cultural life. It has a lot of cinemas, clubs, concert halls, more than 40 drama and musical theatres, including the Bolshoi Theatre with its famous world ballet and opera, the Art Theatre, The Maly The- atre, the Vakhtangov Theatre and others. Muscovites are proud of their museums: the Tretyakov Gallery, the Muse- um of Fine Arts named after A. S. Pushkin, the Kuskovo museum and Ostanki- no serfs Art Museum, Kolomenskoye, literary museums and art galleries. At the Tretyakov Gallery one can see a lot of remarkable paintings by the outstanding Russian artists: Repin, Kramskoy, Ivanov, Serov, Perov, Topics f.lm] 
Em] Topics Phedotov, Levitan, Vasnetsov, Shishkin, Polenov and others. Crowds of peo- ple visit the Tretyakov Gallery admiring beautiful pictures. At the Museum of Fine Arts there are masterpieces by the great European painters: Rubens, Van Gogh, Henri Matiss, Pablo Picasso, Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, Rembrandt, Botticelli, John Constable and others. Muscovites are fond of going in for sports. So, there are lots of stadiums, swimming-pools, sportsgrounds and courts. The biggest stadium is in Luzhni- ki. It is a green park with many sports facilities: a swimming-pool, a palace of sports, a skating-rink, tennis courts and other sportsgrounds. Moscow was the host of the 22nd Summer Olympic Games in 1980. By that time the Olympic Village, a lot of hotels and sportsgrounds had been built. The central stadium in Luzhniki had been reconstructed. The citizens of Moscow enjoy spending their weekends in parks, forests, gardens, for example in the Park of Culture and Rest, in Izmailovo, Sokolniki, Fili and others, where one can see amateur actors, films, go boating and ride on different attractions. By the 50th anniversary of the end of the Second World War a memorial had been erected on the Poklonnaya Hill. It has a museum and a monument of Nika, the Goddess of Victory. Besides, the monument to Zhukov, the outstanding military commander, has been set up in front of the History Museum. Certainly Moscow is worth seeing. MOCKBa Jlyw cnoc06 OCMOTpeTb He3HaKoMbl ropOA - 3TO KynVlTb KapTy VI nYTe BOAVlTeJ1 b. nOcJ1e SToro, nO-MoeMY, HY)l(HO CJ1eAOBaTb peKOMeHAOBaH- HblM MapwPYTaM OCMOTpa AocTonpMeaTeJ1bHOcTet1. KOHeHo, 3Toro He- AOCTaTOHO AJlS1 Toro, T06bl xopowo Vl3YVlTb ropOA. ECJ1 KOMY-TO 3axoeT- CS1 Y3HaTb 0 ropOAe 60J1bWe, n0l1e3HO npot1T no Yl1V1u.aM neWKOM, T06bl oc- MOTpeTb VlCTopVleCKVle MeCTa, 3AaHVlS1 VI naMS1THVlKVI. HecoMHeHHo, 8aM HY>K- HO nOCMOTpeTb XYAO>KeCT8eHHble ral1epeVi VI MY3eVl. KpoMe Toro, 8bl MO>KeTe nonpOCTb MeCTHoro >KVlTel1SJ nOC08eTosaTb, KaKVle AOCTonpVlMeaTel1bHOCTVI OCMaTp8aTb 8 nep8YlO oepeAb. MocK8a, CTOl1V1ua POCCVI, - OAH Vl3 caMblX KpynHblx ropoA08 MVipa. OHa paCn0110)l(eHa Ha 6epery MOCK8bl-peKVI. nOTVI AeCS1Tb MVll111VlOH08 ellOBeK )I(8eT 8 ropoAe. MocKBa 3HaMeHVlTa CBOVlMVI VlcTopVlecKVlMVI VI apxVlTeKTyp- HbIM naMS1THKaM, KOTopble 6b111 nocTpoeHbl 8bIAalOw.VlMVlcS1 apxVlTeKTopa- M VI cKYllbnTopaMVI: Ka3aKo8blM, 6a)l(eHOBblM, 60Be, MVlxat11108bIM, MapTO- COM, OneKYWVlHblM VI APyrMVI. HaVlHaTb OCMaTpBaTb ropoA llywe Bcero C KpacHot1 nllow.aAVI - caMo KpacBot1  ueHTpallbHot1 nllow.aA B MocKBe. 3TO MecTo, rAe npoBoAS1TCS1 napa.D.bl, MVlTVlHr VI AeMoHcTpauVlVl. 3Aecb Bbl MO)l(eTe Y8V1AeTb co6op BacVI- 1lS1 611a)l(eHHOrO, B03ABHrHyrbl 30AHMVI nOCTHKOM VI 6apMO 8 03HaMeHO- BaHe 3a80e8aHS1 Pocce Ka3aHCKoro xaHCT8a 8 1552 rOAY. 3TO weAeBp PYCCKO apxVlTeKTypbl. TYPHcTbl MOryT YBVlAeTb naMS1THVlK MVlHVlHY  nO>Kap- CKOMY. OH 6blll C03AaH BaHoM MapTocoM B 1818 rOAY B naMSJTb 0 no6eAe PYCCKVlX HaA nOl1bCKVlMVI 3aXBaTVlKaMVI B 1612 rOAY. cTopVlecKt1 MY3e Ha KpacHo nl1ow.8AVI - BellKOJ1enHOe 3AaHe. KpoMe Toro, 3TO OAHO 3 rl1a8- HblX HaYHblx  06pa30BaTeJ1bHblX ype>KAeHVI, rAe Mbl MO>KeM n03HaKOMVlTb- CS1 C >K3HblO PyccKoro HapoAa, HaYHaS1 c ApeBHx BpeMeH. CepAue MocKBbl - KpeMllb, 3aMeaTeJ1bHblt1 apxTeKTYPHbl aHCaM6J1b C TpeMS1 BeJ1KOl1enHbIMVI co6opaM, KOlloKollbHet1 8aHa BellViKoro, A80pua- 
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Questions and answers: 1) What are the most beautiful masterpieces of Russian archi- tecture in the city? 2) Where do you like to spend your free time? 3) What is your favourite theatre in Moscow? r r- ... !'t g 4) When was Moscow founded? 5) What is your favourite place in Moscow? . 6) What Pushkin places in the city do you know? 7) What park do you like to visit? WORDLIST amateur ['remt] - J1106TeJ1bCK, Henpo4>eccVlo- Hal1bHbli1 anniversary Lreni'v:sri]- rOAOBUJ.VlHa architect ['a:kitekt] - apXVlTeKTOp architectural ensemble La: ki'tektf(  )rl] - apXVlTeK- 1YPHbli1 aHCaM6J1b at the foot of - Y nOAHO)l(S1 be worth seeing ['w:e 'si:it)] -CTOT nocMoTpeTb citizen ['sitizn] - )I(TeJ1b college ['klic\)] - KOJ1J1eA>f(, Bblcwee yye6HOe 3aBe.o.eHe commemorate [k'memreit] - 6blTb nOCBS1UJ.eHHbIM YeMY-J160, 03HaMeHOBaTb YTo-J160 conquest ['kl)kwest] -3aBoeBaHe, nOKopeHe court [k:t] - KOpT decorate ['dek:}reit] - YKpawaTb design [di'zain] - npOeKTpOBaTb dome [dum] - KynOJ1 erect [i'rekt] - B03ABraTb, coop}')KaTb facility [f:}'Siliti] -060Py.o.OBaHVle, 3.0.. (cnopTBHoe) COop}')KeHVle fortress ['f:tris] - KpenocTb gallery ['gre] ri] - rMepeS1 go boating ['butil)] - KaTaTbCS1 Ha J10AKe go sightseeing ['sait,si:it)] - OCMaTpVlBaTb AocTonp- MeYaTeJ1bHOCT goddess ['g:Jdis] - 60rHS1 guide-book ['gaidbuk] - nyreBo.o.VlTeJ1b include [in'klu:d] - BKJ1IOaTb institution (.insti'tju:f(:})n] -yYpe>KAeHe, 3aBeAe- HVie invader [in'veid:)] -3axBaTYK map [mrep] - KapTa masterpiece ('ma:stpi:s] - we.o.eBp outstanding [.aut'strendil)] - BbIAalOUJ.VlL:1cS1 Polish ['pliJ1- nOJ1bCK1I1 recommended [.rek'mendid] - peKOMeHAyeMbiM em Topics I think the Moscow Kremlin and St. Basil's Cathedral. I like to go to the theatre. I like music very much, that is why the Bolshoi Theatre is my fa- vourite one. Moscow was founded in 1147. Arbat. know the museum in Arbat (Pushkin and his wife lived in that house in 1831) and the church of Ascension where Pushkin and Goncharova were married. I like the old park "Sokolniki." reconstruct [.ri:kn'strAkt] - nepeCTpaBaTb resident ['rezid(  )nt] - nOCTOS1HHblM >KTeJ1b Rome [rum] - P1I1M route [ru:t] - Mapwpyr ruby ['ru:bi] - Py6H sculptor ['skAlpt] - CKyJ1bnTOp secondary school ['sek(:} )nd(:} )ri sku:l] - Cpe,lJ.HS1S1 WKOJ1a shining [,fai ni!)] - cBepKalOUJ.i1 skyscraper['skai,skreip] - He60cKpe6. BblCOTHoe 3AaHVle sportsground ['sp:J:tsgraund] - CnOpT1I1BHaS1 nJ10w.aAKa stadium ['steidjm] - CT(iAViOH strange (streincB] - He3HaKoMbiM strike [straik] (struck, struck) - 6Tb (0 yacax) swimming-pool ('swimil) pu:]] - 6accet1H the Alexander Garden - A11eKCaHAPOBCK CaA the Bell Tower of Ivan the Great- K0J10K0J1bHS11-1BaHa BeJ1Koro the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed [k'ei:dr()] v snt 'bresil O 'blesid] - C060p BaCl1S1 6J1a>KeHHO- ro the History Museum ('hist(:) )ri mju(: rzim] - 1-1cTOpVlYeCKM MY3eM the Kazan Kingdom ['kil)dmJ -Ka3aHcKoe xaHCTBO the Olympic Games [(u)'limpik geimz]- OJ1Lt1M n1l1i1cKLt1e 1I1rpbl the SpasskyTower (Itau] -CnaccKaS16awHS1 the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier ['tu:m :)v O 'An'n:}un 'sulcB] - MOr1l1J1a He3BecTHoro COJ1AaTa tower [Itau] - 6awHS1 university [ju:ni'v:siti] -YHBepC1l1TeT Victory Day ['vikt( )ri dei] -AeHb n06e.o.bI weekend ['wi:kend] - BpeMS1 OTAbixa C nS1THu.bI AO nOHeAeJ1bHKa.BblXOAHble 
Handsome is as handsome does. Proverb KpaCUB TOT, KTO KpaCUBO nocrynaeT. nOCJ10BVI The Tretyakov Gallery One of the best traditions in Russia was investing in culture by those whose activity was in some other field. Pavel Tretyakov and his brother Sergei were Russian merchants. They had some factories and were successful in their trade. The love for art began growing in the brothers when their parents bought an old house in Tolmachi, the place considered by the visitors as one of the most beautiful in Old Mos- cow. Moscow was famous for its blooming gardens and a great number of churches arrayed by golden or silver domes and crosses. According to foreign visitors' accounts the sparkle of colours reflected by this lIairy" city made Mos- cow the only town having no likeness to those of Europe. Tretyakov carried the love for Moscow through his whole life. At the age of 20 he visited the Hermitage in St. Petersburg and was enchanted by the col- lection of world famous paintings there. He often visited art exhibitions in Rus- sia and abroad. Being a well-to-do merchant he decided to found a national gallery for Russian people. It was in 1860. "I have a great desire to make a storage of fine arts which will be useful and pleasant for my people." His broth- er shared his idea. Tretyakov was very strict in selecting pictures. Thus, old paintings and icons were the subject of his collection. He began to buy pictures from the Peredvizhniki and in the 80,s he supported the young generation of artists. They were Levitan, Serov, Korovin, Nesterov and others. Tretyakov was very careful in choosing the place for his pictures for them not to loose their beauty. He himself could varnish the paintings and do some restoration work. . The icons were collected in a home church. Now the icons are held in spe- cial gallery storages, some of them are shown to people from time to time. After the reconstruction in 1995 the Gallery became a very large art place. Here the visitors can see Andrei Rublev's Trinity (1422-1427), masterpieces of the 18th and 19th centuries. Among the painters whose works are exhibited in the Gallery we would like to mention I. Kramskoi (1837-1887). His portraits of Leo Tolstoy, Nekrasov and an "Unkown woman" attract great attention. I. Levitan (1860-1900) was famous for his landscapes. Being fond of Russian nature he reproduced it in paintings well-known and dear to everybody. Kuindzi, Aivazovski and Levitan founded a school of realistic landscape painting. I. Repin (1844-1930) was greatly influenced by Kramskoi. One of Repin's pictures was UThey did not expect him." V. Serov (1865-1911). In his childhood he was taught by Repin. Then Lev- itan, Surikov and Vrubel taught him the technique of colours, the value of re- sponding to a personal emotional experience. He became a very famous artist. His paintings "Girl in Sunlight," "Girl with Peaches" made him known in the world. V. Surikov (1848-1916) is represented in the Tretyakov Gallery by his UBoiarynia Morosova" and UMenshikov at Beriozov, II IIMorning of the Execution of the Streltsy." He had a very deep interest in the history of Russia and is considered to be a historical artist. Topics _ 
liD Topics Many more painters are represented in the Gallery. Come and see! You are welcome at this museum! TpeTbRKOBCKaR ranepeR OAHO 1113 llYW1I1X TPa.Q1I1U.1I1 B POCC1I1111 6blllO TO. TO lllOALli pa3HbiX c<t>ep AeS1TellbHOCT1I1 BKJ18AbIBallLII CB01l1 cpeACTBa B pa3BLIITLlle KYllbrypbl. naBell TpeTbSlKOB 111 ero 6paT Cepre 6blllLII PYCCKM Kynu.aMLli. Y HLIIX 6blllO HeCKOllbKO <t>a6pLIIK, 111 X Aella B ToprOBlle WlI1I1 ycneWHO. OHLII nOYBCT- BOBaIlLII. TO X BlleeT K npeKpaCHOMY TorAa. KorAa pOATellLII Kynll CTa- pLIIHHbl AOM B T oIlMaax. nOceTLIITellLII CLIITaIOT. TO 3TO OAHO Lil3 caMblX npe- KpaCHblX MeCT B CTapo MOCKBe. MOCKBa 6bllla 3HaMeHLilTa CBOLIIMLII u.BeTyw,LIIMLli caAaMVI  MHO)l(eCTBOM u.epKBe, 06lIbHO YKpaweHHblX 301l0eHb1MLli LII cepe6pSlHbiMLII KynollaM1I1 LiI KpeCTaMLII. KaK ncallLII 3ae3)1(e HocTpaHu.bl, CBepKalOw,ee C1I1S1H1I1e SToro ICB03AYWHoro" rpa.Qa AellallO MOCKBY ropOAOM. He cpaBHLilMblM HLII C KaKLIIM B EBpone. TpeTbSlKoB npOHec ll1060Bb K MocKBe CKB03b BCIO CBOIO )l(LII3Hb. KorAa eMY 6blllO 20 lleT. OH noceTLIIIl 3pMVlTa)l( B CaHKT-neTep6ypre LII 6blll oapOBaH KOlllleKu.Llle KapTH, L113BeCTHbIX BceMY MLIIPY. OH yaCTO nocew,all XYAO)l(e- CTBeHHble BbICTaBK B POCCLII LII 3a rpaHLllu.e. OH 6blll COCTOSlTellbHblM Kynu.OM LII peWL111 OCHOBaTb AJlSI PYCCKLIIX IIIOAe Hau.L10HallbHYIO raIlepelO. 3TO 6blllO B 1860 rOAY. IC s:t oeHb XOYY C03AaTb xpaHLIIIlw,e AJlS1 npo3BeAeH L113S1LJJ.HbIX LIICKYCCTB, KOTopoe 6YAeT nOlle3HO 111 npLIITHO MoeMY HapoAY". Ero 6paT pa3- AellS1ll ero L1AelO. TpeTbSlKoB 6blll oeHb cTpor B Bbl60pe KapTH. nOSTOMY npeAMeTOM ero KOlllleKLJ.LIILII CTaIl KapTLIIHbl CTapHHbIX MacTepoB  LIIKOHbl. OH HaLlall nOKynaTb KapTHbl nepeAB1-1)1(HKOB  B BOCbM1-1AeCSlTbIX rOAax CTall OKa3blBaTb nOA- Aep)l(KY MOllOAOMY nOKOJleH1O XYAO)l(H1-1KOB. 3TO 6blll1l1 JleBLiiTaH, CepoB, Ko- pOBLIIH, HecTepoB 111 APyr1l1e. TpeTbS1KoB OLleHb npVlCTpaCTHO OTHOC1I1llCSJ K Bbl60PY MeCTa AJl KapTVlH. lfT06bl OH1-1 He TepSJll CBoe KpaCOTbl. OH caM Mor nOKpblBaTb KapTHbl J1aKOM 111 AellaTb peCTaBpaLJ.1-10HHYIO pa60ry. KOHbl 6blll1-1 co6paHbi B AOMawHe'1 u.epKB1-1. Tenepb KOHbl xpaHTC B cneu.LilaJ1bHbIX XpaHVlll1-1w,ax rallepe, HeKOTopble 1-13 HX BpeM OT BpeMeHLiI BbICTaBllSUOTCS1 AJlS1 nOKa3a. nOClle peKOHCTPYKLJ. B 1995 rOAY ranepeSJ CTalla OyeHb npeAcTaBVlTellb- HO. 3Aecb noceTTell MorYT YB1-1AeTb 1I1KOHY ICTp01l1LJ.a" AHApe Py6lleBa. weAeBpbl XVIII  XIX BeKOB. ' CpeALii aBTopoB KapTLIIH, YbLII pa60Tbi BblCTaBlleHbl B rallepee. HaM 6bl xore- 1l0Cb ynoMS1Hyrb V1. KpaMCKoro (1837-1887). Ero nopTpeTbl JlbBa TOllcToro. HeKpacoBa. ICHe3HaKoMKa" npBlleKalOT BHLilMaHLile. . JleB1-1TaH (1860-1900) 6blll 3BeCTeH CBOM ne'13a)l(aM. OH OyeHb ll1061l np1-1poAY 1-1 Bocnpo3BoAll STO B xopowo Vl3BeCTHbiX 1-1 AOpOr1-1X Ka)l(- AOMY KapT1-1Hax. KY1I1HA'K. ABa30BcKt1, JleBTaH C03Aall WKOllY xYAo)l(e- CTBeHHoro pean1-1CTYeCKOrO ne3a)l(a. Ha TBopecTBo . PenHa (1844-1930) OKa3all 60llbwoe BllLilS1He . KpaMcKo. OAHa 3 KapTH PenLilHa - ICHe >KAallLII". B. CepoB (1865-1911). B AeTCTBe ero o6yyall PenH. nOJOM JleBLIITaH. CYPKOB 1-1 Bpy6ellb 06yYal1 ero TeXH1I1Ke u.BeTa. Ba)l(HOCT1-1 06paw,aTbcS1 K J1YHOMY sMou.1-10HaJ1bHoMY onblry. OH craJ1 oeHb L113BeCTHbIM XYAO)l(HLIIKOM. Ero KapT1-1Hbl ICAeBywKa B COJ1HelfHOM cBeTa", ICAeBOYKa C nepCKaM1I1" CAena- n ero BceMVlpHO Lil3BeCTHbIM. 
B. CYPKOB (1848-1916) npeACTaBlleH B TpeTb5lKOBCKO ranepee KapTiI1- HaM "605lpbIH5I Mop030Ba", "MeHwiI1KoB B 6epe30Be", "YTpO CTpelleUKOVI Ka3HiI1". OH 04eHb rlly60Ko HTepeCOBanC5I cTope POCCiI1, l'1 C4i11TaeTC5I XYAOHl'1KOM-peanil1cToM. ElU,e MHoro APyril1x XYAOHLttKOB npeAcTaBneHbl B ral1epee. CXOAiI1Te Ltt no- CMOTpil1Te! A06po nO)l(anOBaTb B 3TOT MY3e! .,. r_  -- ....  g Questions and answers: 1) Do you often go to the museums or galleries? 2) Have you ever been to the Trety- akov Gallery. 3) What did you like best of all? 4) Is it better to have a guide or to visit a museum alone? 5) By whom was the picture "Swan Princess" painted? 6) By whom was the picture "Christ Appearing to the people" painted? WORDLIST abroad ['br:):d] - 3a rpaHltei1 activity [rek'tiviti] - AeSneJ1bHOCTb airy ['cri] - B03AYWHbli1 arrayed ['reid] -3A. 06JlbHO YKpaweHHbl attention ['tenf(  )n] - BHVlMaHe attract ['trrekt] - npVlBJ1eKaTb be fond of - J1106Tb, HpaBTbCSI bloom [blu:m] - u.BeCTVI careful ['k£ful] - BHMaTeJ1bHbl carry ['kreri] - npoHecT (0 lIYBCTBax) church [U :U1 - u.epKoBb commerce ['k:) m :s] - TOprOBJ1S1 consider [kn'sidJ -ClIViTaTb. nOJ1araTb, AYMaTb cross [k r:)s] - KpeCT culture ['kAIU"] - KYJlbTYpa . deep [di:p] - rJ1y60Ki1 desire [di'zai] - >KeJlaHe dome [dum] -KYnoJ1 (xpaMa) emotional [i'mufnl] - 3MOU.OHaI1bHbli1 enchant [in'tfa:nt] - OyapOBblBaTb exhibition [,eksi'bif(  )n] - BblCTaBKa expect [iks'pekt] - H(lAeSlTbCSI, O>KAaTb experience [iks'pirins] -onblT field [fi:ld] -06JlaCTb fine arts ['fain la:ts] - 3S1l1\Hble VlCKYCCTBa found ['faund] - C03AaBaTb, OCHOBbiBaTb from time to time - BpeMSI OT BpeMeHLi1 gallery ['grelri] - raJlepeSl garden [ga:dn] -Ca,Q generation [IeEe n  I re if(  ) n] - nOKOJ1eHVle golden ['guld( )n] - n030J10lleHHbli1 handsome ['hrensm] - KpacBbli1 hang [hrelJ] (hung, hung) - pa3BewBaTb I'm sorry. I don't go there often. Yes, I have. I liked the pictures of Shishkin. especially "The morning in the pine forest. It' It is better to have a guide. By Mikhail Vrubel, 1900. By Alexander Ivanov, 1837-1857. icon ['aik:)n] - VlKOHa industry ['indstri] - npOMblWJ1eHHOCTb influence ['influns] - BJ1SlTb invest [in'vest] - BKJ1a,QblBaTb merchant [lm:U"()nt] - KYneu. realistic [,ri'listik] - peaJIViCTiI1l1eCKi1 painting ['peintil)] - KapTHa peach (pi:tJ] - nepCiI1K pleasant ['pleznt] - npSlTHbI production [pr1 dAkf(  ) n] - npo3BoACTBO represent [.repri'zent] - npeACTaBJ1S1Tb reproduce Lri:pr'dju:s] - BOCnp0il13BOAVlTb restoration [.rest'reif( )n] - pecTaBpau.SI select [si'lekt] - Bbl6i11paTb share [,fc] - pa3AeJ1S1Tb (B3rJ1S1AbI. W\e) silver ['silv] - cepe6po sparkle [spa: kl] - 6J1ecK. CBepKaHVle storage ['st3:ricBJ - XpaHJ1V1l1\e strict [strikt] - cTporVli1 subject ['sAbcBikt] - npeAMeT successful [sk'sesf(u)l] -ycnewHbI€1, YAaIlHbl sunlight ['sAnlait] -COJlHeIlHbI CBeT trade [treid] -TOprOBJ1S1 support [S'p3:t] - nO.lJ.[\ep>KiI1SaTb teach ('ti:tf] (taught, taught) - YIIKTb technique [tek'ni:k] -TeXHVlKa value ['vrelju:] - ueHHOCTb varnish ['va: n in - J1aKVlpOBaTb visitor ['vizit] - nOCeTVlTeJ1b well-to-do - COCTOSlTeJ1bHbl wonder worker -IIYAOTBopeu. world famous ['w:ld 'feims] -BCeMiI1pHO Vl3BecTHbli1 . 11 KHHra Ans:l ..,TeHHs:I K y..,e6HHKY .C..,acTn. aHrn.-2) Topics EmJ 
_ Topics Seeing is believing. Proverb nyc.lwe O,l{UH pa3 YBl1lteTb, tleM eTO pa3 ycnblWaTb. nOCJ10Bu.a , St. Petersburg St. Petersburg, one of the most beautiful cities in the world, was founded by Peter the Great in 1703 and it was called so in his honour. The city is situ- ated on the Neva River and has become the "window" to Europe. It was built by the prominent European and Russian architects. St. Petersburg was the capital of Russia from 1712 till 1918. The Peter and Paul Fortress was built to protect the Neva banks from Swedish invasion. Later D. Trezzini, the famous Swiss architect. reconstructed the fortress. It became a prison. Now it is a museum. D. Trezzini erected the Peter and Paul Cathedral here, which is a masterpiece of architecture. Russian tsars were buried in it. St. Petersburg is an industrial, cultural and scientific centre. There are over 80 museums, about 20 theatres, exhibitions, clubs, a university, colleges, in- stitutes, schools, libraries and parks. The Pushkin Drama Theatre, the Bolshoi Gorky Drama Theatre, the Mariinsky Theatre of Opera and Ballet are pearls of the Russian art. In St. Petersburg there are a lot of parks and gardens where the citizens can spend their free time. The Summer Garden is the oldest and most fascinating park. Rare trees, bushes and flowers grow there. Beautiful marble statues made by Italian sculptors and a cast iron grille decorate the Summer Garden. There is a bronze monument to the prominent Russian fabulist Ivan Krylov (by sculptor Klodt) in the Summer Garden. The city is famous for its magnificent architectural ensembles of the 18-19 centuries. In St. Petersburg tourists usually start sightseeing from Palace Square, the largest and most beautiful one. One cannot help admiring the ensemble in Palace Square: the Winter Palace (built by Rastrelli) was the residence of Rus- sian tsars till the revolution. The Hermitage, one of the oldest art museums in Russia, occupies the Win- ter Palace and four other buildings. There one can see masterpieces of the outstanding artists: Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Rembrandt, Velazques and other unique works of art. The Russian museum is located in the Mikhailovsky Palace, designed by Rossi. Marvellous paintings of the famous Russian artists: Tropinin, Repin, Bryullov, Fedotov, Surikov, Serov, the works of sculptors: Rastrelli, Shubin, Antokolsky are exhibited here. The streets and squares in St. Petersburg are very beautiful. Nevsky Pros- pect is the main street of the city, where there are amazing buildings, shops, hotels and the remarkable Kazan Cathedral (by Voronikhin) with a colonade and monuments to M. Kutuzovand Barclay de Tolly. Here in the prospect one can see the magnificent building of the Admiralty (by Zakharov) and an ensem- ble of the Alexander Nevsky Lavra. Famous Russian writers, painters, compos- ers and actors were buried in the Lavra. The majestic palaces, cathedrals, churches and other buildings, built by famous architects, decorate St. Petersburg, such as: palaces of Stroga- nov, Vorontsov, Menshikov, Anichkov. the Triumphal Arch and St. Isaacs , 
Cathedral, erected by Montferrand. St. Isaak's Cathedral, one of the most beautiful cathedrals, from the observation place of one can see the pan- orama of the city. One cannot but forget to mention the Smolny Institute and the Smolny nun- nery, masterpieces of Rastrelli. Girls from aristocratic families studied and lived in the institute. A lot of bridges cross the Neva, the Fontanka, the Moika and the canals, but the Anichkov Bridge is the most beautiful one. S1. Petersburg inspired many of our great poets, writers, painters, sculp- tors, composers and actors. Much of the life and work of Lermontov. Griboye- dov, Pushkin, Belinsky, Glinka, Chaikovsky, Repin and Kramskoi was connect- ed with the city. Citizens, tourists and guests enjoy visiting the suburbs of S1. Petersburg: Petergof, Pushkin, Pavlovsk, Lomonosov with wonderful palaces, parks and fountains. Welcome to St. Petersburg and its suburbs to get acquainted with their amazing sights! CaHKT-neTep6ypr CaHKT-neTep6ypr, OAH 3 KpacBe£1wx ropOAOB Mpa, 6blJ1 OCHoeaH neTpoM BeJ1KM B 1703 rOAY  Ha3BaH TaK B ero lteCTb. rOpOA pacn0J10>KeH Ha peKe HeBe  CTall "OKHOM" B EBpony. OH 6blll cnpOeKTpOBaH VI nocTpoeH BbIAaIOLUMcSI eaponet1cKVlMVI i1 PYCCKMi1 apXTeKTOpaM. CaHKT-neTep6ypr 6blll CTOJU1uet1 POCCi1 C 1712.0.0 1918 rOAa. neTponaBnoBcKa KpenocTb 6bllla nocTpoeHa, T06bl 3aLUVlTVlTb 6epera HeBbl OT WBeACKoro BTOp>KeHVlSJ. n03AHee A. Tpe3V1HVI, Vl3BecTHblt1 wBeuap- CKVI€1 apXI-1TeKTOp, nepeCTpOJ1 KpenocTb. OHa CTana TIOPbMO€1. Cet1ac oHa Bn5teTCS1 MY3eeM. 3AeCb)f(e A. Tpe3V1HVI B03ABVIr neTponaBll0BcKVI co6op, KOTOpbl S1BJ1eTC weAespOM 30AecTBa. PYCCKVle uapVl 6blJ1l-1 noxopoHeHbl B HeM. CaHKT-neTep6ypr - npoMblwlleHHblt1, KYllbTYPHbl VI HaYHbl ueHTp. 8 ropOAe CBblwe 80 MyaeeB, OK0J10 20 TeaTpOB, BbICTaBKVI, K1ly6bl, YHVlBepcVI- TeT, K0J111eA'KVI, VI HCTVll)'Tbl, WKOJ1bl, 6V16J1V10TeKVI VI napKVI. TeaTp ApaMbl VlMe- H A. C. nywKHa, 6011bW0t1 TeaTp ApaMbl I-1MeHVI A. M. rOpbKoro, Mapl-1V1H- CK£1 TeaTp onepbl VI 6aJ1eTa S1BJ1S1IOTCS1 )f(eMli}')KVlHaMVI pyccKoro I-1cKYccTBa. B CaHKT-neTep6ypre MHoro napKoB VI C(iAOB, rAe rOpO)f(aHe MOryr npOBO- ATb CBoe cB06oAHoe BpeMSI. JleTH£1 CelA - cTapet1w£1 VI caMblt1 npeKpacHbl£1 napK. TaM pacl)'T pe.o.KVle AepeBb5t, KycTapHVlKVI  LJ.BeTbl. KpaCVlBbie MpaMopHble cTaryVl, Vl3rOTOBneH- Hble VlTaJ1bS1HCKVlM MaCTepaM,  yryHHaS1 orpCiAa YKpawalOT lleTH C8)J.. 8 lleTHeM catJ.Y HaXOAVlTCS1 6POH30Bbl£1 naM5tTHK Vl3BecTHoMY PYCCKOMY 6acHo- nVlcLJ.Y It1BaHY Kpblll0BY (cKYJ1bnTOp KJ10AT). r OPOA 3HaMeHT CBOVlM BeJ1V1KOJ1enHbIMVI apxVlTeKrypHblMH aHCaM6115tMt-1 XVIII-XIX cTolleTH. B CaHKT-neTep6ypre TYPVlCTbl 06blHO Ha4HaIOT oCMaTpVlBaTb AOCTonpH- Mel.laTel1bHOCTVI C ABOPU,OBOH n110LUaAVI, caMot1 6011bWO VI KpacVlBo. HeJ1b3S1 He Bocxw.aTbC aHCaM6J1eM Ha ABOPLJ.OBO£1 nJ101l\8A: 3V1MH ABopeu (no- CTpoeHHbl£1 PaCTpeJ1J1V1) 6blJ1 pe3V1AeHLJ.l-1eCi PYCCKX LJ.apeC1 AO peSOJ1IOLJ.l-1t-1 apMTa)f(, OAH 3 CTapeWHX XYAO)f(eCTBeHHbIX MY3eeB B POCCVlVI, 3aHIo1- MaeT 3l-1MHl-1 ABOpeLJ.  ew.e eTblpe 3AaHVlst TaM MO)f(HO YSVlAeTb we.o.espbl BbIAaIOIl\VlXC XYAO>KHli1KOB: neOHapAO Aa BHHl.IH, Pacl>a3n5t, PeM6paHATa, Be- J1aCKeCa L-1 APyrHe YHKaJ1bHble npo3BeAeHSI CKYCCTBa. Topics SDD 
PYCCK MY3e pacnOl1araeTCfI B 6blBweM Mxa110BCKOM ABopue, no- CTpoeHHOM Pocc. TaM BblCTaBl1eHbl BOCXTTel1bHble KapTHbl 3BeCTHbIX PYCCKX XYAO)l(HKOB: TponHHa, PenHa, 6plO11110Ba, CYPKOBa. CepOBa. npO3BeAeHSI CKYl1bnTopOB: PaCTpel1l1. Wy6Ha. AHTOKOl1bCKoro. Yl1U.bl  nJ10aA B CaHKT-neTep6ypre OlleHb KpaCBbl. HeBCK npo- cneKT - rl1aBHa Yl1u.a ropOAa. rAe HaxOATC 3YMTel1bHble 3AaH, Mara- 3Hbl, rocTHUbl  npeKpaCHbl Ka3aHcK co6op CKYl1bnTOpa BOPOHxHa C K01l0HHaAO  naMflTHl1KaMl1 KyTy30BY l1 6apKl1alO Ae TOJ1J1. 3AeCb )l(e Ha npocneKTe MO)l(HO YBAeTb Bel1l1KOllenHOe 3AaHe A.D.Mpal1TecTBa. nocTpo- eHHoe 3axapOBblM.  apXTeKTYPHbl aHCaM61lb A11eKcaHAPo-HeBCKO l1aBpbl. B l1aBpe 6b11l noxopOHeHbl 3HaMeHTble PyccKe ncaTel1. XYAO)l(HK. KOM- n03Topbl  apTcTbl. Bel1ecTBeHHble ABOPL\bl. C060pbl. u.epKB l1 APyre 3AaHfI. nocTpoeH- Hble 3HaMeHTbIM apxTeKTopaM. YKpawalOT CaHKT-neTep6ypr: ABOPUbl CTporaHOBa, BOpOHUOBa, MeHWKOBa. AH1'1I1KOBa. TpYMQ:>aJlbHa51 apKa  lI1caaK1'1eBCK co6op, B03ABrHYTbl MOHQ:>eppaHOM. CaaK1'1eBCK Co- 60p - OAH 1'13 KpaCBewx C060POB. co CMOTPOBO nJ108AK1'1 KOToporo MO)l(HO YBl1AeTb naHopaMY ropOAa. Hellb351 He ynoMHyrb CMOJ1bHbl HCTl)'T 1'1 CMOJ1bHbl )l(eHCK MOHa- CTblpb - weAeBpbl PaCTpeJ1J11'1. AeBOIlK1'1 3 ap1'1CTOKpaT1'1l1eCKX ceMe 1'1- JlCb  )I(J1 .B CMOJ1bHOM HCTTyTe. MHoro KpaCBbIX MOCTOB nepeceKalOT HeBY. ct>OHTaHKY. MoKY  KaHaIlbl, HO caMbl KpaCBbl 3 HX - AHIIKOB MOCT. CaHKT-neTep6ypr BAOXHOBJ1 MHorx Hawx Bel1KX nOSTOB, ncaTel1e, XYAO)l(HKOB, CKYJ1bnTOpOB, KOMn03TopOB  aKTepOB. 6011bwafl aCTb )I(3HVI  TBopeCTBa 11epMOHTOBa. rp6oeAOBa, nYWKHa, 6el1HCKoro. rl1HK, aKOBCKoro, PenHa. KpaMCKoro 6blJ1a CB3aHa C STM ropOAOM. rOpO)l(aHe, TYPCTbl  rOCT ropOAa nOl1Y4alOT YAOBOl1bCTBe OT nocee- Ht1S1 npropOAOB CaHKT-neTep6ypra: neTeprOQ:>a, nYWKHa, naBJ10BCKa, 110- MOHOCOBa C t1X 3aMe4aTeJ1bHbIM ABopuaM, napKaM 1'1 Q:>OHTaHaM1'1. Ao6po nO)f(allOBaTb B CaHKT-neTep6ypr l1 ero npropOAbl, T06bl n03Ha- KOMTbC C X YABTel1bHbIM AOCTOnpl1Me4aTeJlbHOCTMt1! t \ 6. .Put your own questions to the text and answer them. WORDLIST an observation place Lbz:'veif( )n] - CMOTpOBaSl nno1J..MKCl amazing ['meizilJ] - 3YMTeJ1bHbI architectural La:ki'tekf(  )rl] - apxTeKTypHbl be founded ['faundid] -6blTb OCHOBaHHblM believe [bi'li:v] - BepTb, AOBepS1Tb - canvas ['krenvs] -XOllCT, n0J10THO (XYA.) cast iron grille ['ka:st 'ain Igrit] -lIyryHHaSl 0rpc3Aa contain [kn'tein] -cOAep>KaTb, BMew.aTb ensemble [a:nlsa: mbl] - aHCaM6J1b erect [i'rekt] - B03ABraTb fascinating ('fresineitil)] - ollapoBaTenbHblt1 figure (genre) painting ['fig 'peintiI)] - >KaHpOBble KapTi'1Hbl honour [':Jn] -lIeCTb inspire [in'spai] - BAOXHOBJlSlTb invaluable [in'vreljubl] - 6ecu.eHHbli1 em Topics invasion [i n 'vei3(  )n] - BTOp)l(eHe landscape ['lrenskeip] - ne3a>K magnificent [mreg'nifisnt] - BeJ1KOllenHbI, BeJ1lIeCTBeHHbI majestic [m'ctestik] - BeJ1lIeCTBeHHbI marble [ma:bl] -MpaMOp . masterpiece ['ma:stpi:s] - weAeBp panorama [,pren'ra:m] - naHopaMa pearl [p:I] - )l(eMlIY>KHa prominent ['pr:)minnt] - BbIAalOw.£1cSI scientific Lsain'tifik] - HaYlIHblt1 still life [stH 'laif] - HaTlOpMopT Swedish ('swi:diJl- wBeAcK Swiss [swis] - wBeu.apcK suburbs ['sAb:bz] - npLt1rOpOA, oKpecTHocT the Alexanc;ler Nevsky Lavra - A11eKcaHAPO-HeBcKaSl J1aBpa the Hermitage rh:mitict] - SPMTa>K 
Genius is one per cent inspiration and ninety-nine per cent perspiration. Edison B reHU8flbHOCTU 1 npOL(eHT BI1,OXHOBeHUR U 99 npOL(eHTOB TPYl1,a. 3AV1COH IL Y A REPIN lIya Repin is one of the most outstanding Russian artists. Repin was born in the town of Chuguyev in the Ukraine into the family of an officer in 1844. He showed his passion for painting in his early childhood there- fore he was sent to the art school by his parents. In 1864 Repin entered the Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg. Five years later he graduated from the Academy brilliantly. He got acquainted with I. N. Kramskoi, who noticed his talent, and joined Kramskoi's "Peredvizhnikilt. Among their members there were prominent ar- tists: Surikov, Perov, Makovskiy, Polenov, Savrasov, Vasnetsov, Levitan and others. This society played an important role in the painters' development. When Repin's picture "Barge-Haulers on the Volgalt was exhibited, it brought him fame and recognition. The painter exposes the oppression of people, showing their powerful forces and spiritual beauty of Russian people. We can see barge-haulers pulling _a barge up the river. They are exhausted by the inhuman labour. Repin devoted some paintings to the historical events of Russia,- for ex- ample: "Princess Sophia at Novodevichy Monasterylt, "A Religious Procession in Kursk Gubernialt, Ulvan the Terrible and his son Ivan on November 16, 15811t, "Unexpected Return" and others. People can't help admiring these wonderful canvases. Later the artist turned to another genre and painted portraits of common and famous people: "Mussorgskylt, "Stasovlt, "Tolstoylt, USerovlt, UPirogovlt, "Strepetova", "Rubinstein", etc. The portraits are not just talented reproduc- tions of some individual features, they are images of the world in which those persons lived. They are the pride of Russian art. Repin achieved great mastery in his painting. By the end of the century he gained wide public recognition and was made a professor at the Academy of Art. MnbSl PenMH 1I11lb PenH - OAHH H3 caMblX BbIAaIOLI..\XC PYCCKX XYAO)l(HHKOB. PenH pOAHIlC B ropoAe LlyryeBe Ha YKpaHe B ceMbe oQ>HLtepa B 1844 rOAY. Y Hero nOBllaCb crpacTb K pcoBaH1O B paHHeM AeTcTBe, no- 3TOMY pOATell nocJ1aJ1 ero B xYAo)l(eCTBeHHYIO WKOJ1Y. B 1864 rOAY PenH nocTynJ1 B XYAo)l(ecTBeHHYIO aKaAeM1O B CaHKT-neTep6ypre. nS1TblO rOAaM n03)1(e OH 3aKOH411 aK8AeM1O C OTJl4eM. OH n03HaKOMJlC C 111. H. KpaMcKM, KOTOPbl 3aMeTJl ero TaJ1aHT.  nocTynJ1 B 3BecTHYIO apTeJ1b KpaMcKoro unepeAB)I(HK". CpeA ero 411e- HOB 6blJ1 3BecTHble XYAO)l(HK: CYPKOB, nepOB. MaKOBcK. nOJ1eHOB. CaBpacOB. BacHeu.OB. JleBTaH  APyre. 3TO cOAPy>KecTBO rpallo Ba)l(HYIO pOJ1b B CTaHOBJ1eH XYAO)l(HKOB. KorAa 6blJ1a BbICTaBJ1eHa KapTHa PenHa "6YPJ1aK Ha BOJ1re", OHa np- HeCJ1a eMY CJ1aBY H np3HaHe. XYAO)l(HK 06J14aeT yrHeTeHe J1IOAe. nOKa- 3blBaS1 CJ1Y  AYXOBHYIO MOb pyccKoro HapOAa. Mbl BAM 6YPllaKOB, KOTO- pble TS1Hyr 6ap>KY BBepx no peKe. OH 3MoTaHbl HenOCJ1bHbIM TPYAOM. Topics B 
PenH nOCBstTl1 HeKOTOpble CBOJl1 KapTiI1Hbl CTOp4eCKM C06bITstM POC- C, HanpMep: "L.J.apeBHa CO<l>bst B HOBOAeBiI14beM MOHaCTblpe", "KpeCTHblii XOA B KYPCKOii ry6epH", "BaH rp03Hbiti iI1 CblH ero BaH 16 Host6pst 1581 rOAa" , "He >KAan"  APyre. JlIOA He MOryr He BOCXLltaTbCst 3TML-1 npe- KpaCHblMiI1 n0J10THaM. n03AHee XYAO)l(HK 06paTl1Cst K APyrOMY >KaHpy  pil1COSall nopTpeTbl npoCTblX VI 3BeCTHbIX 11IOAet1: "MycoprcK", "CTacos" t "TOllCTOt1", "CepOB" t "nporos", "CTpeneTOBa". UPy6HwTet1H"  APyre. nOpTpeTbl - He TOllbKO TaJlaHTllL-1BOe BocnpO3BeAeHe HeKOTopblX L>1HABAYaJlbHbIX epT, OH stBllst- IOTCSt OTpIDKeHeM Toro Mpa, B KOTOpOM 3T JlIOA )f(Vlll. OHL>1 rOPAOCTb PYC- CKoro CKYCCTBa. Penil1H AOCTYlr 6011bworo MaCTepCTBa B )f(BOnYlCiI1. K KOHLJ.Y CTOlleTiI1st OH 3aBOeBaJl wpOKoe 06LlteCTBeHHoe np3HaHL-1e  CTaIl npo<l>eccopoM B AKa- AeM )t(iI1BOnLt1C. r_ S--4 .... l'I g Questions and answers: 1) What do you know about Repin's childhood? 2) Why did I. Repin join the "Pered- vizhniki SocietyU? 3) What paintings of Repin do you re- member? 4) What is your favourite portait by Repin? 5) Why do people admire Repin's pic- tures? WORDLIST achieve [d'tfi:v] - AOCTraTb admire [dd'maid] - Bocx11111aTb(cSI) barge-hauler eba:ct)h:]d] - 6YPllaK be exhausted [ig'Z:stid] -6b1Tb 3MOTaHHblM canvas ekrenvs] - n0J10THO, KapTVlHa common ekmdn] - npocTo£1 create [kri:'eit] - C03A(lBaTb development [di'veldpmdnt] - pa3B11Te devote [di'vdUt] - nOCBSllllaTb event [i'vent] -Co6bITe exhibit [ig'zibit] -BbICTaBJ1S1Tb (B ranepee) expose [iks'pdUZ] -06J111yaTb, pa306J1ayaTb force [f:s] - C11J1a gain [gein] -aaBoeBaTb genius rcBi:njds] - reHL4i1 genre [130: nr] - MaHepa. >KaHp Repin began painting in his early childhood. Because he was a realistic paint- er. I remember "Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16, 1581 U , "Princess Sophia at Novodevichy Monastery" and liThe Zaporozhian Cos- sacks Write a Letter to the Turkish Sultan". It is the portrait of Tolstoy. People admire them because he shows the beauty, spirit and power of Russian people. get acquainted [d'kweintid] - n03HaKOMTbC graduate ('grredjueit] -3aKaHYBaTb Bblcwee Y"Ie6Hoe aaBeAeHHe inhuman [in'hju:m:}n] - 6eCyeI10BeYHbli1, >KeCTOKH inspiration [.inspd'reiJ(d)n] - BAOXHOBeHL-1e labour eleibd] - TPYA oppression [d'preJ(d)n] -yrHeTeH11e outstanding = prominent [aut'strendil) 'prmindnt] - BblAalOlltC passion [lpreJ(:})n] - CTpaCTb perspiration Lp:spd'reiJ( d)n] - nOTeHL-1e (TPYA) recognition [.rek:>g'niJ( )n] - npVl3HaHL4e sense [sens] -CMblCll society [sd'saiti] - 061lteCTBO spiritual ['spiriuul] -AYXOBHbI "Unexpected Return" ['Aniks'pektid] -"He >KACiJlVl" Bm Topics 
Genius must be born, and never can be taught. Dryden feHueM Ha,ltO pO,lJ,MTbCfl. Apai:1AeH MIKHAIL LOMONOSOV Mikhail Vasilievich Lomonosov, the greatest Russian scientist and poet, was born in 1711 not far from Kholmogori in the Far North (Archangelskaya region). He began his working life when he was still a boy. The son of a fisherman, Misha often went with his father to the White sea and to the Arctic Ocean. He learned much about nature and about the life of his country. At an early age Lomonosov was eager to learn and read every book he could find. Soon he knew by heart a few books that he had found. At the age of 19 the young man left his home and went on foot to Moscow where he managed to enter the Siavonic-Greek-Latin Academy. His first years of study were difficult, but Mikhail worked hard and made great progress. His teachers saw how clever and industrious he was and five years later he was sent to the Gymnasium of the Academy of Sciences in St. Peters- burg. His unusual ability as a student became evident very soon, and Lomonosov was sent to Germany to study chemistry and metallurgy. In 1745 Lomonosov was elected to the Academy and appointed professor of chemistry. M. Lomonosov founded the first chemical laboratory in 1748. His discover- ies enriched many branches of knowledge. Lomonosov's ideas forestalled the science of that time. Lomonosov was a great physicist, chemist and astrono- mer. He formulated the main principles of one of the basic laws of physics - the law of conservation of matter and motion. Besides this M. Lomonosov wrote poetry (verses) that had a great effect on the development of the Rus- sian literary language. The first Russian grammar was written by him as well. Moscow University was founded on the initiative of Lomonosov in 1755. M. Lomonosov was generally recognized as one of the most outstanding persons in the world in the 18th century. Lomonosov was a great patriot deeply loving his Motherland and had a great desire to make it a prosperous country. MMxaMn nOMOHOCOB Mxa11 Bac11beB4 JlOMOHOCOB. Be114awVI PYCCKVI Y4eHblt1  nOST. pOAllCS1 B 1711 rofJ.Y HeAaJleKO OT X011Morop Ha Kpat1HeM CeBepe (B ApxaH- reJlbCKot1 06JlaCT). OH Ha4a11 TPYAOBYIO )I(3Hb. KorAa 6blJl ee Mal1b4KOM. CblH pbl6aKa. ML1wa aCTO BbIXOfJ.J1 B 6e110e Mope  CeBepHblVl JlefJ.OBl1TbIVl OKeaH co CBO- L1M OTUOM. OH MHoro Y3HaJl 0 nppoAe H >KH3HH cBoero KpaS1. C paHHero B03- paCTa JlOMOHOCOB CTpaCTHO >Ke11aJl Y4TbCS1 H npoHTblBaJl Ka)f(AYtO KHry. KO- TOPYtO Mor HaVlT. BCKope OH 3HM Ha3YCTb HeCKo11bKO KHr. KOTopble OTbl- CKa11. B B03pacTe 19 11eT IOHowa nOKHY11 CBO AOM  nowe11 neWKOM B MocKBY, rfJ.e eMY YAaJlOCb nocTynTb B C11aBS1Ho-rpeKo-11aTHCKYIO aK8AeMIO. nepsble rOAbl ero Y4e6bl 6blll TPYAHbIM. HO MxaHI1 MHoro TPYA11CS1 H AOCTr 60llb- woro ycnexa. Era Y4Tel1S1 BAe11, KaKo OH YMHbl  TPYAollt06Bblt1,  5 lleT cnYCTS1 OH 6bl11 HanpaB11eH B rMHa3HIO npH AK8AeMH HaYK B CaHKT-neTep- 6ypre. Ero He06bl4at1Hble cnoc06HoCTH CTa11H 04eBAHbIMl1 oeHb CKOpO,  nOMoHocoBa nOC11a11 B repMaHtO fr13Y4aTb XHMtO 111 MeTall11yprtO. Topics mJ 
8 1745 rOAY nOMOHOCOB 6bl1l 36paH B AKaAeM1O  Ha3Ha4eH npocpecco- pOM XM. B 1748 rOAY M. nOMOHOCOB OCHOBal1 nepBYIO xM4ecKYIO lla60paTOptO. Ero OTKpbITSI 060raT1l MHore OTpaCll 3HaH. Ae nOMOHocoBa onepeAll HaYKY Toro BpeMeH. nOMOHOCOB 6bl1l BellKM Cp3KOM, XM- KOM  aCTpoHoMOM. OH CCPOPMYllpOBall OCHOBHble npHu.nbl OAHoro 3 CPYHAaMeHTallbHblX 3aKOHOB cp3K - 3aKOHa coxpaHeHSI MaTep  AB)I(e- HS1. KpoMe Toro, M. B. JlOMOHOCOB ncall CTX, KOTopble OKa3all orpOM- Hoe BllS1He Ha pa3BTe PYCCKoro I1TepaTypHOrO Sl3b1Ka. M 6bllla TalOKe HancaHa nepBaSl PYCCKaSl rpaMMaTKa. no HaTBe JlOMoHocOBa B 1755 rOAY 6bl1l OCHOBaH MOCKOBCK YH- BepcTeT. M. B. nOMOHOCOB 6bl1l BceMpHo np3HaH OAHM 3 caMblX BbIAatOw.xcSI lltOAe XVIII CTOlleTSt JlOMOHOCOB 6blll BellKM naTpoToM, rlly60Ko llt06S1W.M CBoe OTe4ecT- BO,  Mell 6011bwoe )f(ellaHe cAellaTb ero npou.BeTatOw.M. Questions 1) Where and when was Lomonosov born? 2) In what century did he live? 3) What was Lomonosov famous for? 4) What did he invent? 5) What Russian scientists do you know? 6) What occupies the minds of modern scientists now? r  ... :!t g WORDLIST ability ['biliti] -cnoc06HoCTb. YMeHe appoint ['p:Jint] - Ha3HaaTb Arctic Ocean ['a:ktik 'UJ(  )n] - CeBepHbl neAoBTbl OKeaH astronomer ['str3nm] - aCTpOHOM be elected [i'lektid] - 6b1Tb 36paHHblM branch [bra: ntJ] - OTpaCJ1b chemist ['kemist] - XMVlK chemistry ['kemistri] - XMVl5t deep [di:p] - rJ1y60KVli1 desire [di'zai] - C1-1JlbHOe >KeJ1aHVle development [di'velpmnt] - pa3BTVle, pOCT eager ['i:g] - C1-1J1bHO >KellalO. cTpeMS1i1C5t (K) enrich [in'ritf] - 060ral$Tb enter ['ent] - nocrynaTb (B) evident ['evidnt] - oeBAHbli1, S1BHbli1 exact [ig'zrekt] -TOHbli1 find [faind] (found, found)- HaXOATb fisherman ['fiJmn] - pbl6aK forestall [f:J:'st3:I] - onepe>KaTb formulate ['f:J:mjuleit] - C<!>OPMYJ1Lt1pOBaTb found ['faund] -OCHOBbIBaTb generally ['cBen(  )rli] - Bo06Ll\e genius ['cBi:njs] - reHi1 Gymnasium of the Academy of Sciences - rMHa35t np1-1 AKaAeMLt1 HaYK Em Topics industrious [in'dAstris] -TPYA0J1106BbI. npJ1e>K- Hbl initiative [i'niJitiv] - HLtaT1-1Ba know by heart ['nu bai ha:t] - 3HaTb Ha1-13YCTb knowledge ['n:JIicB] - 3HaH5t laboratory [l'b:Jrt(  )ri] -lla60paTOp1-151 law [l:] - 3aKOH manage ['mrenict3] - YAaBaTbC5I metallurgy [me'trelct3i] - MeTaIlJ1ypn.151 physicist ['fizisist] - <!>Vl3K physics ['fiziks] - <t>1-131-1Ka principle ['prinspl] - npHLtn prosperous ['pr:Jsprs] - npou.BeTalO1-1 recognize ['rekgnaiz] - np3HaBaTb Siavonic-Greek-Latin Academy [gri:k 'Iretin 'kredami] - CJ1aB5IHO-rpeKo- J1aT1-1HCKa51 aKaAeM5I soon [su:n] - BCKope, CKOpO the law of conservation of matter and motion ['I:J: :JV 'k:Jns:'veiJ()n :JV 'mret rend 'muJ()n] - 3aKOH coxpaHeH5I MaTep1-1  AB>KeH1-151 underline LAnd'lain] - nOAepK1-1BaTb unusual [An 'jU:3U 1] - Heo6b1KHOBeHHbI verse [v:s] -CTX White Sea [wait 'si:] - EeJ10e Mope 
Men learn while they teach. Seneca Yl/a pyr":1x - Yl/UWbCfl CaM. CeHeKa Why learn English? A letter of a young teacher My dear friends! I, Veronika Arsalan, am presenting the fifth generation of language teach- ers in our family. When I was a girl of 10, I already decided to become a teacher of English like my granny Olga Arsalan who has been teaching English for more then 60 years at different levels by now. That is why I finished an English school and gfaduated with honours from the language faculty of the Moscow pedagogical Institute in 1990. Being a student I had a marvellous opportunity to study for some time at the Surrey University in England thanks to a student exchange programme. Later on I had a lucky chance to work as an educator at a joint Soviet-Ameri- can youth camp. Imagine my enjoyment when I held in my hands my teacher's diploma for the first time! Since then I've been teaching English at a gymnasium and a lyceum with great pleasure and devoted many weekends and holidays to extracurricular work: hiking, horseback riding, kayak -paddling, skiing with my pupils or just having wonderful birthday parties at somebody's home. . To tell you the truth I used every possibility to tell my pupils that they should learn English to perfection. I told them how happy I was being able to associ- ate with people in England, Holland, Italy and France, because all of them speak English well and were eager to learn as much as possible about life in Russia, our history and culture. English was (and is) a real treasure of mine because I could read books and periodicals in the original, go on sightseeing tours and understand T.V. and radio programs. As we know, English is becoming a universal language on our planet. One per- son out of six in the world knows English nowadays. It makes the people's life more fruitful, interesting and enjoyable. But its greatest role will be in the nearest future when mankind starts solving the most important problems of war and peace, ecology, demography, social and moral codes and many, many others. It will greatly help LIS to reach mutual understanding which will tremendous- ly improve the people's life on our planet. That is why, dear pupils, go on learning English as hard as possible. And in the nearest future it will help you to become highly-qualified specialists and happy citizens of our Universe. Best wishes, good luck and much success to all of you, my dear friends! Yours, fondly Veronika Arsalan. WORDLIST citizen ['sitizn] - rpa)I(AaHi-1H devote [di'vut] - nOCB5JUJ.aTb extracurricular ['ekstrk'rikjI] - BHeaYALt1TOp- Hbl gymnasium [cBim'neizjm] - rMHa3V15J highly-qualified ['haili kw1i'faid] - BbICOKOKBaJ1V1- <PLt1u.VlpoBaHHbl kayak-paddling ['kairek'predliIJJ - nJ1aBaHVle Ha 6ai1AapKax lyceum [lai'sim] - J1i-1u.ei1 periodical Lpiri'dik(  )1] - nepi-10AVlyeCKOe . Vl3AaHVletypHan tremendously [tri'mtndsli] - 3A. nOTp51calOUJ.e Universe [u:nivs] - BCeJ1eHHa5J Topics om 
VO ABULARY A abbot ('rebt] - a66aT, HaCT05lTellb abbreviate ('bri:vi,Jit] - cOKpaw.aTb ability [J'biliti] - cnoco6HoCTb, YMeHe abroad ['br:d] - 3a rpaH1I1u.e absolute r'rebsdlu:t] - a6COlltOTHblVi abstract ['rebstrrekt] - a6cTpaKTHbl abuse ['bju:z] - oCKop611eH1I1e accept [dk'sept] - np1l1H1I1MaTb accident I'reksidnt] - aBap5I, HecacTHblVl CJ1YLfa, cllY"'IaC1 accidentally [,reksi'dentJli] - cllYLfaVlHo accompany [J'kAmpJni] -- cOnpOBO)f(.D.aTb accomplish rd'kmpliJ] - ocyw.ecTB1l5lTb, Bbl- nOllHflTb accurately ['rekjufJtli] - TO"'lHO ache [eik] - 6011eTb, HblTb achieve [d'tfi:V] - AOCT1I1raTb acknowledgement [dk'n:>li<tmdnt] - np1l13HaH1I1e acquire [J'kwaid] - np1l106peTaTb act ('rekt J - AellO, nocTynoK activity [rek'tiviti] - AeflTenbHOCTb, 3aH5ITLt1e, ynpa)f(HeHllle add [red] - Ao6aBllflTb address [J'dres] - aApec admire [dd'maid] - BOCXII1w.aTb(cfI) admit [;)d'mit] - AonycKaTb adopt ('dpt] - np1l1HMaTb adult ['redAlt] - 83pOCJ1bIVl, cOBepWeHHOJ1eTH1I1V1 advertising ['redv,taizil)] - peKnaMa advice ld'vaisJ - COBeT affection ['fekf( d )n] - llf06oBb, np1l18f13aHHOCTb afford [d'fJ:d] - n03BOllflTb ce6e afterwards ['a:ftdwddz] - BnOClleACT8111111, no- TOM, n03>Ke again [;)'gen] - On5lTb, CHOBa against [d'genstJ - npOTLt18 agree [J'gri:] - COrllaWaTbCS1 agricultural Lregri'kAIUdrdI] - CellbCKOX03S1V1CT- BeHHbl1i1 ahead [d'hcd] - BnepeALt1 air [Cd] - B03AYX, aTMoccpepa airy ['cri] - B03AYWHblVl alarm-clock [J'la:mklk] - 6YAII1J1bHIIIK alert ['ld:t] - nOAHflTb TpeBory alien ['cilj;Jn] - '-fY>KO allergy ['rel;Jctil - alllleprlt1f1 alley ['reHl - aJlJle51 allow ['lau] - n03BOJlS1Tb, pa3pewaTb almost [1:lmdust] - nO'-fT1I1 along [J'}:>IJJ - BAOllb also [':lsdu] - TalOKe although [:l'OdU] - XOTfi &II Vocabulary always [':>:lwdz] - BcerAa amaze ['meiz] - 1113YMIlflTb, nopa)t(aTb, YA1I1B- J1S1Tb amber ['rembd] - S1HTapb ambitious [rem'bifJs] - LfecTOllt06111BblVl arnount (J1maunt) - KOlllIILfeCTBO amphorae ['remfri:] - aMQ>opbl amusing [J'mju:zil)] - 3a6aBHbl£1 ancestor ['rensistd] - npeAoK ancient ['einfJnt] - ApeBH, cTaplllHHblVl anger ['refJgd] - rHeB angler ['ccfJgld] - PbI60110B-YAl1bW.K angry ['relJgri] - CepALt1Tblal1 animal ['renimdl] - )t(1I1BOTHoe annex ['reneks] - AOnOJlHeHllle anniversary Lreni'v:sJri] - rOAoBu.J.IIIHa announce [J'nauns] - coo6w.aTb annoy [;}'nJi] - pa3Apa)l(aTb annoyance ['n:>ins] - pa3APIDKeHllle annual ['renjuJl] - e>KerOAHblal1 ant (rent] - MypaBe ant-hill ['renthil] - MypaBeHL-1K anticipat [ren'tisipcit] - O>K1I1AaTb, npeAB1I1AeTb antiquity [ren'tikwiti) - ApeBHOCTb aHTIIIHOCTb antler ('rentJd] - OlleHlllaI1 por ' anxious ['rel)kfdSJ - o3a604eHHbl anywhere l'eniwEJ] - Be3Ae apartment [J'pQ:tmnt] - KBapTlllpa apology [d'pJldctil - 1113BHeHllle apparently (lprerJnt1i] - nO-BIIIAMOMY appeal to smb [d'pi:l] - HpaBTbc KOMY-TO appear rd'pid) - B03H1-1KaTb, nOBJ1f1TbCS1, Ka- 3aTbCS1 appearance [d'pidr(d)ns] - BHeWHlI1a11 B1I1A, BHeWHOCTb . appliance [d'plaidns] - annapaTypa appoint [d'pint] - Ha3HaLfaTb appreciate [d'pri:Ji,eit) - BblCOKO u.eHII1Tb, 6na- rOAapL-1Tb approach [J'prdutf] - nOAXoAIIITb, np1l16J1I11>KaTb- CS1 approval (d'pru:vl] - oAo6peHII1e arch [a:UJ - 3rIl16aTb(cS1) AyroVl archaeologist [,Q:ki'ldctist] - apxeollor archery ('a:gdri] - CTpellb6a 1113 llYKa architect ['a:kitekt] - apxlIITeKTOp area ['£?riJ] - 0611aCTb, ccpepa, paCCTOflHlI1e argue [a:gju:] - CnOpll1Tb argument [1a:gjumdntJ -AOBOA, apryMeHT arouse ['rauz J - Bbl3blBaTb, npo6Y>KAaTb arrange [d'reinct5] - AorOBapIllBaTbC, Yl1ClAII1Tb. YCTpaBaTb, OpraHII130BbiSaTb arrive [d'raiv] - nplt16blBaTb, npllle3>KaTb arrow ['rerdu] - cTpel1a art [o:t] - It1CKYCCTBO I, t 
artist ['o:tist] - XYAO)f(HLt1K ass [res] - ocell assignment ['sainmnt] - 3(lAaHLt1e assist ['sistJ - nOMoraTb. cOAeVtCTBoBaTb assure [JU;)] - YBepTb astronaut ['restrn:t] - aCTpoHaBT, KOCMOHaBT astronomer [J'strnm] - aCTpOHOM athletic [re8'letik] - cnopTBHblVt atmosphere ['retnl,sfi J - aTMoccpepa, B03AYX attach ['tretf] - npKpenllTb attack ['trek] - aTaKOBaTb, HanaAaTb attend ['tend] - nocew.aTb attention ('tenf()n] - BHLt1MaHLt1e attentive ['tentiv] - BHLt1MaTellbHbIVi attitude ('retitju:d] - OTHoweHe, T04Ka 3peH1I15J attract ['trrekt] - npLt1BlleKaTb attractive [J'trrektiv] - np1l1BlleKaTellbHblll1 audience f:djns] - aYATOp1l15J, ny6llKa, 3p1l1Tell author [':8] - aBTOp average ['revrict] - cpeAH1I1 avoid [d'vJid] - L-136eraTb await ['weit] - )f(AaTb, O)f(Lt1AaTb awful ['3:ful] - }l)KaCHb11l1 B baby ['beibi] - pe6eHoK back [brek] - Cnt.1Ha background ['brekgraund] - 38AH1I1111 nnaH. cpOH bacon ['bci k(  ) n] - 6eKoH bake (beik] - neYb, BblneKaTb balance ['brelns] - paBHOBeC1l1e ball [bJ:l J - 6all ban [bren] - 3anpew.aTb bank (breIJk] - 6eper peK1I1 barefoot ['begfut] - 6ocoVt barely ['bcli] - eABa. TonbKO bark [bo: k] - J1aTb basin r'beisn] - BOAoeM basis ['beisis] - OCHOBa basketball ['bo:skitbJ:l] - 6acKeT6on bathe [beio] - KynaTbc bathroom ['ba:8rum] - BaHHa51 battery ['bretri] - 6aTapell1Ka battle [bretl] - 6L-1TBa bay [bei] - 3a1l1l1B, 6yxTa beach [bi:tf] - MOPCKO 6eper beak [bi: k] - KllfOB bear [bE] - BblHOC1I1Tb bear [be] - MeABeAb beat [bi:t] (beat, beaten) - YAap5JTb beautiful ('bju:tful] - KpaCL-1BaSl ()f(eHLLW1Ha) beauty ['bju:ti] - KpacoTa beaver ['bi:vJ] - 606p become [bi'kAnl] (became, become) - CTaTb bedclothes ['bedkIJuoz] - nOCTenbHoe 6ellbe bedside ['bedsaid] - nOCTenb bee [hi:] - nyena beehive ['bi:,haiv] - YJleii1 beetle [bi:tJ] - )KYK beg [beg] - npOC1I1Tb, YMOllSlTb beginning [bi'ginilJ] - HayallO behave rbi'heiv] - BeCTL-1 ce651 behaviour [bi'heivi] - nOBeAeHlt1e belfry ['belfri] - KOllOKOllbHst belief [bi'li:f) - Bepa, BepOSaHL-1e believe [bi'li:v] - nOllaraTb, AYMaTb, Seplt1Tb, AOBepstTb belong lbi'IH)J - nplt1HaAlle)t(al b below l bi'l;)u] - BHLt13Y beneath [bi'ni:8] - nOA, BHlI13Y benefit ['benifit] - npt.1HOCiI1Tb nOJlb3Y beside [bi'said] - pstAOM besides [bi'saidz] - KpOMe bet [bet] - Aep>KaTb napLt1 beverage ['bevricBJ - Hant.1TOK beyond [bi1Jnd] - 3a, no TY CTOPOHY, CBepx, CBblwe billion ['biljJo] - Mt.1llnlt1apA bind [baind] (bound, bound) - 06beA1I1HTbCst biosphere ['bai;)sfi J - 6lt1oc<t.>epa birch [bJ:tfj - 6epeaa bird [bJ:d] - nTIt1u.a birth [bJ:8] - p0)f(AeHVle bit [bit] - KYcOyeK, KllOYOK bite [bait] (bit, bitten) - KycaTb bitter ['bit] - rOpbKlt1l11, >KeCTOKiI1l11 blanket [1Jlrel)kit] - OAeSlllO bless ['bles] - 6naroCllOBllstTb blind [blaind] - cnenoC1 block [bl3kJ - Ky61t1K bloom [blu:m] - u.seCT1I1 blossom ['b]3sm) - LJ.aeCTt.1 blow [blJu] - 1. YAap; 2. AYTb (blew, blown) bluebell ['blu:bel] - KOnOKOl1bY1I1K blush [blAn - KpaCHeTb board [b:>:d] - 60PT cYAHa body ['b3di] - TellO bog [bg] - 60J10TO boil [b3i1] - Sapt.1Tb boldness ['bJuJdnJs] - xpa6pocTb, CMellOCTb bone [bun] - KOCTb, KOCTOYKa border ['b3:d] - 1. rpaHu.a, Py6e)K; 2. rpaHIt1- Y 1I1Tb borrow ['brJu] - 3aHiI1MaTb, 6paTb B3aVtMbi botanist ['bJtnist] - 60TaH1I1K both [bJu8] - o6a, 06e bottom ('bJtm] - AHO bouquet [1>ukel] - 6YKeT bow [bJu] - JlYK, CMblYOK bowl [bul] - yawa, MIt1CKa brain [brein] - Moar branch [bro:nijJ - seTBb, BeTKa, OTpaCllb brave [breiv] - xpa6pblVl, CMel1blii1 break [breikJ - nepeMeHa, nepepblB breath [breS] - AbIXaH1I1e. AYHoBeH1I1e breathe [bri:o 1 - BAoXHyrb brew [bru:] - 3aSap1l1Tb brief lbri:f] - KOpOTKiI1, MiI1MOfleTHbl1l1 bright [brait] - PKVli1 brightness ['braitnis] - stpKOCTb Vocabulary Elm 
brilliant ['briljdnt] - 6IlecTflw.Lt1C1 bring [brilJ] (brought, brought) - npLt1HOCLt1Tb broad [br:d] - WLt1poKLt1C1 bronze [brJnz] - 6poH3a broth [brJe] - 6YIlbOH bubble [bAbl] - KLt1neTb, nY3blpLt1TbCfl buckle [bAkl] - npfl)f(Ka bud [bAd] - nOYKa buffet ['bufei] - 6ycpeT build [bild] (built, built) - CTpOLt1Tb building ['bildilJ] - 3AaHLt1e, CTpOeHLt1e bumble-bee ['bAmblbi:] - WMeIlb burn [bd:n] - )f(eYb, 06)f(VlraTb burning ['bd:nilJ] - ropflw.Lt1C1, nbIIlatOw.VI bury ['beri] - XOPOHVlTb, 3aKanbiBaTb bush [bun - KYCT " KycTapHLt1K bust [bAst] - 6tOCT buttercup ['bAtdkAp] - IltOTLt1K butterfly ['bAtdflai] - 6a6oYKa button [bAtn] - 3aCTerLt1BaTb nyrOBLt1LJ.bl buzz [bAZ] - )f(y)f()l(aHLt1e [ cabbage ['krebi<t] - KanYCTa cabin ['krebin] - Ka6Lt1Ha cafeteria Lkrefi'tidrid] - KacpeTepLt1C1 cage [keict3] - KIleTKa calcium ['krelsidm] - KaJ1bLJ.Lt1C1 calf [ka:f] - TeIleHOK call [k:]] - Ha3blBaTb, OKIlLt1KaTb camp [kremp] - Ilarepb camping ['krempilJ] - Lt1ATLt1 B nOXOA C HOyeBKOC1 can [kren] - )f(eCTflHa 6aHKa cannon ['krendn] - nYWKa, 0PYALt1e canvas ['krenvds] - nOIlOTHO, XOIlCT, KapTLt1Ha capital ['krepitl] - KanVlTaIl, CTOIlLt1LJ.a captain ['kreptin] - KanVlTaH captivity [krep'tiviti] - nIleH capture ['krepij] - 3axBaTVlTb, B3f1Tb B nIleH care (about) [k£] - 1. OCTOpO)f(HOCTb, 3a6oTa; 2. 3a6oTLt1TbCfI (0) career [kd'rid] - Kapbepa careful ['k£fu]] - BHLt1MaTeIlbHblC1, 3a6oTIlLt1BblC1 caretaker ['k£d,tikd] - 6blTb OTBeTCTBeHHblM carnation [ka:'neif( d )n] - rB03ALt1Ka carpet ['ka:pit] - KOBep carrot ['krert] - MOpKOBb carry ['kreri] - HeCTLt1, npVlHOCLt1Tb, npOHeCTLt1 (0 YYBcTBax) cartoon [ka:'tu:n] - KapLt1KaTypa carve [ka:v] - Bblpe3aTb, BblceKaTb case [keis] - cIlyyaC1 castle [ka:sl] - 3aMOK, KpenocTb cat [kret] - KOWKa catch ['kreU] (caught, caught) - IlOBVlTb catch up [kretfJ (caught, caught) - AorOHTb catholic ('kreedlik] - KaTOIlLt1K cattle [kretl] - KpynHbl£1 poraTblC1 CKOT cause [k:z] - 1. npVlYi1Ha; 2. npVlYVlHTb, 6blTb am Vocabulary npLt1YLt1HoC1 cavalry ['krevlri] - KaBaIlepLt1f1 cave [keiv] - 6epIlora, HopKa cavern ['krevdn] - new.epa caviare ['krevia:] - VlKpa cedar ['si:d] - KeAPoBbl1ll celebrate ['selibreit] - npa3AHoBaTb celebration Lselibreif()n] - npa3AHOBaHLt1e cell [sell - KIleTKa century ['senijuri] - aeK, CTOIleTLt1e ceremony ['serimni] - LJ.epeMOHLt1f1, o6pflA certain [Sd1n] - onpeAeIleHHblC1 certainly ['s:tnli] - KOHeYHO chain [ijein] - u.enb chamber ['ijeimb] - naJ1aTa chance [ija:ns] - cJ1Y'-faC1, waHC change ['ijein<t] - CAaya, Lt13MeHeHLt1e, nepe- MeHa, CMeHa changeable ['ijein<tbl] - Lt13MeHYVlBbl£1, 6bICT- pOMeHfltOw.Lt1C1cfl channel ['ijrenI] - KaHaJ1 character ['kreriktd] - repoC1, AeC1cTBYIOw.ee llVlU,O characteristic (.kreriktd'ristik] - oco6eHHocTb charm [ija:m] - OyapOBaHlI1e charming ['ija:mil)] - OyapOBaTellbHblC1, npe- KpacHblC1 chart [ija:t] - 1. Ta61lLt1u,a; 2. HaHOCLt1Tb Ha KapTY chat [ijret] - 1. 601lTOBHfI, 6eceAa; 2. 60IlTaTb chauffeur [Jdufd] - wocpep check [ijek] - npoBepflTb cheer ['tJid] - nOA6aAPVlBaTb chemical ['kemik( d) 1] - XLt1M lI1yecKLt1£1 chemist ['kemist] - XLt1MLt1K chemistry ['kemistri] - XII1MLt1f1 chessboard [1fesb:d] - waxMaTHast AOCKa chessmen ('ijesmen] - waXMaTHble Q>Lt1rYPbl chew [iju:] - )f(eBaTb chief [tfi:fj - rIlaBHblC1 child [tfaild] - pe6eHoK chill [tfiI] - OXlla)f(AaTb, CTYALt1Tb chimney ['tJimni] - AblMOXOA choir ['kwaid] - Xop choke [ijduk] - 3C1AblxaTbCfI choose [tfu:z] (chose, chosen) - BbI6V1paTb, npeAnOYLt1TaTb chop [ijJp] - Hape3aTb church [ijd:ifJ - u,epKOBb, co6op cigar [si'ga:] - CLt1rapa cinders ['sinddz] - 30Ila circle ['sd:kl] - 06BOALt1Tb circumference [sd'kAmf(d)rdns] - OKPY)f(HOCTb citadel ['sitdl] - KpenocTb citizen ['sitizn] - >KLt1TeIlb, rpa)f(tJ.aHLt1H city ('siti] - ropoA civi I ization [.sivilai'zeif( d) n] - u,Lt1 BLt1IlVl3au,VlfI claim [kleim] - 3A. 3astBIlflTb clarity ('klreriti] - flCHOCTb clasp [kla:sp] - C)f(VlMaTb class [kla:s] - KJ1aCC (06w.ecTBeHHbllll) claw [kl:>:] - KorOTb 
j clean [kli:n] - 1. np6paTb, y6it1paTb, Yit1C- Tit1Tb; 2. Yit1CTbl clearing [kliri1)] - npocBeT clearly ['klili] - 5ICHO climb [klaim] - nOAHit1MaTbC5I, n01l3Tit1 close [klus] - 61lit13KO, 61lit13Kit1, PflAOM clothing ['kluoiJ)] - OAe)f(Aa clue [kIu:] - KlltOY coach [kuU1 - KapeTa, 3Kit1na)f( coachman ['kutfmn] - Kyyep coal [kul] - yrOllb (KaMeHHbl) coast [kust] - MOpCKOVt 6eper, n06epe)f(be cockroach ['kkruU1 - TapaKaH coin [kin] - MOHeTa cola ['kuI] - KOKa-KOlla cold [kould] - X01l0AHbl colleague ['kli:g] - KOllllera collect [k'lekt] - C06it1paTb collection [k'lekfn] - KOlllleKLJ.it1f1 column ['klm] - K01l0HHa combine [km'bain] - CMeWit1BaTb come [kAm] (came, come) - npit1XOAit1Tb, npit1- e3)f(aTb comedy ['kmdi]- KOMeAit1f1 comfort ['kAmft] - 1. YAo6cTBO, nOKo; 2. yc- nOKait1BaTb comfortable ['kAmftbl] - ytOTHbl, YAo6Hbl comics ['kmiks] - KOMit1KCbl comma ['km] - 3an5lTa51 command [k'ma:nd] - KOMaHAOBaTb, npit1Ka- 3blBaTb commemorate [k'memreit] - 6blTb nOCBS1- w.eHHbIM yeMY- TO, B 03HaMeHOBaHit1e comment ['kment] - 3aMeyaHit1e commerce ['km:s] - TOprOBllfl common ['kmn] - o6w.it1Vt, npoCTOVt, 06bIKHO- BeHH, pacnpocTpaHeHHVt community [k'mju:niti] - o6w.ecTBo comparison [km'prerisn] - cpaBHeHiI1e . compatriot [km'pretrit] - COOTeyeCTBeHHit1K competition Lkmpi'tif()n] - copeBHOBaHit1e, KOHKYPC complain [km'plein] - )f(aI10BaTbCS1 complete [km'pli:t] - 1. 3aKaHYit1BaTb, 3aBep- waTb; 2. nOllHblVi complex ['kmpleks] - C1l0)f(HbIVt compose [km'puz] - COCTaBllflTb, COYiI1HflTb composition Lkmp'zifn] - COYiI1HeHit1e compulsory [km'pAls(  )ri] - 06f13aTellbHblVt concentrate ['knsentreit] - cocpeAOTOYit1BaTb concept ['knsept] - nOHit1MaHit1e concern [kn's:n] - 3a6oTa concert ['knst] - KOHLJ.epT conclusion [kn'klu:3( J )n] - 3aKJItOyeHit1e condemn [kn'dem] - oCY)f(AaTb condemnation Lkndem'nei.K)n] - npit1rOBOp condition [kn'di.R  )n] - YC1l0Bit1e conduct [kn'dAkt] - AiI1pit1)f(it1pOBaTb, PYKOBOAiI1Tb confidence ['knfid()ns] - AOBepil1e congratulate [kn'grretju.leit] - n03ApaBllflTb connect [k'nekt] - CBfl3b1BaTb, COeAit1HflTb conquer ['kI)k] - 3aBoeBbiBaTb conquest[1l)kwe]-3aBOeBaHit1e,nOKOpeHit1e conservatoire [kn's:vtwa:] - KOHcepBaTOpit1f1 consider [kJn'sidJJ - paCCMaTpit1BaTb, peWil1Tb, CYit1TaTb, nOllaraTb, AYMaTb considerate [kn'sid(J)ritJ - BHit1MaTellbHbIVi consideration [kJn.sidJ'rejf( d) n] - BHit1MaHit1e consist of [kJn'sist] - COCTOflTb it13 console [kJn'sul] - YTewaTb constantly ['knstJntlil - nOCTOflHHO constitute ['knstitju:t] - COCTaBllflTb construction [kdn'strAkf(J)n] - 3acTpoVlKa, KOH- CTPYKLJ.it1f1 contain [kJn'tein 1 - COAep)f(aTb, BMew.aTb container [kn'tein] - KOHTeVlHep contemporary [kn'temp(J)rJri] - cOBpeMeHHit1K contented [kdn'tentid] - AOBOllbHblVi contest ['kntest] - KOHKYPC contestant [kn'testnt 1 - KOHKypcaHT contract [knt'rrekt] - C)f(VlMaTb contribute [kn'tribju:t] - BHOCit1Tb BKllaA convenience [kn'vi:njnsJ - YAo6cTBO convenient [kJn'vi:njJntJ - YAo6HblVi conversation LknvJ'seifJn] - pa3roBop, 6e- ceAa convey [kn'vei] - Bblpa)f(aTb convince [kn'vins] - y6e)f(AaTb cook [kuk] - 1. nOBap, KyxapKa; 2. rOTOBit1Tb cooker ('kukJ] - nllV1Ta, neYb cool [ku:l] - 1. OXlla>KAaTb; 2. npOxl18,AHblVi cope [kJup] - CnpaBllflTbCfI copper ['kpJ] - MeAb copy ['kpi] - nepenVlCblsaTb, Cnit1CblBaTb corn [k:n] - 3epHO, KYKYPY3a, nWeHit1u.a corrosion [kJ'rJU3(J)n] - KOpp03V1f1 cost [kst] - 1. CTOVIMOCTb; 2. CTOil1Tb, o6xo- AVlTbCfI (cost, cost) cosy ['kJuzi] - YtOTHblVi cottage ['kJticB] - KOTTerot< cough [kf1 - KaWl151Tb council ['kaunsl] - coseT count [kaunt] - CYVlTaTb countryside ['kAntrisaid] - cellbCKafi MeCTHOCTb couple [kApl] - napa courage ['kAricBJ - My)f(ecTBo, OTBara courageous [kJ'reicBs] - CMellblVt cou rse [k:s] - KYPC court [k:tl - KOpT, CYA courteous ['k:tjs] - Be)f(l1it1BbIVt cousin [kAzn] - ABOtOPOAHblVt 6paT cove [kuv] - 6YXTa cover ['kAv] - 1. nOKpbIBaJ10; 2. HaKpblBaTb, OXBaTbIBaTb, nOKpblBaTb cow [kau] - KopOBa coward ['kaud] - TPYC crack [krrek] - TpeCKaTbCfI, paCKaIlblBaTb( CfI) craftsman ['kra:ftsmJn] - peMeCJ1eHHVlK, MaCTep crawl [kr:l] - n0113TVI crazy ['kreizi] - 6e3YMHblVt create [kri:'eitJ - C03AaTb, C03AaBaTb, TBOpit1Tb creature ['kri:tf] - cyw.ecTBo, C03AaHit1e Vocabulary mD 
creep (kri:p] (crept, crept) - n0113aTb, nOAKpa- AblBaTbcS1 creepy ['kri:pi] - npOTLt1BHbllil crew [kru:] - 3KLt1nIDK Kopa611S1 cricket ['krikit] - KpLt1KeT critical ['kritikl] - KpLt1TLt1eCKLt1 criticism ['kritisizm] - KpLt1TLt1Ka criticize ['kritisaiz] - KpLt1TLt1KOBaTb crop [kr:>p] - YPo)t(a cross [kr::>s] - KpeCT crowd [kraud] - 1. TOl1na; 2. TOl1nLt1TbCSl crude (kru:d] - rpy6bl cruel ['krul] - >KeCTOKLt1V1 cry [krai] -- KpLt1aTb crystal ['kristl] - npo3paHbllil culture ['kAlif] - KYl1bTypa curiosity (.kjuJri'::>siti] - 11106onb1TcTBO, 111060- 3HaTe11bHOCTb curious ['kjuris] - 111060nbITHbIVl, 3aHLt1Ma- TeJ1bHblC1 curl [k:l] - 3aBLt1TOK currently ['kAldntli] - B Tel<YL1U'1 MOMeHT curriculum [kd'rikjuIm] - nporpaMMa custom ['kAstm] - o6blalil customary ['kAstJmri] - 06blHbIVl, npLt1BblHbllil cutler ['kAtIJ] - TOprOBeLJ. HO)t(aMLt1 cutlery ['kAtlJri] - HO)f(eBble Lt13AellLt1S1, npLt160pbl cycle [saikI] - 1. LJ.Lt1K11; 2. e3ALt1Tb Ha Bell0CLt1neAe D daffodil ['drefdil] - HapLJ.Lt1CC dairy ['d£ri] - MOllOHble npoAYKTbl, MOllOHblC1 daisy ['deizi] - MaprapLt1TKa damage ['dremic3] - 1. nOBpe)t(AeHLt1e; 2. HaHO- CLt1Tb BpeA damn [drem] - 3ary6Lt1Tb dandelion ['drendilain] - 0AYBaHYLt1K danger ['deinc3] - onaCHOCTb dangerous ['deinc3rs] - onacHbl dare ['d£J] - OTBa>KLt1TbCS1 daring ['d£riJ)] - cMe11blVl dark [da:k] - TeMHbl date [deit] - BCTpea, CBLt1AaHLt1e; TOT, KOMY Ha- 3HayalOT CBLt1AaHLt1e, AaTa; 2. Ha3HaaTb CBAaHLt1e, XOALt1Tb Ha CBLt1AaHLt1S1 dawn [d::>:n] - paccaeT deaf [defl - rllYxo deafness ['defnis] - r l1yxoTa deal [di:1l (with) (dealt. dealt) - CnpaBLt1TbCS1 C yeM-TO death [deS] - cMepTb decision [di'si3<)n] - peWeHLt1e declaration Ldekl'reiJ()n] - AeKJ1apaLJ.Lt1S1 declare [di'kl£] - 3aS1BI1S1Tb decompose (.di:km'puz] - pa311araTbcS1 decorate ['dekreit] - YKpawaTb dedicate ['dedikeit] - nocBS1w.aTb deed [di:d] - nocTynoK, AeVlCTBLt1e deep ['di:p] - 1. rJly6l11Ha; 2. rycTo, rJ1y60KLt1 mJ Vocabulary deer [dil - OJ1eHb defeat [di'fi:t 1 - HaHOCLt1Tb nOpa)f(eHlt1e defend [di'fend] - 3aw.Lt1w.aTb degrade [di'greid] - pa3pYWlt1Tb delicate ['delikit] - 3A. TOHKlt1 delicious [di'liJs] - BKYCHbl delight [di'lait] - BocTopr deliver [di'1iv] - AOCTaBJls:lTb demand [di'ma:nd] - 1. Tpe6oBaHlt1e, cnpoc, 3anpoc; 2. Tpe60BaTb dentist ['dentist 1 - 3y6HO Bpa deny [di'nai] - OTpll1u.aTb, He COrJ1aWaTbCS1 depart [di'pa:t] - YXOALt1Tb depend [di'pend] - 3aBlt1CeTb dependable [di'pendJbl] - HaAe)f(HblVl depth [depS] - rJ1y6Lt1Ha descendant [di'sendntJ - nOTOMOK describe [dis'kraib] - xapaKTepLt130BaTb, onLt1- CblBaTb description [di'skripJn] - OnLt1CaHLt1e, Lt1306pa)f(e- HLt1e desert ['dezt] - nycTblHS1 deserve [di'zd:V] - 3aCJ1Y>KLt1BaTb design [di'zain] - 1. 3aMblcell, pLt1CYHOK; 2. npOeKTLt1pOBaTb desire [di'zai] - 1. CL.1J1bHOe )f(eJ1aHLt1e; 2. >Ke- J1aTb desk [desk] - nLt1CbMeHHbIVl CTOJ1 despite [dis'pait] - HeCMOTp Ha destination Ldesti'neif()n] - u.e/1b, MeCTO Ha- 3HaYeHLt1 destroy [dis'tri] - pa3pywaTb, YHLt14TO>KaTb destruction [dis'trAkJ(:)n] - pa3pyweHLt1e, YHL.1YTO)f(eHVie determine [di't:):min] - onpeAeI1Tb develop [di've]:)pJ - pa3BLt1BaTb, cOBepweHcT- BOBaTb, C03AaTb devising [di'vaiziIJ] - BbIAYMaHHbl devote [di'vJut] - nocBS1w.aTb dew [dju:] - poca deck [dek] - na11y6a diameter [dai'remitd] - AL.1aMeTp die [dai] - YML.1paTb diet [dai:)t] - nLt1w.a, AL.1eTa different ['difrnt] - pa3JlLt1Hbl, pa3Hbl dig (dug, dug) - KonaTb, pblTb dimension [di'menJ{)n] - pa3Mepbl, BeJ1V1Lt1Ha diploma [di'plumJ] - ALt1nJ10M disability (.dis:}'biliti] - V1HBallLt1AHOCTb disagree Ldis'gri:] - He COrJ1aWaTbCS1 disappear [.disJ'piJ) - Lt1Ce3aTb disappoint r.dis:}'pint] - pa30yapOBbiBaTb disaster [di'za:st] - 6eACTBLt1e discover (dis'kAv:}] - o6HapY>KVlBaTb, OTKpbl- BaTb, Y3HaBaTb discovery [dis'kAv()ri] - OTKpbITV1e discuss [dis'kAs] - 06C}')KAaTb discussion [dis'kAJ:}n] - o6cy)t(.QeHLt1e disease [di'zi:z] - 60J1e3Hb display rdi'splei] - 1. BblcTaBKa, nOKa3, AVlC- n/1e, MOHVlTOp; 2. BCTaBI1S1Tb 
distance ['distJns] - paCCTOflHlI1e distinctly [dis'til)ktli] - OTyeTllll1BO distract [dis'trrekt) - OTBlleKaTb; c6111BaTb C TOllKY disturb [dis't:b] - MewaTb dive (daiv] - HblpflTb diversity [dai'v:siti] - pa3HOo6pa3Li1e dock [dJk] - AOK dome [dum) - Kynon, CBOA dominance ['d:)minJns] - rocnOACTBO double [dAblJ - ABOt1HL-1K doubt [daut] - COMHeBaTbCfI dove [dAv]-rony6b draft [dra:ftJ - Tflra B03Ayxa dragonfly ['drregnflai] - CTpeK03a draughts [dra:fts] - WaWKL-1 draw [dr:] - pL-1COBaTb KapaHAaWOM drawer [drJ:] - BbIABLi1>KHOi71 fllU,L-1K drawing ['drJ:il)] - pLi1CYHOK dream [dri:m] - 1. COH; 2. MeLfTaTb, BL-1AeTb CHbl dress [dres] - OAeBaTbC drill [drill - CTpoeBafl nOArOTOBKa drink [dril)k] (drank, drunk) - nL-1Tb drip [drip] - KanaHbe drive [draiv] (drove, driven) - e3.D,Li1Tb B MaWLi1- He, npL-1BOALi1Tb drop [drp] - YPOHLi1Tb drug [drAg] - fleKapCTBO during ['djuril)] - BO BpeMfi dying [daiil)] - BbIMLi1patOUJ.Li1i71, YMlI1patOUJ.lI1t1 E each [i:tf] - KIDKAbl£;1, BCflKL-1L11 eagle [i:gl] - open early [':li] - paHbwe, BHayafle earn (:n] - 3apa6aTblBaTb, 3acfI}')KL-1BaTb earth [:e] - 3eMIlS1 easy ['i:zi] - J1erKO ecology [i:lk:)lcti] - 3K01l0rL-1f1 economical Li:k'nmikl] - 3KOHOMHbl ecstasy ['ekstsi] - 3KCTa3, BOCTopr edge ['ect5] - Kpat1, KpOMKa, OKpall1Ha educate ['edju:keit] - AaBaTb o6pa30BaHlI1e, BocnVlTblBaTb education Ledju:'keif()n] - BOCnIl1TaHLi1e, o6pa- 30BaHII1e effect [i'fekt) - Bllll1S1HLi1e, ClleACTBLi1e effort ['eft] - YCLi1f1Li1e elect [i'lekt] - Bbl6Li1paTb electronics [ilek'trniks] - 3JleKTpOHII1Ka element ['elimnt] - SlleMeHT elephant ['elifnt] - C1l0H elevator [.eli'veit] - JlIl1<pT embankment [im'brelJkmnt] - Ha6epe)f(Hafi emblem ['emblm] - 3M6JleMa emergency [i'm:ctnsi] - sKcTpeHHblt1 cnY'-'ai71 emotional [i'mufnl] - SMOLJ.L-10HaJlbHblt1 empty ('cmpti1 - 1. nycToi71; 2. BbI1l0)f(Li1Tb enchant (in'tfa:nt] - OyapOBblBaTb encounter (in'kaunt] - BCTpeTLi1Tb (HeO>KL-1AaH- HO) encourage [in'kArictJ - noow,pflTb endangered [in'deinctJd] - nOABep>KeHHble onaCHOCTLi1 ending ('endil)] - OKOHyaHLi1e, KOHeu, enemy ['enimi] - Bpar energy ['enct5i] - SHeprLi1f1, CLi1na engage [in'gcictJ - npLi1BJleKaTb enjoy [in'ct5i] - HaCna)f(.AaTbC, nOllyaTb YAO- BOllbCTBe enrich [in'riU] - o6oraw.aTb ensemble [a:n'sa:mbl] - aHcaM6nb enter ['entl - BXOAII1Tb, nocTynaTb (B) entertaining (.ent;)'teinio] - 3aHVlMaTellbHblV1 entertainment [.ent'teinmnt] - pa3BJleeHe entire [in'tai] - LJ.ellblC1 envelop [in'velp] - oKpY>KaTb envelope ['envlupJ - KOHBepT environment [in'vairJnmnt] - oKpY>KeHLi1e, OK- PY'KatOw,afl cpeAa equal ['i:kwal] - pasHblt1, paBHTbcfl equation [i'kweif(a)n] - YPoBeHb equipment [i'kwipmntJ - o6oPYAoBaHII1e erase [i'reiz] - CTLi1paTb erect [i'rekt] - B03ABLi1raTb, coop\')KaTb error ['er] - OWLi16Ka escape [is'keip] - 1. 6e)l(aTb, y6eraTb; 2. no6er especially [is'pefIi] - oco6eHHo essay [e'sei] - oepK establish [is'trebliJl - OCHOBblBaTb establishment [is'treblifmnt] - C03AaHLi1e ethnology [ee'nlJcti] - 3THOnOrLi1f1 etiquette [eti'ket] - 3TVlKeT evaporate [i'vrepreit) - Li1CnapTbCfl event [i'vent] - Co6blTII1e, MepOnpLi1f1TVle ever ['ev] - KOrAa-1lLi160, BcerAa evident ['evidnt] - OeBi;1AHblC1, BHblV1 evolution [.i:vJ'lu:f(  )n] - pa3BLi1TlI1e, SBOntOLJ.L-1f1 exact [ig'zrekt] - TOYHblC1 examination [ig,zremi'neiJ()n] - OCMOTP, SK3a- MeH examine [ig'zremin] - SK3aMeHOBaTb, paCCMaT- pVlBaTb excellent ['eksalant] - npesocxoAHblC1 except [ik'sept] - 3a i;1CKJltOeHi;1eM, KpOMe excess [ik'ses] - Li136bITOK, Li131lVlWeK excite [ik'sait) - B036Y)f(.AaTb, BOllHOBaTb exciting [ik'saitiI)J - BOllHYIOW,VlV1, 3axsaTblBalO- lU,Li1 i71 exclaim [iks'kleim] - BOCKnll1KHyrb excursion [iks'k:f()n] - SKCKYPCLi1f1 execution [.eksi'kju:J(  )n] - Ka3Hb exercise ['ekssaiz] - 1. TpeHLi1pOBKa, ynpa)t(He- HLi1e; 2. 3aHi;1MaTbCfI cnopToM exhaust [ig'z:>:st] - Li1CepnbIBaTb exhibit [ig'zibit] - 1. SKcnOHaT; 2. BblCTaSllflTb (B raJlepee) exhibition Leksi'biJ{J)n] - BblCTaSKa expand [ik'sprend] - paCWLi1pTb expect [iks'pekt] - HClAeflTbCfI, O)t(L-1AaTb Vocabulary Elm 
expense [iks'pens] - pacxOA experience [iks'piJrins] - onblT expert ['eksp:t] - CneL.J.VlanViCT explain [ik'splein] - 06bs:lCHs:lTb exploration Lekspl'reif(  )nJ - VlccneAOBaHVle explore [iks'pl:>:] - VlccneAOBaTb, Vl3yyaTb expose (iks'pUZ] - 06nVll.taTb, pa306nayaTb express [ik'spres] - Bblpa>KaTb expression [ik'spref()n] - BblpIDKeHVle extinct (iks'tiDkt] - BblMVlpaTb extinguish (iks'tiDgwiJ] - raCVlTb, -ryWVlTb extra ['ekstra] - AOnOJ1HVlTenbHbIVt, nVlWHVlVt extraordinary [ik'str:dnri] - Heo6blyaVtHblVt exciting [ik'saitilJ) - 6nVlcTaTenbHblVt eyesight ['aisait 1 - 3peHVle F fable [feibl] - 6acHs:I facade [f'sa:d] - <pacaA facility [f'siliti] - o6oPYAoBaHVle factor ['frekt] - <paKTop factory ['frektri] - 3aBOA, <pa6pVlKa fail [feil] - He CYMeTb, TepneTb HeYAayy failure ['fei1j] - HeYAaya, npOBan faint [feint] - cna6blVt fair [f(] - 1. s:lpMapKa; 2. nOps:lAOYHbIVt, cnpa- BeA/u1BbIVt, yeCTHbIVt, CBeTJ1bIVt, 6eJ10KYPbIVt faith [feiG] - Bepa fall [f:>:I] - 1. oceHb; 2. naAaTb (fell, fallen) false [f:>:ls] - nO>KHbIVt, OWVl6oYHblVt fame [feim] - cnasa, Vl3BeCTHOCTb famous ['feims] - 3HaMeHVlTbIVt, Vl3BecTHblVt farm [fa:m] - <pepMa fascinating ['fresineitiJ)] - BeJ1V1KOflenHbIVt, oya- pOBaTeJ1bHVt, YSfleKaTenbHVt fashionable ['fref()nJb1] - MOAHblVt fast [fa:st] - 6blCTPblVt fasten ['fa:sn] - npVlBs:l3bIBaTb, YKpenJ1s:1Tb faucet ['f:>:sit] - KpaH fault [f:>:lt] - oWVl6Ka, SVlHa fear [fi] - 1. CTpax; 2. 60s:lTbCs:I feature ['fi:g] - .1. YepTa; 2. XYAO)f(eCTSeHHbIVt feel [fi:l] ( felt, felt) - YyscTsoBaTb feeling ['fi:lil)] - YYBCTBO, ow,yw.eHVle fence [fens] - orpaAa, 3arpa>KAeHVle, 3a6op, Vl3ropoAb fertile [f:tai1] - nJ10AOpoAHbIVt fiction ['fikf()n] - xYA0>KeCTBeHHas:l nViTepa-ry- pa fiddle ['fidl] - CKpVlnKa field (fi:ld] - none, 06nacTb fierce [fis] - cVlnbHblVt fiercely ['fis1i] - HeViCTOBO fig [fig] - VlH)f(VlP fight [fait] (fought, fought) - Cpa)KaTbC, 60- pOTbCs:I figure ['fig] - <plt1rypa, L.J.VI<ppa fill [fill - HanOnHs:lTb find [faind] (found, found) - HaXOAVlTb Em Vocabulary fine [fain] - HaJ1araTb wTpacp finite ['fainait] - OrpaHVlyeHHblVt fir [f:] - eJ1b fire ['faiJ] - orOHb fireplac ('faiJpleis] - KaMVlH fisherman ('fI.fmJn J - pbl6aK fitness ['fitnis] - 3A. 3AopoBbe fix [fiks] - YVlHVlTb, ynO>Klt1Tb B0J10Cbl flame [fleim] - nnaM5t flap - MaxaTb (Kpblnb5tMVI flat [flret] - nnoCKVlVt flavour ['fleiv] - npVlAasaTb SKYC, 3anax fleet [fli:t J - cpJ10T, <pnoTVlnVls:l flight [flait] - noneT float [flut] - npOHOCVlTbC5t flock [f):>k] - CTas:l floor [fl3:] - 3Ta)t(, nOJ1 flou r [flauJ] - MYKa flow [flu] (flew, flown) - TeYb, CTPYlt1TbC5t fly [flai] - Myxa foal [fJul] - >Kepe6eHoK foam [fJum] - neHa foliage ['fuliicB] - nViCTsa folk [fuk] - HapoAHblVt follow ['flu] - VlATVI 3a, cneAOBaTb, cneAVlTb, c06J1tOAaTb food [fu:d] - eAa foot [fut] - Hora, nOAHO)f(Vle, HVI)t(Hs:l5t yaCTb football ['futb:l] - cpyr60J1 footman ['futmn] - naKeVt for [f3:] - Vl6b, TaK KaK forbid [f"id] (forbade, forbidden) - 3anpe- w,aTb force [f3:S] - CTallKVlsaTb, npVlHaTb forecast ('f:>:ka:st] (forecast, forecasted) - n peACKa3bl BaTb forehead ['f:>rid] - n06 forest ['frist] - J1eCHOVt forestall [f:>:'st:l] - onepe)f(aTb forever [f'rev] - HaBcerAa forget [fJ'get] (forgot, forgotten) - 3a6blsaTb forgetful [f'getful] - 3a6blBYVlSblVt forgive [fJ'giv] (forgave, forgiven) - npocTVlTb fork [f:k] - SVlJ1Ka form [t:m] - 1. KJ1aCC; 2. 06pa30BbiBaTb formal ('f:ml] - cpopMaflbHblVt formulate ['f:mjuleit] - CcpOPMYflVlpoBaTb fort [f:>:t] - <pOPT forth [f:8] - snepeA fortress ['f:>:tris] - KpenocTb fortune ('f:g( J )n] - cYAb6a; COCT05tHVle found ['faund] - C03AaBaTb, OCHOBblBaTb foundation [faun'deif()n] - OCHosaHVle, OCHOBa fragment ('frregmnt] - <pparMeHT, OCKOflOK free [fri:] - 1. oCB060AVlTb; 2. 6ecnflaTHblVt, cB060AHblVt frequently ['fri:kwantli] - yaCTO fresh [freJl - CBe>KVlVt friendship ['frendjip] - AP6a frightened ('fraitnd] - VlcnyraHHblVt front [frAnt] - cpacaA 
fry [frail - >KapLt1Tb fulfil [ful'fil] - BblnOllHVlTb fully ['fuli] - cOBepweHHo, BnOllHe fun [fAn] - Becenbe, 3a6aBa, YAOBOllbcTBVle, pa3Bne'-!eHVle fur [f:] - Mex, wepcTb G gaggle [gregl] - CTa5J (ryceVt) gaily ['geili] - ascenD gain [gein] - 3aBoeBaTb gala ['ga:l] - npa3AHVI'-!HbIVt gallery ['grel:ni] - ranepe5J, XOpbl gallon ['greln] - rannOH (4,54 nViTpa) gallop ['grelp] - CKaKaTb, HeCTVlCb ranonOM game [geim] - Vlrpa gap [grep] - nponoM, 6pewb garden [ga:dn] - caA garlic ['ga:lik] - '-!eCHOK gas [gres] - ra3 gasoline ['gresli:n] - 6eH3V1H gateway ['geitwei] - sopoTa gather ['greo] - co6V1paTb, c06V1paTbcs:I gay [gei] - Hap5JAHbIVt gene [Q)i:n] - reH general ['cBen( )r( a)1] - 06w.VlVt generally ['cBenarli] - 06bl'-!HO, Bo06w.e generation Lctena'reif(  )n] - nOKoneHVle generous rcBenrs] - 6naropoAHblVt, senVlKO- AYWHbIVt, w.eAPbIVt genetic [cBi'netik] - reHeTVI'-!eCKVlVt genius ['cBi:njas] - reHVlVt genre ['3a:nr] - MaHepa, >KaHp gentle [cBentl] - He>KHbIVt, nacKoBblVt, cna6blVt, M5JrKVlVt geometrical [cBia'metrikl] - reoMeTpVl'-!ecKVlVI germ [q,J:m] - MVlKp06, 6aKTepVl5J gesture ['q,estf] - )f(eCT get [get] (got, got) - nony'-!aTb get along - llaALt1Tb get hurt ['geth:t] - nopaHVlTb get mad - BblVtTVI Lt13 ce65J, paCCepALt1TbC5J giant ['q,aint] - 1. rViraHT, BenViKaH; 2. rViraHT- CKVlVt, KpynHVt, orpoMHVt gift [gift] - Aap, nOAapOK girdle [ga:dl] - BeH'-!VlK give up [giv] - OTKa3aTbC5J OT, 6POCVlTb, OTAaTb glance [gla:ns] - B3rn5JA glass [gla:s] - CTeKno global ['glub]] - rn06anbHblVt gloomy ['glu:mi] - Mpa'-!HbIVt, yrptOMblVt glorify ['gl:xrifai] - npOCnaBn5JTb, BOCCnaBn5JTb glorious ['gl:riJs] - 3HaMeHVlTblVt glory ['gl:ri] - rOPAocTb glow [glou] - nbln gnaw [n:] - rpbl3Tb . go on [gun] - npOAOn>KaTb go out - BblXOAVlTb ryn5JTb goddess ['gdis] - 60rVlH5J gold [guld] - 30nOTO golden ['gJuldn] - 30nOTOVt, n030no'-!eHHblVt golfer ['glf] - VI rpoK B ronbQ:> goods [gudz] - TOBap(bl) goose [gu:s] - rycb, MH.'"!. geese [gi:z] - rycVI gorilla ['ga'ril] - ropVlnna gossip ['gsip J - cnneTHVI'-!aTb government ['gAvnmJnt] - npaBVITenbcTBo gown [gaun] - Hap5JA, MaHTVl5J grade [greidJ - Knacc gradually ['grredjli] - nOCTeneHHO grain [grein] - 3epHO grass-plot ['gra:s'plt] - nY>KaVlKa, ra30H grasshopper ['gra:s,h:)p] - KY3He'-!VlK grateful ('greitful] - 6naroAapHblVl grating [greitil)] - peweTKa gratitude ['grretitju:d] - 6naroAapHocTb great [greit] - rpoMaAHblVt, BeJlVlKVlVt greatness ['greitnis] - BeJlLt1'-!Lt1e greed ['gri:d] - >KaAHOCTb green [gri:n] - 3eJleHb greenery ['gri:nri] - 3eneHb, paCTVlTellbHOCTb greet [gri:t] - npVlBeTCTBOBaTb greeting ['gri:til)] - npVlBeTCTBVle ground ['graund] - 3eMn5J grove [gruv] - pow.a, neCOK grow [grJu] (grew, grown)- paCTVI, BblpaCTaTb grown-up [.graun'Ap] - B3pOCJlblVt growth [grue] - pOCT, pa3BVlTVle guard [ga:d] - oCTeperaTbC5J guardian ['ga:djn] - CTpa>KHVlK guess [ges] - 1. AoraAKa; 2. AYMaTb, nonaraTb, AoraAblBaTbC5J guilty ['giltiJ - BVlHOBHblVi guitar [gi'ta:] - rViTapa gun [gAn] - pY>Kbe gymnasium [cBim'neizjm] - rVlMHa3V151, cnopT- 3aJl H habit ['hrebit] - npVlBbl'-!Ka, o6bl'"!aVt haircut ['h£kAt] - CTpVl>KKa handkerchief ['hrel)katjifl - HOCOBOVt nnaTOK handle [hrendl] - PY'-!Ka handsome ['hrensm] - KpacVlBblVt (MY>K'-!VlHa) hang [hrel)] (hung, hung) - BIt1CeTb, pa3BewVl- BaTb happen ['hrep(  }n] - npOVlCXOAIt1Tb, CJlyYaTbCs:I harbour ['ha:b] - raBaHb hard [ha:d] - 1. TPYAHbIVl, T5J>KeJlbIVt; 2. TPYAHO, T5J>KenO, cepbe3HO, ycepAHo hare [hEa] - 3a5JLI. harm [ha:m] - BpeA, yw.ep6 harmful ['ha:mful] - BpeAHbIVt, nary6Hblll1 harvest ['ha:vist] - >t<aTBa, YPo>KaVt hastily ['heistili] - nocneWHO hawthorn ['h:e:n] - 605JPbIWHVlK head [hed] - 1. ronOBa; 2. B03rnaBn5JTb health [hele] - 3AopoBbe Vocabulary mJ 
heat [hi:t] - )f(apa, 3HOVl, Tenno heath (hi:8] - nycTowb, nopocwafl BepecKoM heavy ['hevi] - TfI)f(eJlblVi height [hait] - BblCOTa hemisphere ('hemi,sfiJ] - nOJlywapll1e hence [hens] - OTCtOAa herder [hJ:dJ] - nacTYx heritage ('heritictl - HaCJleAlI1e hero ['hiJrJu] - repoVi hide [haid] (hid, hidden) - npfiTaTbCfI high [hai] - BblCOKO highway ['haiwei] - 60JlbWafi Aopora hiking ['haikiJ)] - AflIl1TenbHafi nporyJlKa, noxOA hill [hil] - XOJlM hint [hint] - HaMeK historian [his't:riJn] - II1CTOpll1K history ['hist( J )r1] - II1CTOpll1f1 hit [hit] (hit, hit) - YAapflTb, YAapll1TbCfI, HaJle- TeTb hive [haiv] - YJleVl holy ['hJuli] - CBflTOVl honest ['nist] - ecTHbIVl, II1CKpeHHII1V1 honey [']lAni] - MeA honour ['nJ] - eCTb hoof [hu:f] - KonblTO hope [hJup] - HClAe>KAa horizon [hJ'raizn] - rOpll130HT horrid ['hrid] - Y>KaCHbIVl, OTBpaTII1TeJlbHblVi horse [h:s] - JlOWaAb horticultural ['h:tikAltfJrJI] - CaAOBblVi hose [hJuz] - WJlaHr host [hJust] -- X03f1I11H hostess ['hJustis] - X03f1V1Ka house [hauz] - nOMew.aTb. pa3Mew.aTb housewife ['hauswaif] - AOMOX03f1V1Ka however [hau'evJ] - KaK 6bl HII1, CKOJlbKO 6bl HII1, OAHaKO. TeM He MeHee huge [hju:ct] - orpoMHblVl, rpoMaAHblVi hum [hAm] - )f(Y>f()f(aTb human ['hju:mJn] - 1. eJlOBeK; 2. eJlOBe4e- CKII1V1 humidity [hju:'miditi] - Bna)f(HOCTb humorist ['hju:mJrist] - tOMOpll1CT hunt [hAnt] - 1. nOIl1CK; 2. OXOTII1TbCfI hurry ['hAri] - CneWIl1Tb, TOpOnll1TbCfI hurt [hJ:t] (hurt; hurt) - nOBpeAII1Tb, npll14111HflTb 60Jlb, 3C1AeTb, YWII16I11Tb, YAapll1Tb husband ['hAzbJndl - MY)f( hut [hAt] - XII1)f(II1Ha, Jla4yra I icon ['aikn] - II1KOHa idea [ai'diJ] - II1Aefl. MblCJlb ideal [ai'diJI] - II1AeaJlbHblVi identical [ai'dentik(J)I] - TO>KtJ.eCTBeHHbIVi identification [ai,dentifi'keifn] - YAocToBepeHlI1e illegal [i'li:g(J)I] - He3aKoHHblVi illness ['ilnis] - 601le3Hb illustrate ['ilJstreit] - II1JlJlfOCTpll1pOBaTb Em Vocabulary illustration [.i1Js'treif(J)n] - II111JlIOCTpau.lI1f1 image ['imict5] - o6pa3 imagine [i'mrectin] - npeACTaBLt1Tb immigrant ['imigrJnt] - II1MMLt1rpaHT. nepecelle- Hell. immovable [i'mu:vJbl] - HenOABII1)t(HbIVi impatient [im'peifnt] - HeTepnellll1Bbl1iJ import [im'p:t]- BB03I11Tb, II1MnOpTlI1pOBaTb important [im'p:tJnt] - Ba)f(HblliJ, 3HaII1Tellb- H bl VI impossible [im'psJbIJ - HeB03MO)f(HbIVi Impressionist [iITI,pref;)'nist] - II1MnpeCCII10HII1CT improve [im'pru:v] - YllywaTb, cOBepweHcT- BOBaTb inch [inn - AIOVIM include [in'klu:d] - BK.ntOaTb including [in'klu:dilJ] - BKJltOafl, B TOM II1CJle incorporate [in'k:pJreit] - 06beAII1HflTb increase [in'kri:s] - YBeJu,14I11BaTb, B03pacTaTb, . YBeJlll14111BaTbcfI independence [.indi'pendns] - He3aBII1CII1MOCTb indicator Lindi'keitJ] - II1HAII1KaTOp individual Lindi'vidjuJI] - 3A. 4aCTHoe JlIl1lJ,O industrious [inJdAstriJs] - TPYAOllt06111BblVi industry ['indJstri] - npOMblWlleHHocTb. II1HAY- CTpll1f1 infant ['infJnt] - nOArOTOBII1TellbHblVl influence ['influJns] - 1. Bllll1f1HlI1e; 2. BJlIl1f1Tb informal (in'f:mI] - Heo<J>II1LJ.lI1allbHbIVl ingredient (in'gri:djJnt] - COCTaBHafi 4aCTb inhabit [in'hrebit] - HacellflTb inheritance [in'herit(J)ns] - HaClleAlI1e initiative (i'nijiJtiv] - II1HII1LJ.lI1aTII1Ba injury ['incBJri] - YBebe inkpot ['iIJkpt] - 4epHII111bHII1LJ.a inkstand ['ilJkstrend] - 4epHII111bHII1LJ.a inscription (in'skripf(J)n] - HClAnll1Cb insect ('insekt] - HaceKOMoe insecurity (.insi'kjuJriti] - HeHaAe)f(HOCTb inspire [in'spaiJ] - BAOXHOBllSlTb instead (of) [in'sted] - BMeCTO, B3aMeH insulator Linsju'leitJ] - 1I13011flTOp intact [in'trekt] - HenOBpe)f(AeHHbIVl, HeBpeAII1- M bl VI intellectual [.int:}'lekfuJI] - VlHTe11JleKl)'aJlbHbIVi intelligence [in'telicBJns) - YM, II1HTell11eKT intend [in'tend] - HaMepeBaTbcSI, npeAHa3Ha- 4aTb intensive [in,tensiv] - II1HTeHCII1BHblll1, CTpeMII1- TeJlbHblVl intention (in'ten.f{J)n] - HaMepeHlI1e, LJ.enb interact (.intJrJrekt] - B3all1MOAelilcTBoBaTb interaction [.intJr'rekfn] - B3all1MOAeVlCTBII1e interconnect (.intJkJ'nckt] - CB513bIBaTb, co- eAII1HflTb interfere [.intJ'fiJ] - BMeWII1BaTbCSI international LintJ(: }'nrefJnl] - Me)f(.AyHapOAHblVi interrelation (.intJri'leifn] - B3aIl1MOOTHOWeH1-1e interrupt LintJ'rApt] - npepblBaTb introduce Lintr'dju:s] - npeAcTaBllflTb, 3HaKO- MII1Tb 
introduction [.intr;}ldAkfn] - npeACTaBJleHVle, 3HaKOMCTBO intrude [in'tru:d] - 3J1oynoTpe6V1Tb intrusion [in'tru:3( d)n] - nOCflraTeJlbCTBO invade [in'veid] - oKKynVlpoBaTb, BTopraTbCfI invaluable [in'vreljudbl] - 6ecu,eHHblVt invasion [in'vei3( d )n] - BTOp>KeHVle, HaweCTBVle invention [in'venJ{d)n] - Vl306peTeHVle invest [in'vest] - BKJlaAblBaTb investigate [in'vestigeit] - VlCCJleAOBaTb invitation (.invi'teifn] - npVlr/laWeHVle invite [in'vait] - npV1rJlaWaTb involve [in'vlv] - BOBJleKaTb, npVlHVlMaTb yya- CTVI e iron ['aidn] - 1. >KeJle30; 2. yTtOr; 3. rJlaAVlTb island ['aildnd] - OCTpOB J jacket l'cBrekit] - KYPTKa jar [ct>a:] - KYBWVlH jewel l'cBu:JI] - Aparou,eHHblVt KaMeHb job [cB:>b] - pa60Ta, 3aHflTVle, cJly)t(6a jog [cB:>9] - 6eraTb TPYCU,OVt join [cB:>in] - npVlcoeAVlHflTbCfI joke [cBduk] - wyTKa journey ['cBd:ni] - noe3AKa, nyrewecTBVle joy [cB:>i] - PaAOCTb, BeCeJlbe judge l'cBAcB] - CYAbfl jug [cBA9] - KYBWVlH junior [,ct>u:njd] - MJlaAWVlVt just [c\)Ast] - 1. CnpaBeAflVlBbIVt; 2. TOJlbKO YTO K keep [ki:p] (kept, kept) - 3aw.LI1LU.aTb, Aep>KaTb kid [kid] - AypaYLI1Tb kin [kin] - POA, ceMbfl, pOACTBO kind [kaind] - COpT, BVlA, POA, Ao6pblVt king [kiI)] - KOpO/lb kingdom ['kiI)ddm] - KOpOJ1eBCTBO kiss [kis] - nou,eJlYVt, u.eJlOBaTb kite [kait] - B03AYWHblVt 3MeVt kitten ['kitn 1 - KOTeHOK knee [ni:] - KO/leHO knife [naif] (pI. knives) - HO)t( knit [nit] - Bfl3aTb knowledge ['n:>lict5] - 3HaHVle, 3HaHVlfI L label ['leibl] - HaK/leVlBaTb 3TLI1KeTKVI laboratory [ld'brdt(J)ri] - /la60paTOpLl1f1 labour ['leibJ 1 - TPYA lace [leis] - Kpy>t<eBo lad [Ired] - napeHb, tOHOwa lamb [lrem] - flrHeHOK, OBeYKa land [lrend] - CTpaHa, 3eMJlfl landscape ['Irenskeip] - neVt3a>K, flaHAwacpT lantern ['Irentdn] - cpoHapb last [Io:st] - AllL11TbCfI, npOAOJl)t(aTbCfI latitude ['lretitju:d] - WLI1pOTa laugh [la:f] - CMeftTbCs:I law [l:] - 3aKOH lawn [l:>:n] - ra30H, JlaVtKa lawyer ['1:>jJ] - aABOKaT, tOpLl1CT lay [lei] (laid, laid) - nOJlO>KVlTb layer ['leiJ] - CJlOVt, nJlaCT lazy ['leizi] - JleHLI1BblVt lead [li:d] (led, led) - BeCTVI, npLl1BOALI1Tb, PYKO- BOAV1Tb, B03rJ1aBJ1s:1Tb league [li:g] - flVlra leaky ['li:ki] - npoTeKatOw.VlVt learning ['Id:nil)] - Y4eHLI1e, o6pa30BaHLI1e leash [li:Jl - nOBOAOK, npLl1Bft3b leave [li:v] (left, left) - OCTaBJlflTb leg [leg] - Hora legend ['lecB(J)nd] - JlereHAa - 233 lengthen ['leI)8( d )n] - YAJlLI1HflTb less [les] - MeHbwe let [let] (let, let) - n03BOJlflTb, pa3pewaTb lettuce ['Ietis] - CaJ1aT-JlaTyK library ['laibrJri] - 6L116JlVlOTeKa lick [lik] - JlLl13aTb lie [lai] (lay, lain) - Jle)t(aTb life ['laif] - >KVl3Hb lift [lift] - nOAHVlMaTb light [lait] - 1. CBeT; 2. CBeTJlbIVt; 3. 3a>KVlraTb, 03apflTb (lit; lit) lightly [laitli] - JlerKO likeness ['Iaiknis] - CXOACTBO limit ['limit] - OrpaHVlYVlBaTb, npeAeJl line [lain] - OyepeAb, Jl1l1H1I1f1, TpOC, CTOs:lTb BAOJlb, BbICTpaLl1BaTbCfI, CTpOKa link [liI)k] - CBfl3blBaTb lip [lip] - ry6a list [list] - COCTaBJlflTb Cn1l1COK litter ['Htd] - 3arpfl3HflTb; MYCOP lively ['laivli] - nOABVI)t(HbIVt, )t(1I1BOVt, flpKLI1Vt lizard ['lizdd] - flw.epVlu,a loan [ldun] - 3aeM local ['IJukdl] - MecTHblVt located [ldu'keitid] - pacnOJlO>KeHHblVt lock [l:>k] - 3anLl1paTbCfI Ha 3aMOK logic ['1:>cBik] - JlOrVlKa lonely ['ldunli] - OAVlHOKLI1Vt longitude ['I:>nctitju:d] - AOJlrOTa look for [luk] - VlCKaTb look like ['luk Iaik] - 6blTb nOXO)t(1I1M looking-glass ['lukiI)gla:s] - 3epKaJlO loose ['Iu:s] - cBo6oAHO lose [lu:z] (lost, lost) - npOll1rpblBaTb, TepflTb loss [I:>s] - nOTepfl loud [laud] - rpOMKLI1Vt love ['lAY] - flt06V1Tb lovely ['IAvli] - npeJleCTHblVt loving ['IA viI)] - npeAaHHblVt low [IJu] - HL/13KL/1Vt lowland ['lduIJnd] - AOJlVlHa, HV13V1Ha loyal ['l:>iJl] - BepHblVt Vocabulary mJ 
luck [IAk] - YAaa, cllYl.Ja lucky ['IAki] - Cl.JaCTllLt1BbIVt luggage ['l!\gic\3] - 6ara>K lullaby I'IAldbai] - KOllbl6ellbHa5t (neCH5J) lyceum [Iai'sidm] - llVleVl lyrical [Ilirik( d )1] - llLt1pLt1l.JeCKLt1 M machine [mdji:n] - MaWLt1Ha, MeXaHLt13M mad [mred] - paCCep>KeHHblVi magazine (.mregd'zi:n] - >KYPHall magnificent [mreg'nifisnt] - BellLt1KOllenHbIVl, BellLt1 eCTBeH H bl VI mail [meiI] - nOl.JTa, nOTOBa5J KoppecnoHAeHVl5J main [meinl - rllaBHblVl, OCHOBHOVl, Brot<HeWVlVt maintain [mein'tein] - nOAAep>KVlBaTb majority [md'c\3riti] - 6011bWLt1HCTBO make ('meik] (made, made) - aaCTaBll5JTb. AellaTb male [meiI] - MY'KVlHa, MOllOAO e/lOBeK manage ['mreni<\)] - cYMeTb, YAaBaTbC5J mankind [.mren'kaind] - ellOBeeCTBO manned [mrend] - ynpaBn5JeMbIVl, nVllloTVlpye- MblVi (elloBeKoM) manner ['mrend] - MaHepa, o6pa3 AeCTBVl5J map [mrep] - KapTa maple (meipl] - KneH, KlleHoBblVi marble (ma:bl] - MpaMop march [ma:tfJ - WeCTBLt1e, Mapw mark [ma:k] - OTMeaTb, AenaTb 3aMeTKVI market ['ma:kit] - pblHOK marmalade ['ma:mdleid] - A>f(eM, nOBLt1AJlO marriage ['mreric\3] - 6paK, >KeHVlTb6a marvellous ['ma:vlds] - BOCXLt1TLt1TellbHbIVl, npe- KpacHblVl, YAecHbIVt mask [ma:sk] - MaCKa massive ['mresiv] - MaccVlBHblVt masterpiece ('ma:std,pi:s] - weAeBp, TBopeHVle match [mretfJ - COOTBeTCTBOBaTb mate [meitJ- nOMow,HLt1K matter ['mretd] - Lt1MeTb 3HaeHVle meadow ['meddu] - llyr mean [mi:n] (meant, meant) - 3Hal.JVlTb, 03HaaTb meaning ['mi:nir)] - 3HaeHVle, CMblcn means [mi:nz] - cpeAcTBo(a) measure ['me3d] - Mepa medical ['medik( d)l] - MeAVILt1HCKVlVt medicine ['medsin] - lleKapcTBo medium ['mi:djdm] - CpeAHLt1Vt melt (melt] - nllaBLt1Tb( C5J) memorial [mi'm:ridl] - naM5ITHLt1K memorize ['memd,raiz] - 3anOMVlHaTb, 3ayVI- BaTb HaLt13ycTb memory ['memdri] - naM5JTb menagerie [mi'nrec\3dri] - 3BepVlHe mental ['mentI] - YMcTBeHHblVi mention ['menf(d)n] - HaMeKHYTb, ynoMlII-taTb mercy ['m:si] - MVlllocepAVle, CHVlCXO>KAeHVle merely ['midli] - TOllbKO mermaiden ['md:meiddn] - CiI1peHa mJ Vocabulary message ('mesicB] - nOCllaHLt1e, co06w.eHVle messenger ['mesin<\);)] - nOCblllbHblVt metal [metI] - MeTalln metallurgy [me'treIdQ)i] - MeTallnyprLt15J method ['meedd] - npLt1HiI1n mice [mais] - MbIWLt1, e,.Q. 1./. mouse [maus] - MblWb middle [midI] - cpeAHVlVt midnight ('midnait] - nO/lHOb mighty ['maiti] - MOW,HbIVt, rpoMaAHblVi migrate [mai'greit] - MVlrpLt1pOBaTb (0 nTLt1ax) mild [maild] - M51rKLt1V1 mile [mail] - MVlll51 milestone ['mailstun] - Bexa mill [mill - MenbHVIa mind ['maind] - B03pa>KaTb mirror [Imir;}] - aepKaJlO miserable ['miz(;})r(d)bl] - >KaIlKLt1V1, HecacTHbl miserly ['maizdli] - cKynoVl miss [mis] - HeAOCTaBaTb, He xS6TaTb, npo- nYCKaTb (YPOKVI), cKYaTb mist [mist] - TyMaH misunderstand [.misAndJ'strend] (misunderstood, misunderstood) - HenpaBLt1nbHO nOH5JTb mix [miks] - CMeWVlBaTb modern ['m3d(J)n] - cOBpeMeHHblVt modest ['m3dist] - CKpOMHblVt moisture ['m3istf;}] - Bllara mood [mu:d] - HaCTpOeHLt1e moon [mu:n] - nYHa moreover [m3:'rduv] - KpOMe Toro mosquito [ms'ki:tu] - KOMap motherland ['mAo;}lrend] - pOA1'1Ha, OTeeCTBO motto ['m3tu] - AeBVl3 mound [maund] - xonM, HaCblnb, KypraH mountain ('mauntin] - ropa mourn (m3:n] - On/laKLt1BaTb mouth [mauS] - pOT move [mu:v] - 1. ABLt1>KeHVle; 2. nepeMew.aTb, ABVlraTbC5J movement l'mu:vmJnt] - ABVI>KeHVle, nepeMe- eHLt1e movie ['mu:vi] - KVlHO mug [mAg] - Kpy>KKa muscle ['mAst] - Mblwu.a, MYCKYll mushroom ['mAfrum] - rpLt16 musician [mju:'zifn] - MY3blKaHT m utter ['m!\t] - 6opMoTaTb mutton [mAtn] - 6apaHLt1Ha muzzle [lT1Azl] - HaMOPAHVlK mysterious (mi'stiJri;}s] - TaLt1HCTBeHHbIVl, 3ara- AOHbl myth [mi8] - MVlq, I N nail [neil] - HorOTb napkin ['nrepkin] - callq,eTKa narrative ['nrerJtiv] - 3nVleCKVlVt nation ['neif(J)n] - HaVl5J, HapOA 
r nationality [nreJ'nreliti] - HaLJ.VlOHaJlbHOCTb native ('neitiv] - MecTHblVl )f(VlTeJlb; pOAHOVl, co6cTBeHHblVl nature ['neiU" J - npVlpOAa naughty ('n:ti] - HenOCJlywHbIVl, KanpVl3HblVl navigate ('nrevigeit] - ynpaBJl5JTb Navy ['neivi] - BoeHHo-MopCKOVl near [ni] - n06JlVl30CTVI nearby ['nibai] - 6JlVl3KVlVI, coceAHVlV1 neatly ('ni:tli] - aKKypaTHo necessary ['nessri] - o63aTeJlbHbIVl, Heo6- XOAVIMblVl neck [nek] - we5J nectar ['nekt] - HeKTap need [ni:d] - HaAo6HocTb, HY)f(Aa, nOTpe6- HOCTb needle ['ni:dl] - VlfJla neglect [ni'glekt] - He6pe)f(HOCTb neighbour ['neib] - coceA neighbourhood ['neibhud] - coceACTBO nest [nest] - fHe3AO net [net] - ceTb newcomer ['nju:kAm] - BHOBb npVl6blBWVlVI newsreel ['nju:zri:l] - KVlHO)f(YPHaJl nickname ['nikneim] - npo3BVlw.e nightingale ['naitil)geil] - COJlOBeVl noble [nubl] - 6JlarOpOAHblVl, 3HaTHblVl nod [nd] - KBaTb rOJlOBOVl noise [niz] - WYM non-smoker ['nn'smuk] - HeKYP5Jw.VI none [OAn] - H OAVlH, HViKTO nonferrous ['nn'fers] - LJ.BeTHble MeTaJlJlbl note-book ['nutbuk] - 3anCHa5J KHlI1>KKa notice ['nutis] - 3aMeyaTb, o6paw.aTb BHlI1Ma- He notion ('nouJ(  )n] - nOH5JTVle nourish ['nAriJl - KOpMVlTb, YKpenJl5JTb, nOJlb- CTVlTb novel ['n:>v()l] - pOMaH nowadays ['naudeiz] - B Hawe BpeM5J, Tenepb nuclear ['nju:kli J - 5JAepHblVl numerous ['nju:mrs] - MHOrOYVlCJleHHblVl nurse ['n:s] - MeAVlLJ.VlHCKa5J ceCTpa nursery ['n:sri] - AeTcKVlVI caA nutrition [nju:'triJ()n] - nVlTaHVle o oak ['uk] - Ay6 obedience ['bi:dins] - nOCJlywaHVle, nOBlI1HO- BeHVle obedient ['bi:djJnt] - nOCJlywHblVl obey ['bei] - nOA'-IVlHTbC5J, CJlywaTbC5J, nOBVI- HOBaTbC5J observation [.::>bzJ'veiJnl- Ha6JltOAeHVle observe [Jb'zJ:v J - Ha6JltOAaTb obtain [b'tein] - nOJlY'-IaTb obviously [':>bviJsli] - O'-leBVlAHO \ occasion [J'kei3(J)n] - nosoA, CJlyYaVl, BOO)f(- \ HOCTb, oCHoBaHVle, o6bcHeHe, C06blTlI18 occasionally [J'kei3Jnll i] - CJlY'-IaVlHO, peAKo occupation [.::>kju'peiJ(J)n] - 3aHTVle, npo<t>eccV1 occupy [':>kjupai] - 3aHV1MaTb, OXBaTblBaTb offender ['fendJ] - npecTynHVlK offensive [J'fensiv 1 - HenpVlJlVl'-lHO offer [':>f] - npeAllaraTb office ['fis J - KOHTopa offshore [':>fJ:>:] - HaXOA5Jw.VlVlC AaJleKO OT 6e- pefa offspring ['fspril) 1 - 3A. nOTOMCTBO oil [:>il] - HecpTb old [uld] - cTapVlHHbIVl, cTapblVl onion I'Anjn 1 - JlYK onlooker [':>n,luk] - Ha6JltOAaTeJlb opal ['up()lJ - onaJl opening ['upnil)] - Ha'-laJlO, BCTynJleHVle opera ['p(  )r] - onepa operate [':>pJreit] - npVlBOAV1Tb B AeVlcTBVle opinion [J'pinjn] - MHeHVle, B3rn5lA opportunity (.:>pg'tju:niti] - B03MO)f(HOCTb oppression [;)'preJ()n] - yrHeTeHVle optimistic Lpti'mistik] - onTVlMVlCTVI'-IHbIVi orang-utan [':rreI)'u:tren] - opaHfyaaH orchestra [':kistrg] - opKeCTp order [':>:d] - npV1Ka3aTb ordinary [':>:dnri] - 06bl'-lHbIVl, 06blKHoBeHHblVl organ [':>:gn] - opraH organize ['::>:gnaiz] - opraHV130BblBaTb original [;}'ricB;}nl] - nepBOHa'-lallbHblVl originate ['ricBineit] - npOV1cxOATb ornament [':nmnt] - YKpaweHe, opHaMeHT, YKpawaTb orphanage ['=>:fnicB] - npVltOT AJl51 CVlpOT orthodox [':ed::>ks] - npaBOCJlaBHblVl outsell [aut'sel] (outsold, outsold) - npOAa- BaTbCS1 outside ['aut'said] - cHapVI outstanding (.aut'strendiIJJ - BbIAatOUJ.VlVlC5J outwit [aut'wit] - nepeXTpVlTb, npOBeCTII1 (Koro-ll6o) oven ['Avn] - AYXOBOVI wKacp, AyxoBKa overlook Luv;}'luk] - He o6paw.aTb BHVlMaHVl5I overpopulation ['UVJ,p::>pju'leiJ()n] - nepeHa- CeJleHe overtime ['uvtaim] - cBePXYPO'-lHO owe (to) [u] - 6blTb 065J3aHHb1M own [un] - 1. BnaAeTb; 2. co6cTBeHHblVl p pace [peis] - CKOpOCTb, TeMn package ['prekict] - CBepTOK pain [pein] - 60Jlb paint [peint] - 3A. ncaTb MaCllOM painting ['peintil)] - KapTHa, )f(VlBOnCb pair [pc] - napa palace ['prelis] - ABOpeLJ. pale [peil] - 6JleAHblVl palm [po:m] - naAOHb pang [prel)] - BHe3anHa5J oCTpa 60nb Vocabulary  
panorama r.pren'ra:mJ - naHopaMa paper ['peip] - 6YMara parade [p'reid] - napaA pardon [pa:dn] - npow.aTb parental [p'rentl J - pOAVlTef1bCKVlii1 parliament ['pu:lmnt] - napf1aMeHT parsley ['pa:sJi] - neTpywKa part [pa:t] - '-IaCTb, f1enTa particular [p'tikjul] - oc06eHHblii1, OC06blii1 particularly [p'tikjul1i] - OL.feHb, oc06eHHo partner ['PQ:tn] - napTHep partnership ['pa:tnJsip] - napTHepcTBo party ['pa:ti] - napTV1f1, KOMnaHVlfI pass [pa:s] - npoxoAVlTb, nepeAasaTb, naco- BaTb pass by [pu:sbai] - npoii1TII1 MII1MO pass on [pu:s] - nepeAasaTb pass through ['pa:s8ru:] - npOea>KaTb passenger ['presincB] - nacca>KlI1p passion ['pref{ ) n] - CTpaCTb patch [preij] - Kf10'-lOK aeMf1111 path [pa:8] - Aopora, AOpO>KKa patience ['peif{)ns] - TepneHVle patient ['peif(  )nt] - Tepnef1I11Sblii1 pattern ['pretn] - o6paaeLJ., p1l1CYHOK pause [p:z] - nayaa paw [p:l - f1ana pay for [pei] - nf1aTII1Tb, OnJ1aL.fVlSaTb payment ['peimntJ - Onf1aTa. nf1aTe>K peace [pi:s] - cnoKoii1cTSlI1e. TII1WII1Ha peaceful ['pi:sful] - MII1PHblii1, cn